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  1. #21
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I've got ton's of equipment too , but recently have just been carrying one body a Canon FD 28-85 f4 lens in a Lowepro Top loader Zoom case, and considering the miles I've carried loads of gear in the past and not used it, I wonder why I never did it before.
    Ben

  2. #22

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    One way to lose weight would be to carry a cheapo rebel camera body, such as a Ti or T2. I have never used a high end canon camera, and I understand that they are "better" in some ways. However, the lower end cameras have a rather complete feature set, and in most situations I doubt if the higher end camera would make much difference in the results.

    And, the rebels are much lighter.

    (Let the flame wars begin.)

  3. #23
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    I think you know that the motor is dead weight and should be a no brainer to remove if reducing weight is your aim.

    I would also reconsider both of the zooms and switch to fixed-length lenses. Personally, I find that the disadvantages of zooms pretty heartily outweigh their benefits, unless I happen to be stuck in one location (an assigned location in a group of photographers, for instance). I generally prefer to have three bodies with primes to two bodies with zooms or even one body with a zoom. Lighter, faster, smaller, more simple, arguably better image quality, and definitely "nicer" image qualities to my eyes.

    Canon makes some very good and reasonably priced fixed-length lenses. 24mm 2.8, 28mm 1.8 and 2.8, 50mm 1.4, 85mm 1.8, 100mm 2.0, 100mm macro, and on the pricier side of things, 135mm 2.0 L, 200mm 2.8 L, 300mm 4.0 L. There is also the 70-200 4.0 L, which IME is a good lens, is significantly smaller and lighter than the 2.8, and is very affordable.

    Personally, I like to always work with at least two bodies when I am "seriously" shooting. I might sell both zooms and get another body, a 70-200 4.0 L (IS or pre-IS), a 28, and a 50.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #24
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    My own take would be, is Canon EOS even the right system for you?
    What are your priorities? What is it you like/need about the EOS system?
    It's aimed at PJs (and wannabe PJs), with an emphasis on features and speed. Including fast lenses. No 200mm f/4.0 for example.

    Some examples from other systems:
    Nikon Fe2 + 20 +35 f/2.0 + 105 f/2.5 + 200 f/4.0 = 2.123 kg (1.846 if you drop the 20mm you seem to have no use for). All some of the best primes Nikkor has.
    Nikon Fe2 + 20 +35 + 105 + 180 f/2.8 ED = 2.392 kg (2.115 with no 20mm).
    Leica M6 + 15 + 21 + 35 f/2.0 + 90 f/2.8 = 1.274 kg. Probaly not for you as teles stop at 135mm.
    Rolleiflex SL35-E + 18 + 35 f/2.8 + 85 f/2.8 + 200 f/4.0 = 1,904 kg. (1.546 without the 18mm). The Zeiss lenses are superb (no comparison to zooms).

    So, do you need light and good, or is the "need for speed" more important?
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  5. #25
    cmo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    My own take would be, is Canon EOS even the right system for you?
    What are your priorities? What is it you like/need about the EOS system?
    It's aimed at PJs (and wannabe PJs), with an emphasis on features and speed. Including fast lenses. No 200mm f/4.0 for example.

    Some examples from other systems:
    Nikon Fe2 + 20 +35 f/2.0 + 105 f/2.5 + 200 f/4.0 = 2.123 kg (1.846 if you drop the 20mm you seem to have no use for). All some of the best primes Nikkor has.
    Nikon Fe2 + 20 +35 + 105 + 180 f/2.8 ED = 2.392 kg (2.115 with no 20mm).
    Leica M6 + 15 + 21 + 35 f/2.0 + 90 f/2.8 = 1.274 kg. Probaly not for you as teles stop at 135mm.
    Rolleiflex SL35-E + 18 + 35 f/2.8 + 85 f/2.8 + 200 f/4.0 = 1,904 kg. (1.546 without the 18mm). The Zeiss lenses are superb (no comparison to zooms).

    So, do you need light and good, or is the "need for speed" more important?
    Interesting idea. I do own a complete Leica M equipment, and I use it a lot, mainly for street photography, but the telephoto capabilities are somewhat limited. Unfortunately the Visoflexes were never developed to a level that made them the first choice for action photography: no TTL metering, even with an M7 in AE mode you have to guess a lot, not to mention AF. Myself and many other photographers could simply forget about SLRs if Leitz had developed better mirror boxes (or Nikon, Canon and others that made mirror boxes for their rangefinder cameras).

    I use the EOS for everything where AF or telephoto lenses are important, and in bad weather. What I really like about the EOS and it's "L" lenses is the very fast and reliable autofocus, the weather sealing and, for telephoto lenses, the stabilizer. What I dislike are weight, need for heavy batteries, and that it is not simple to focus manually. It has too many too small buttons, and using "Custom Functions" is something that everybody should try once in his life to see how stupid a camera manufacturer can be: open a latch at the side of the camera, press a button as small as a pinhead, look at the lcd display, rotate a wheel until it shows "CF-12" and "0", then press that small button again, the "0" changes to "1". Believe it or not, this is the procedure to engage (or disengage) mirror lockup :rolleyes:

    Nikons are much more logical. In the 80s - I was a full-time PJ - I owned a Nikon FM with the loudest motor money can buy, an F3 plus motor, 24, 50, 105 and 80-210 lenses, and I remember it felt heavy, too :-) But going back to manual focus and non-stabilizer telephoto lenses...? I must say I am too lazy for that, and I would have to carry a tripod more often.
    The future belongs to the few of us still willing to get our hands smell like fixing bath.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmo View Post
    Interesting idea. I do own a complete Leica M equipment, and I use it a lot, mainly for street photography, but the telephoto capabilities are somewhat limited. Unfortunately the Visoflexes were never developed to a level that made them the first choice for action photography: no TTL metering, even with an M7 in AE mode you have to guess a lot, not to mention AF. Myself and many other photographers could simply forget about SLRs if Leitz had developed better mirror boxes (or Nikon, Canon and others that made mirror boxes for their rangefinder cameras).

    I use the EOS for everything where AF or telephoto lenses are important, and in bad weather. What I really like about the EOS and it's "L" lenses is the very fast and reliable autofocus, the weather sealing and, for telephoto lenses, the stabilizer. What I dislike are weight, need for heavy batteries, and that it is not simple to focus manually. It has too many too small buttons, and using "Custom Functions" is something that everybody should try once in his life to see how stupid a camera manufacturer can be: open a latch at the side of the camera, press a button as small as a pinhead, look at the lcd display, rotate a wheel until it shows "CF-12" and "0", then press that small button again, the "0" changes to "1". Believe it or not, this is the procedure to engage (or disengage) mirror lockup :rolleyes:

    Nikons are much more logical. In the 80s - I was a full-time PJ - I owned a Nikon FM with the loudest motor money can buy, an F3 plus motor, 24, 50, 105 and 80-210 lenses, and I remember it felt heavy, too :-) But going back to manual focus and non-stabilizer telephoto lenses...? I must say I am too lazy for that, and I would have to carry a tripod more often.
    Hmmm, weather sealing and stuff... forget my suggestion of using Rebel cameras.

  7. #27
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    If you don't like the way Canon has employed tiny little buttons to alter custom functions, then how, as an engineer, would you get around this? Truth be told, many people have been asked this question and cannot fathom an answer that is logically credible in terms of systemic layout and functional design. Credit where due the EOS 1N was a significant design breakthrough over its FD predecessor (T90) upon which electronics and system was based) and the system (particularly the EOS 1N) does have a number of quirks (e.g. the custom functions and metering mode display). True, people with big fingers do have difficulty negotiating the palm-door buttons, but they'll also have difficulty with many other controls: the buttons on the top, the manual-rewind button (itself recessed) proximity of focus point selection and AEL button (the function of which can be changed ie. to act as AF start, like the shutter button). It's not possible to design one camera to fit all types of photographer and their whims, of course.

    If there was something I would change of the EOS system, it would be getting rid of "image stabilisation" across the range and getting rid of the silly, expensive CR205 batteries. Weather sealing is excellent on all pro-level models, but problems have been spoken of with the 24-105mm IS L lens.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #28
    SilverGlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    If you don't like the way Canon has employed tiny little buttons to alter custom functions, then how, as an engineer, would you get around this? Truth be told, many people have been asked this question and cannot fathom an answer that is logically credible in terms of systemic layout and functional design. Credit where due the EOS 1N was a significant design breakthrough over its FD predecessor (T90) upon which electronics and system was based) and the system (particularly the EOS 1N) does have a number of quirks (e.g. the custom functions and metering mode display). True, people with big fingers do have difficulty negotiating the palm-door buttons, but they'll also have difficulty with many other controls: the buttons on the top, the manual-rewind button (itself recessed) proximity of focus point selection and AEL button (the function of which can be changed ie. to act as AF start, like the shutter button). It's not possible to design one camera to fit all types of photographer and their whims, of course.

    If there was something I would change of the EOS system, it would be getting rid of "image stabilisation" across the range and getting rid of the silly, expensive CR205 batteries. Weather sealing is excellent on all pro-level models, but problems have been spoken of with the 24-105mm IS L lens.
    Why would you suggest getting rid of Image Stabilization? It is fantastic, and depending upon lens model can give you 3-4 stops of stability over hand holding. IS works great, and is quiet. I have IS on several lenses.
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  9. #29
    cmo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    If you don't like the way Canon has employed tiny little buttons to alter custom functions, then how, as an engineer, would you get around this?
    Make bigger buttons? Did you ever try using these buttons in winter? I have got hands like a piano player and dislike these buttons. Is the next step that they put them inside the film chamber, under a hood with a tiny padlock?

    The first measure would be to fire Rube Goldberg as the director of the ergonomics department in Canon's R&D group... here is the new idea from Canon for a ground-breaking remote control:

    http://www.pxleyes.com/images/contes...afcf_hires.jpg

    People buy Canon (D)SLRs because of the great IS and telephoto lenses, the good AF and weather sealing, but probably not because they make such 'wonderful' wide-angles and kafkaesque custom function ergonomics.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    If there was something I would change of the EOS system, it would be getting rid of "image stabilisation" across the range and getting rid of the silly, expensive CR205 batteries.
    But why? I love stabilized lenses, because I can often leave the tripod at home. If I had the money and a baggage porter I would buy a 500/f4, one of the sharpest lenses ever made.

    I got rid of the 2CR5 batteries by using rechargeable AAs in the power booster. As I will sell that one soon I will buy a rechargeable 2CR5 and a charger for it.
    The future belongs to the few of us still willing to get our hands smell like fixing bath.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Get a 50/1.4 and use your feet.
    Hmm, I have always found that my hands were better for holding cameras but, hey, do whatever works best for you!

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