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  1. #1
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Minolta XG-M shutter problem

    On Saturday I bought a Minolta XG-M with 1.7 / 50 for only $20. I tested the camera with new batteries at the flea market and the shutter seemed to fire OK. (It was set at 1/1000.) When I got home I gave a more thorough inspection at all the shutter speeds in manual mode. At first, on the slow speeds the shutter fired instantaneously, much to my dismay. I kept firing and, occasionally, the speed on the slowest speeds would be OK. I kept firing and playing with it and within five minutes the speeds were 'right on' consistently. I tried again a day later and all seems to be well. Also, on the first day, Saturday, I tried the self-timer. At first, no blinking light would occur but the timing was right. Again, eventually with playing around the blinking light was right and consistent.

    I am rather intrigued as to this circumstance. I could see a mechanical shutter 'freezing up' due to dried out lubricants and then eventually 'unfreezing'. But the electroninc information as to shutter timing is not explained here. And the 'laziness' of the self timer's blinking light baffles me also. Anyone have an answer here or had similar experience? I have bought cameras for decades and even do minor repairs like changing prisms or internal cleaning. Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    BobD's Avatar
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    I do minor repairs as well and have been collecting/buying/selling film cameras
    for a long time. I've seen this sort of thing on occasion and it puzzles me too.

    In my experience the Minolta XG-series do seem prone to electronic problems
    (when found today) but I am not sure what could cause this. They did use
    simple processor chips in cameras of this vintage and I can only guess that it
    could be due to the chip needing to reset (like a "reboot" on a computer) or
    something along those lines. Some cameras from this same era such as some
    Olympus OM series have a reset button or switch to accomplish this.

    It also could be due to a faulty electronic component that is working
    intermittently due to effects from moisture, heat, motion, etc

  3. #3
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    At first, on the slow speeds the shutter fired instantaneously, much to my dismay. I kept firing and, occasionally, the speed on the slowest speeds would be OK. I kept firing and playing with it and within five minutes the speeds were 'right on' consistently.
    This could be simply due to the camera lying unused for a long duration. If it seems to have corrected itself then likely that is the case.

    Also, on the first day, Saturday, I tried the self-timer. At first, no blinking light would occur but the timing was right.
    I have never encountered a sluggish timing light. I would think that something is off there. Have you tried to trigger the timer via the cable lug on the left side of the lens mount? See if the problem persists.

    The electronic information as to shutter timing is not explained here. And the 'laziness' of the self timer's blinking light baffles me also.
    No, it is not. Perhaps all of these prblems will keep themselves worked out. I have never encountered these before in an XG-M. Sorry I'm not being much help here. Just my .02.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  4. #4

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    Timing is electronic through resistor/capacitor combinations.
    Magnets control the shutter actuation & timing. If there's a dirty or oily Mg it can act the way your camera has.
    Possibility of tarnished switch contact at the switch itself. If that's it, the contact should be directly under the switch dial. The contacts on the dial are very fragile & can be deformed easily.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  5. #5
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Thank you all for your responses.....and John

    John, I thought that is was an oxidized contact but initially refrained from stating that. And also the other response of rebooting really intrigues me. I have bought dozens of the excellent Minolta electronic (pre-Maxxum) bodies and this is the first time I encountered an insolent and idiosyncratic shutter. Thanks again.

    I will never understand why a dog keeps its head out of a moving vehicle. - David Lyga.

  6. #6
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    And also the other response of rebooting really intrigues me.
    Yeah, never knew the X series cameras had chips. Any of'em.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti



 

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