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  1. #11
    Wade D's Avatar
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    Looks like a light leak/shutter problem to me. There's also a capacitor that goes bad on the Minolta X series cameras which affects the shutter. When it fails completely the camera locks up. I have 2 X-700's that had this problem but fixed them myself by installing a new capacitor. Not hard to do. Micro Tools has the part.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wade D View Post
    Looks like a light leak/shutter problem to me. There's also a capacitor that goes bad on the Minolta X series cameras which affects the shutter. When it fails completely the camera locks up. I have 2 X-700's that had this problem but fixed them myself by installing a new capacitor. Not hard to do. Micro Tools has the part.
    Hmm. I have one is just this state and wouldn't mind attempting a repair. Can you share some details?

    Thanks,
    Ulysses

  3. #13
    Wade D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ulysses View Post
    Hmm. I have one is just this state and wouldn't mind attempting a repair. Can you share some details?

    Thanks,
    Ulysses
    The part is a 4v 220micro farad capacitor. Remove the bottom plate of the camera and you'll see it. Using a low heat soldering iron carefully unsolder the 2 connections.
    Some soldering irons get way too hot and may damage the other electronics. Once the old one is removed solder the new one in the same exact position so the base plate will fit down snug again. Don't try to force the base plate down before the capacitor is properly positioned as this may damage the other electronic parts.
    I was leery of trying this myself but when I saw how easy it was and how cheap the part is it was a great way to save my 2 X-700's.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wade D View Post
    The part is a 4v 220micro farad capacitor. Remove the bottom plate of the camera and you'll see it. Using a low heat soldering iron carefully unsolder the 2 connections.
    Some soldering irons get way too hot and may damage the other electronics. Once the old one is removed solder the new one in the same exact position so the base plate will fit down snug again. Don't try to force the base plate down before the capacitor is properly positioned as this may damage the other electronic parts.
    I was leery of trying this myself but when I saw how easy it was and how cheap the part is it was a great way to save my 2 X-700's.
    Thanks, I'll give it a try. I've done a solder job or two in my time...

    Ulysses
    Last edited by ulysses; 05-15-2010 at 10:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
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    Ugh. On removing the base I find cold solder joints on the cap (which shows signs of leakage) and corrosion on the traces of the PC board it's attached to. I'll probably replace the cap, but I expect that I'll have to hand solder some wires in to replace the corroded traces on the circuit board. I figure the odds of it actually working again are fifty-fifty, but worth the cost of the new cap.

    Ulysses.

  6. #16

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    I see two problems.

    I think those that see two problems, light leak and a hanging shutter are correct. I doubt that it is due to the capicator problem that X-700's are known for. The X-700 uses a little different method to release its shutter than most cameras. I don't know if Minolta invented this but when the shutter is cocked, a permanent magnet holds the curtain open. Many other cameras used a latch of some kind. When you trip the shutter, the capicators supply a jolt of juice to the permanent magnet and that releases the shutter because the magnet is no longer magnetized. (At least for a second.) I would take the lense off of the camera and hold a piece of cardboard over most of the openning where the film would go, and trip the shutter. (Leave a one millimeter slit.) You should see light. Then hold it over the other side and see if you see light. Then tape two pieces of cardboard together leaving a millimeter or so slit of light in the middle. Trip the shutter a few times and see if it shows light. You should see about the same amount of light in each slot. If you are not seeing any light, or twice the amount, then you have problems with a sticking shutter. I think a CLA is needed. I have two X-700's and one I bought new in 1985 and it has been in the shop once in 25 years. The other one I bought on ebay and had it repaired and cla'ed shortly after I bought it. They are a great camera. RJT.

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