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Thread: 35mm SLR - why?

  1. #61

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    Simply put, the one argument that will brush anything else aside:

    BECAUSE I CAN!
    :-))

  2. #62
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    I bought a D300s recently to cover the "fast and automatic" stuff. Otherwise I shoot medium format or rangefinders. The D300s is terrific, but I'm finding that it's not much fun. I'm not sure if it's the digital part or the SLR part I'm struggling with. To find out, I ordered a minty F100. It's "Full frame," has good meter, fast focus, and tough build. It's basically the D300s without the convenience or decent high ISO capability. I like film, which is why I think (I hope) the F100 will be more fun.

    Besides, I paid $200 for the F100, which is $1500 less than the D300s. That's a lot less.

  3. #63
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    I shoot with my Canon EOS 1v film SLR 99% of the time; and shoot with my Canon EOS 5D DSLR 1% of the time.

    Why?

    Simple: Because film provides 1.5 to 2 stops wider Dynamic Range, and tonal graduations and color are better to my eye with film.

    I don't hate digital, and frankly I have the utmost respect for digital as a medium. However I have a strong preference for film.

    Now when it comes to resolution, a full frame 21mp DSLR kills 35mm film, but regardless, I'd rather shoot with 35mm film. To me, dynamic range and tonal quality are more important.
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Let me add (or restate) one more reason to get a film slr: I think it is very comforting to use a tool that I understand completely, down to the last screw. It might be the scientist in me, but I don't like to use black boxes and then have to wonder how much of my photograph is me and how much is some algorithm in the black box. You can become the master of a black box, even a current dSLR, but as a solid state physicist, I don't like the black boxiness one bit, and it bugs me to use something that is designed to think for me. So when I need my d$lr, I go out with every damn feature turned off, using my old manual nikkors It's kinda ridiculous... but hey Nikon never asked me what 'features' I can live without :rolleyes:
    Black box help is not so bad. At the end of the day, it still takes the human to compose the picture, and composition is the one thing that no camera can do for us. Still, the journey (camera workflow) is half the reward (the picture) for many, and I understand that.
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    ...most people coming from digital will be used to quite a bit of automation....

    -NT
    This is mostly false, what you wrote.

    You have this dillusion that somehow a DSLR is more "automated" then an SLR.

    Where did you get this wrong information?

    My Canon EOS 1v SLR is just as "automatic" as most DSLR's! The major difference is that one captures the light on film and the other an Analog (not digital) sensor.

    Both bodies have Av, Tv, P, M, and both can operate full manual or full auto.

    So no, a DSLR use will not have to make do with less automation if he goes to shooting film.
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  6. #66

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    Why? Film. It gives me a physical image, not a computer file comprised of 1s and 0s.

  7. #67

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    (on my point that digital emigres will be accustomed to automation)

    Quote Originally Posted by SilverGlow View Post
    This is mostly false, what you wrote.

    You have this dillusion that somehow a DSLR is more "automated" then an SLR.
    No, that's not my point. You're taking one statement out of context---what I said is that the various automatic bells and whistles of a high-end SLR aren't strictly necessary, but are probably expected features for most people coming from digital. Which is one reason that a digital emigre might want to use one of those cameras.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  8. #68
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    On this subject of automation, sometimes auto is the sensible choice. I am not against automation when I want it.

    What annoys me is that there is no really simple, beater d$lr that compares to my fm2n or oly om1 or xa or such- simple, inexpensive little pieces that I can take with me into knee deep saltwater without a care... and still expect topnotch results.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  9. #69
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverGlow View Post
    Black box help is not so bad.
    Yeah, an experienced photographer will have a vision and that vision will rise above pretty much any technical encumbrances. The vision exists completely apart from the gear.

    <rant>

    But, as a teacher, I assert that black boxes are the absolute enemy of education. I am just old enough to have participated in the transition from pencil 'n paper education to computer- and web-based learning. I did both, and I definitely felt the difference. It horrifies me how we (teachers) have thrown hands-on "analogue" learning away. And this is usually done to save money, effort and time rather than for any real educational benefit. I see very clear evidence of the harms of automation in the d$lr-based photography of today.

    </end rant>
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #70
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    But, as a teacher, I assert that black boxes are the absolute enemy of education
    I slightly disagree. Black boxes change the perspective of education so that the old handraulic ways are used to check/justify the new, but are not necessarily used as the primary means of calculating/using whatever it is we are talking about.

    Two examples:- I am old enough to have navigated merchant ships just using a sextant and log tables etc. Sat Nav didn't exist. You HAD to get the longhand calcs right or you were potentially on the rocks. I am sure they still teach this, but it is no longer the primary method. Navigators now navigate using electronic aids and have to learn all the new techniques surrounding the high tech equipment. So in effect they have to learn *more* - both the old ways and the new. Similarly my son is studying structural engineering. He is having to learn structural calculations long hand from basic mechanical principles. he will *never* do this in the real world - computers do it all using complex programs which he will have to learn how to use.

    Surely it is the same with photography? To be a truly competent professional (not that I am) in today's photography world, you have to understand both the old ways *and* the new d****l ways, so surely more has to be learned, not less?



 

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