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  1. #1

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    How to use close up filters.

    I just picked up a nice set of Kenko's (+1,+2,+4) in a local swap meet.Is there a certain technique I should be following to get the most out of these filters?

    Thank You

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Just screw one (or more) on and focus as normal, they just let you move in closer than normal. No need for exposure compensation. You will need to move toward or away from your subject to find the focus range.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  3. #3
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    Perhaps more than you wanted to know but it might be worth a read.

    http://imaginatorium.org/stuff/cufilter.htm
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  4. #4

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    This is cool, I actually hadn't heard of close up filters before. It looks like a good alternative to getting a new telephoto lens. I've been dabbling in food photography lately, so I'm glad to have found out about these.

  5. #5
    BobD's Avatar
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    You'll probably get better results at similar cost by using an extension tube
    or reverse adapter (assuming your camera uses interchangeable lenses).

    Most screw-on closeup lenses are single-element type optics and have poor
    correction often producing color separation and other aberrations.

    The 2-element type screw-on closeup lenses such as those made by Nikon and
    Canon are quite good but rather expensive usually.

  6. #6
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobD View Post
    Most screw-on closeup lenses are single-element type optics and have poor correction often producing color separation.
    Clarification of terms:
    Read 'chromatic abberation', i.e. not focusing various colors at the same plane, creating a 'color fringing' effect.
    This is not 'color separation', which is a method of creating separate B&W negatives for red, green, and blue portions of the spectrum.

    Lee

  7. #7
    AgX
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    I did not even know that something as close up filters exist...

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    I did not even know that something as close up filters exist...
    My neither.

    Fascinating, though, how people can devise something that filters out distance. You just can't help but sit back in awe, and wonder what's next.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobD View Post
    You'll probably get better results at similar cost by using an extension tube
    or reverse adapter (assuming your camera uses interchangeable lenses).

    Most screw-on closeup lenses are single-element type optics and have poor
    correction often producing color separation and other aberrations.

    The 2-element type screw-on closeup lenses such as those made by Nikon and
    Canon are quite good but rather expensive usually.
    I've found that you can remove the front element of some cheap tele-zoom lenses (which is usually an achromatic doublet) and fit it in the casing of a cheap UV filter (after you remove the UV glass), creating a really cheap and rather well corrected doublet closeup lens. I've not done extensive testing as to how well this actually works, since I don't really do macrophotography, but I can't see any chromatic aberration on the one test shot I did with it.

  10. #10
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Be very careful letting direct light hit the elements, most closeup lenses will flare badly. a lens shade is a good idea if it doesn't interfere with getting close enough.
    Gary Beasley

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