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  1. #21
    flatulent1's Avatar
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    I found ECF to work quite reliably, though I don't use it often. I have the 1, 1N, 1N-RS, 1V and 3. I have never liked the 1, can't really tell you why; it has been my loaner camera for the last few years, and I'm thinking of unloading it. The 1N is a sentimental favorite that I can't bear to part with but use only rarely. The 1N-RS is a fabulous camera that, because if its bulk, doesn't get used at all; the EOS RT is an awfully nice camera, does some of the same things, and is much lighter. The 1V and 3 get the most use, and it's hard to choose between them. For price, pick the 3. Then get an RT for the pellicle mirror.

    I should mention that all of these cameras can take a focusing screen optimized for manual focusing. I think I have one in the 1N, but I don't recall which screen it is. EC-A or EC-B.
    Last edited by flatulent1; 03-14-2010 at 09:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Fred Latchaw
    Seattle WA


    I am beginning to resent being referred to as 'half-fast'.
    Whatever that's supposed to mean.

  2. #22
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Fred, the EOS 1 was the first in the pro-series line up and the first direct EF descendent from the successful FD T90 body. It was a breathtakingly good start. It found instant acclaim but Canon was beavering away on refinement less than 8 months after it's release (in 1989), working toward the 1N release in 1994 (at that time, a 1N body cost more than $3,000). The elderly 1 is still in wide use among travellers looking for reliability and robustness, even though the 1 is considerably less endowed than its brethren 1N / RS et al. Like legions of others, I won't part with my 1N+PDBE1) for all the tea in China!!
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  3. #23
    flatulent1's Avatar
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    The 1N is a sweet camera, but I have so many others that none of them ever get a proper workout. I have to say, though, that the only thing the original 1 has over the others is it has a sinister look to it; it's very cool.
    Fred Latchaw
    Seattle WA


    I am beginning to resent being referred to as 'half-fast'.
    Whatever that's supposed to mean.

  4. #24
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Oh I love that description, "...that the only thing the original 1 has over the others is it has a sinister look to it; it's very cool" Yes it sure is.
    But nothing really changed after the 1. I still get intrigued interjections from passers-by in the bush who have "never seen a camera like that [1N] before... Oh, it's a film camera!?", and similar comments I can recall were also common when I used the Canon T90 — every model Canon released forward of that had eve more curves! Remember all these lush, curvaceous FD and EOS bodies were designed by an Italian...!
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  5. #25
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    The thing I don't like about ECF on my EOS 3 is the sensor/whatever... that is directly inside the viewfinder eyepiece. I assume this is what detects where your pupil is looking on the focussing screen .


    This sensor tends to reduce the contrast through the viewfinder.

    Anyone else notice this?
    At first I thought the coating was bad on my eyepiece/slip in diopter.

  6. #26
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Yes, the sensor throws a matrice over the pupil to trace its movement, correlating that with the layout of the focusing points in the viewfinder.
    Historically, some opticians have expressed concern about the idea of having beam so close to the eye but it appears nothing untoward has been reported.
    It is the 'flare' of the beam that people interpret as reducing contrast. Ideally turn the whole silly thing off and concentrate on the image in front of the camera rather than the technology trying to do everything for you.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  7. #27
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    I notice the reduced contrast of the viewfinder whether the ECF is on or not.

    The viewfinder just isn't as "snappy" as my 1V for manual focussing some of my mf glass.

    More of an observation than a complaint really.

  8. #28
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    The EOS 3 is not the EOS 1V, Bruce. That's the difference, including the less optimally sized viewfinder than on the 1V (100%).

    Try using a matte section screen.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  9. #29
    SilverGlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Ideally turn the whole silly thing off and concentrate on the image in front of the camera rather than the technology trying to do everything for you.
    Actually ECF does let you concentrate on the image before you and not the technology ;-)

    With ECF I no longer have to use my right thumb to press on the [...] button then my right index finger and right thumb to pick and choose the appropriate focus point...I need only just look at the focus point and bingo, it gets chosen. ECF can simplify camera workflow and make shooting faster and more accurate too.

    Allowing the camera to do some of the camera workflow for you is not a crutch, as some suggest...
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  10. #30
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Poisson.
    I'm well aware of that as I'm shooting with a 1n, a 3 and a 1v currently. (not to mention 4 different EOS digi bodies).

    The OP originally ask the differences.

    Thought I'd mention it if that's okay with you.

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