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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Delta 400 is an excellent film, I use it in 120 and wish it was available in LF sizes, but I think if I was using 35mm again I'd use Delta 100 or Tmax 100.

    Why don't yo try doing your own processing, it's quite easy to buy all you need second hand for next to nothing in the UK, I picked up complete enlargers etc for free (donated to the APUG Irish Workshop contingent).

    Ian

  2. #12
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberspider View Post
    what is a good film for landscape i was told ILFORD DELTA 400 PRO is good
    any advice welcome
    thank you
    Just one landscape? Which one? What is the light like? What do you want in the print?

    This is also in the wrong forum. Try one of the film/paper/processing forums.

    Films I use for landscapes are:

    Fuji Reala
    Fuji Superia/Press (all speeds, 100 to 1600, 35mm only)
    Fuji Pro 400H
    Fuji Pro 800Z
    Fuji Pro 160S
    Fuji Pro 160C
    Fuji Provia 100F
    Fuji Provia 400F/400X
    Fuji Sensia (all speeds, 100 to 400, 35mm only)
    Fuji Astia 100F
    Fuji Velvia 100F
    Fuji Velvia 100 (my least used of all three Velvias for landscapes)
    Fuji Velvia 50
    Fuji T64 (for night shooting in city light: "cityscapes")
    Fuji Neopan Acros 100
    Kodak Portra 160NC
    Kodak Portra 160VC
    Kodak Portra 400NC
    Kodak Portra 400VC
    Kodak Portra 800
    Kodak EPP
    Kodak EPN
    Kodak E200
    Kodak Elite Chrome (all speeds, 100 to 400, 35mm only)
    Kodak Tri-X 400 (small and medium format)
    Kodak Tri-X 320 (medium and large format)
    Kodak Plus-X
    Kodak T-Max 400
    Kodak T-Max 100
    Ilford Pan F
    Ilford FP4
    Ilford HP5
    Ilford Delta 3200
    Ilford SFX 200
    Ilford Ortho (sheet film only)
    Efke/Adox 25/50/100
    Efke IR820C
    Rollei IR 400

    ...depending on what I want, what the shooting conditions are, what the light is like, and what I happen to have.

    The best advice? Ignore generalizations or absolute statements of opinion as fact. Think about what you want, and pick a film that will give it to you in each particular situation. Ask people to describe films and compare films, rather than asking what is "best". If you are letting anyone tell you what "A Landscape" should look like, you have no business fooling with an artistic medium in the first place, IMHO. If you are letting yourself be told things like this, why are you taking pictures at all? What is the point? Really think about that.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 03-14-2010 at 10:57 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #13

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    Keep the ISO low if you want really good tones.

    Just try something until you like it - you pretty much cant go wrong.
    Toledo Camera Trader and photojournalist

  4. #14
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    BTW, I appreciate your goal of supporting analog photography, but it will only be recognized for what it is if we at least aim for perfection. Mediocre compromises may be counter-productive if they create more disappointment than satisfaction. We ow it to the OP to show interim containment actions as well as outlining long-term solutions.
    With respect Ralph, perfection by who's definition, yours, mine, Ansel Addams' or Miroslav Tichy's?
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #15
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    With respect Ralph, perfection by who's definition, yours, mine, Ansel Addams' or Miroslav Tichy's?
    Perfection as in 'the best one can do' to improve it until it is as flawless as possible, Miroslav included.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #16

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    A newbie's opinion....

    I have been playing with B&W film for about 6 months. During this time, I found, using "the best" film is one thing but getting the result I was promised is quite another. For example, based on reviews and recommendations, I started with Tmax400. Fine grain, nice tones, etc, etc, etc.... I have been struggling with getting nice tones. On the other hand, "the old stand-by", TriX400 has been giving me what I want.

    I was told, when done "just right", Tmax will give me far above and beyond TriX ever can. While I don't doubt it is possible, I personally have not seen it come out of my own dark room.

    I don't know the experience level of OP and he may very well be way ahead of me. But I just wanted to throw this in here to show the other side of the equation.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #17
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    tkamiya

    You make a great point. Everybody needs to find what works for them.

    When I first came back to film I started with E6, gorgeous to project but, for me, too big a hassle to print.

    I do enjoy traditional B&W films and printing, but the more I use it the more I like C-41 and RA-4. I've yet to meet a C-41 film I don't like.

    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    A newbie's opinion....

    I have been playing with B&W film for about 6 months. During this time, I found, using "the best" film is one thing but getting the result I was promised is quite another. For example, based on reviews and recommendations, I started with Tmax400. Fine grain, nice tones, etc, etc, etc.... I have been struggling with getting nice tones. On the other hand, "the old stand-by", TriX400 has been giving me what I want.

    I was told, when done "just right", Tmax will give me far above and beyond TriX ever can. While I don't doubt it is possible, I personally have not seen it come out of my own dark room.

    I don't know the experience level of OP and he may very well be way ahead of me. But I just wanted to throw this in here to show the other side of the equation.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #18

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    Ralph,
    thanks for replying the way you did, and not biting my head off for saying what I did! You've got more photographic experience in one little finger than I do in both hands put together.
    I just wanted to let the OP know that it's OK to shoot 35mm, and there have been a lot of good landscapes taken with it. Of course larger format will give you greater enlargments options!
    Best,
    Jed

  9. #19
    wclark5179's Avatar
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    Don't forget to use a tripod.

    Maybe even a shutter release cable.

    And perhaps flipping the mirror up before exposure.


    I've got several 40" x 30" prints that I've made for clients and the equipment was set up like I just described. Also things like lighting, composition and things like tic-tack-toe (rule of thirds & leading lines) also help. There are others but forget those for now.

    Just get started. Enjoy & have fun.

    For 35mm I'd recommend using slide film. I like Velvia. That's just me!
    Bill Clark

  10. #20
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    ...Everybody needs to find what works for them...
    I agree with that as well, but look at 2F/2F's list in post #12. How long would it take just to try them all? After I got started and went on the hunt for the ideal film soon after, I got he following advise from a great photographer who took pity on me:

    ‘Pick one film, one developer, one paper and work them over
    and over again, until you have a true feeling for how they work individually and in combination with each other.’


    This may sound a bit pragmatic, but it is good advice, and if it makes you feel too limited, try two each. The point is that an arsenal of too many material alternatives is often just an impatient response to disappointing initial attempts or immature and inconsistent technique. Unless you thrive on endless trial and error techniques, or enjoy experimentation with different materials in general, it is far better to improve craftsmanship and final results with repeated practice and meticulous record keeping for any given combination of proven materials, rather than blaming it possibly on the wrong material characteristics.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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