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Thread: 35mm SLR - why?

  1. #81

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    Maybe I didn't make myself clear earlier:

    I choose to use my F5 specifically because it uses film. It also has features that I desire in a hand camera, the combination of which, I cannot find in any other model in the Nikon line, save maybe the F6, which is a bit out of my price range. The F100 might also be an option, but it too, is a "bell-and-whistleful" SLR.

    My question (again) is, why not use one? If you desire a camera that will use all of Nikon's current lenses (even the G-series), then you're pretty much stuck with all the bells and whistles. The same (to a degree) is true of Canon's lineup. Considering you can get a 1N for $200 and a 1V for $500, why not spring for something rugged and responsive?

    -R

  2. #82

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    You can destroy negatives in a fire or with scissors

    you can destroy image files with data corruption or deletion

    Troll post

    move along
    Last edited by TheSohnly; 06-08-2010 at 10:11 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: sandbags are useful for stopping flooding
    Toledo Camera Trader and photojournalist

  3. #83

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    The OP certainly did ask "Why a film SLR over a DSLR?"

    Specifically: "But what advantages, if any, would one choose to shoot a late-model full-featured film SLR over the d-word equivalent?"

    Hence my answer: "Film. It gives me a physical image, not a computer file comprised of 1s and 0s."

    You can't ask why someone chooses a film SLR over a DSLR and demand that the principal differentiating feature be excluded from the conversation.

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    (on my point that digital emigres will be accustomed to automation)



    No, that's not my point. You're taking one statement out of context---what I said is that the various automatic bells and whistles of a high-end SLR aren't strictly necessary, but are probably expected features for most people coming from digital. Which is one reason that a digital emigre might want to use one of those cameras.

    -NT
    Ok, I gotcha this time :-)

    I love most of the advanced features of my EOS 1v SLR and my DSLR's too...making the switching from one body to the other easy.
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  5. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    Folks, the OP explicitly wasn't asking "why film rather than digital", but "why a spiffy bell-and-whistleful film SLR rather than some other film camera". I assume we all agree that there are lots of reasons to shoot film!

    -NT
    Yes! That's what I was asking. Shooting film goes without saying. It's the reasons for shooting the particular sub-category of camera I'm curious about. I'm trying to imagine a digital-born-and-raised photographer who says "hmm, film…I want to try it." There are so many reasons to shoot film, and different cameras fit those different needs. I was having trouble (less so now, after lots of good replies) imagining that newbie selecting a modern SLR as his/her "film exposing device". I had been thinking the leap from digital to film must be based on a rejection of the entire digital experience, which in many ways is super-automated. This of course was due to my limited thinking.

    OT but worth a mention: free film giveaway here. http://www.camerasandfilm.com/archives/169

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Yeah, an experienced photographer will have a vision and that vision will rise above pretty much any technical encumbrances. The vision exists completely apart from the gear.

    <rant>

    But, as a teacher, I assert that black boxes are the absolute enemy of education. I am just old enough to have participated in the transition from pencil 'n paper education to computer- and web-based learning. I did both, and I definitely felt the difference. It horrifies me how we (teachers) have thrown hands-on "analogue" learning away. And this is usually done to save money, effort and time rather than for any real educational benefit. I see very clear evidence of the harms of automation in the d$lr-based photography of today.

    </end rant>
    I will agree with you that automation can be bad for learning; during the learning process. But at some point that educational track must show how automation can be used to the benefit of the photographer's vision; late in the curriculum.

    A case in point to this is the fact that the majority of SLR & DSLR shooters will shoot in P mode 100% or near that often, and place all aspects of the camera workflow in full automatic....and they've done this for years and even decades....this auto mode shooting has held them back from learning anything the entire time...imagine shooting an SLR for 20 years and the amount of learning is akin to taking the first year twenty times! There are high end DSLR/SLR shooters that may as well own a P & S model for the way they use their high tech high end gear....and they are often so proud of their "baby"....what a waste of resources!

    In my own journey, my learning didn't turbo into high gear until I started shooting in full manual mode, and using the best practices that Canon (in my case) has outlined in several white papers. Another reason I have gotten good with camera workflow is that I did a lot of learning with a DSLR, which gave me immediate feedback to whatever set up I was playing with. This immediate feedback can turbo charge one's learning fast...then I took those learned lessons and applied many of them to analog shooting, and for this reason I feel very confident about manual exposure when shooting with a film body...I no longer need an LCD to confirm the results....but I don't begrudge DSLR shooters for their LCD either, as is the case with many film nazi's.

    For me, the final frountier is composition....anyone can be taught to master camera workflow, composition is the hardest aspect of photography, and the one thing most of us will never master. I myself have a lot of opportunity for improvement in composition, which I find the greatest challenge.
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  7. #87
    rjbuzzclick's Avatar
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    Personally, I prefer the feel of a mechanical camera over one with menus and automation. When I do shoot digital, I use a manual focus, manual aperture lens, and run the camera on Manual Mode 99% of the time.
    Reid

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rjbuzzclick/

    "If I had a nickel for every time I had to replace a camera battery, I'd be able to get the #@%&$ battery cover off!" -Me

  8. #88
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    I'll just add that ceding some decisions to a modern, highly automated body can be cathartic. I generally enjoy working more deliberatively and manually, and 'fast' for me is an rb67. But sometimes I get stuck in a rut, the gear feels like its taken over the creative process, and scenes seem simply to pass by, right and left. At that point, going out with my f100 is helpful. The f100 takes care of (almost!) all the technicals and it's just instinct, don;t even have to bother too much with framing the shot. So I am certainly not one to diss aperture priority or matrix metering or focus tracking and such; without tools like that, there are some shots that simply cannot be taken, at least not reliably.

    Silverglow, I think we are in general agreement, I carefully composed that disclaimer at the topic of the section you quoted
    Last edited by keithwms; 06-09-2010 at 03:01 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    I'll just add that ceding some decisions to a modern, highly automated body can be cathartic. I generally enjoy working more deliberatively and manually, and 'fast' for me is an rb67. But sometimes I get stuck in a rut, the gear feels like its taken over the creative process, and scenes seem simply to pass by, right and left. At that point, going out with my f100 is helpful. The f100 takes care of (almost!) all the technicals and it's just instinct, don;t even have to bother too much with framing the shot. So I am certainly not one to diss aperture priority or matrix metering or focus tracking and such; without tools like that, there are some shots that simply cannot be taken, at least not reliably.

    Silverglow, I think we are in general agreement, I carefully composed that disclaimer at the topic of the section you quoted
    Where can one find a forum on composing? I realize one can find threads dedicated to certain genre's such as portraits, landscapes, street, the list goes on....but none of these really discuss composition directly...the elements of a picture, etc...even those specialized threads are still too hardware centric...
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  10. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverGlow View Post
    I love most of the advanced features of my EOS 1v SLR and my DSLR's too...making the switching from one body to the other easy.
    How do you feel about the EOS-3 mentioned in your signature? I've been thinking about picking one up precisely in order to have a more automated film body (e.g., for flash use) and a film platform for my EF lenses, but I don't have a very good idea of what it would be like in use.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
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    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_



 

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