Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,276   Posts: 1,534,763   Online: 860
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Dunedin,New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    269
    Opinions obviously vary, but IMHO the 105 Nikkor gives a more pleasing perspective for head and shoulders work. Any of the 2.5's will do, they are all gorgeous.

  2. #12
    Eric Rose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Calgary AB, Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    4,242
    Images
    73
    If it were me I would us a combination of a 90mm f2 Summicron pre asph and a 50mm f2 Summicron again pre asph.

    The Nikkor's are great, I have them and used them for model shoots but for what you are doing I think the look of the Leitz glass will be more pleasing.
    www.ericrose.com
    yourbaddog.com

    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

    "The Dude abides" - the Dude

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Portland. Oregon USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    30
    People are suggesting the "traditional' head and shoulders portrait length, ignoring that the pictures will involve showing two people and their life together. I agree with Flying Camera that a wider approach is more productive, and would suggest starting the project with a 35 or 50 before putting out money for a lens you may not need -- particularly if you are very comfortable already with shorter lengths. The lenses everyone mentions are good ones but are possibly not necessary.

  4. #14
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,372
    Images
    4
    I second the recommendation for using a reflector. Reflectors are not intrusive. Carry a couple lighting stands and spring clamps to hold the reflector. Don't use a flash of any sort with old folks, their eyes don't take kindly to it and it shows up cataracts. Shoot with a tripod and a cable release. Engage your subject as you take their picture - something that is hard to do when your face is hidden behind a camera.

    The 85mm f2 Nikkor is an excellent lens and available at sane prices. Buying an expensive lens for this purpose is a waste of money. I find a 100 or longer lens a problem in most interiors. Don't be surprised if you need to revert to a 50mm to get enough 'space' in the picture. Try a few shoots with a 50 - you may find it is all the lens you need. Shoot at f2.0 - f4.0, the limited depth of field will help hide wrinkles. It is a good idea to check your camera's focusing accuracy - if you are an inch or so off the portraits won't look good with fuzzy eyes and perfectly focused double chins.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 05-12-2010 at 10:22 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  5. #15
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    What everyone has said, thus far, is true. Here are my two cents: an overly sharp lens is not necessary. Longer than 90mm is too long for window portraits. High speed is important.

    My set-up for such-as-your-project is an 85mm f/2.0 USSR Jupiter-8 lens with an M42 to Nikon adapter.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  6. #16
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,240
    Images
    148
    I'd get a 90mm f2 Summicron for the Leica as Eric suggests, a great camera for portraits, but a 50mm is also excellent for portraits and 35mm whereyou want moreof the environment in shot.

    With people the Leica is easier than an SLR, you have constant view, can see whats just out of frame, work in lower light levels hand held, etc.

    Ian

  7. #17
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    The Nikon line has wonderful options for available light.

    Consider the fabulous Nikon 105/1.8 for tight, flattering, short-tele shots, with a comfortable, nonintrusive standoff from the subject(s). If you want wider/environmental, consider the 50/1.2. I like the dreamy out of focus elements and softer contrast, and the normal field of view works well for shots including just enough environment to frame the subject while not becoming a distraction.

    I understand the favourable opinions on the 85s... for me that field of view is usually neither wide nor tight enough to catch my eye, but that's all very individual of course. It might work perfectly for you and your subject(s).

    Anyone with a lot of, uh, character on their faces, you probably don't want to go with any of the superduper high contrast modern lenses. There's no hard rule, of course, and you should do what you want... and it's almost impossible for us to give good advice without knowing the character of your subject. You have to decide how best to bring that out... and maybe you need a holga, whatever!
    Last edited by keithwms; 05-12-2010 at 11:25 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire, UK.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,184
    Thanks for all the tips so far. This project will be a challenge, indeed. I'll be photographing from people from 2 years old up to 90! I don't think I can use the same style for every subject.
    Steve.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oakdale, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    261
    I have a slight bias as I have an 85/f2. I kept a Nikon body so I could keep using this lens.

    Reflectors and try to use a north facing window. If the weather permits, try shooting outdoors against a north wall.

    This sounds like a great project. Good luck.

    Mike

  10. #20
    Leighgion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Orcas Island, WA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    357
    Images
    16
    Another vote here for the 85mm f2 AIS. It's quite inexpensive and a good performer. Maybe not "the best" but I've never had cause to complain about mine.

    You can always have a second, wider lens along to adapt to circumstances. No reason you need to settle on one lens to do the whole long project.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin