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  1. #21
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Good morning, Marty Ryan and FilmOnly;

    Regarding the Minolta 1.4/58 lens; the question of an internal glass element in the lens having a radioactive (ionizing radiation) characteristic is valid. The early versions of this lens did have glass with that characteristic, but at a very low level, similar to the Pentax 1.4/50 lenses. If you store them in a case for a long time, you might see a yellow cast to the color of the lens when you take it out. Put it in a place where ultraviolet (UV) radiation can pass through it, and the yellow color cast will go away. A southern exposure window sill will do fine.

    And, in spite of the recommendations of Sir Thomas Lehrer, no, you do not need to wear lead BVDs when using this lens.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  2. #22
    martyryan's Avatar
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    I was aware that some of the 58mm 1.2 lens had the radioactive element but was under the impression that none of the 1.4 lens had this characteristic. But I am hardly an expert on the entire Minolta line.

    Marty

  3. #23

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    I received my XE-7 as a graduation present in June, 1977. It has needed repairs over the years (most recently to the aperature transfer ring) but it is still going strong. The lenses are fabulous as well. For a 30 year old camera and kit it is still a pleasure to use.

  4. #24

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    I have no intention of debating the radioactivity issue here. All I would like to verify is if the MC 58/1.4 is actually radioactive. I have heard all of the arguments, and prefer to err on the side of caution, especially since there are many fine 35mm lenses out there.

  5. #25
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Good morning, FilmOnly;

    I had written a reply to you discussing the amount of ionizing radiation that you will get from a Minolta MC ROKKOR 1:1.4 f=58mm lens, but I realized that there will be no real profit in doing that, so I deleted that reply.

    If you are truly concerned about the lens in that way, send a PM to me and tell me what you want for it and what it will cost to ship it to Washington, ZIP Code 98012.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  6. #26

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    Love the XE-7

    I used to shoot with Minolta cameras in the 80s and early 90s before giving up the hobby. Back then I had an SRT 200 and later added an X-570, along with an MD Rokkor 45/2 and a K-Mart Focal 135/2.8 (Kiron made, I think). I got the zoom bug in the early 90s and bought a Kiron 80-200/4.5 and quickly lost interest in photography as my pictures started to suck.

    I recently got back into the hobby with digital (Sony A850 full frame and NEX7 compact), and then in a quest for exceptional portrait lenses for the NEX7, bought into the Leica R system.

    Long story, I got a Leica R3 MOT with a 50/2 Summicron for only $30 more than the lens alone and rather than use the lens on the Sony NEX, started buying film. I grew my Leica system to now include 2 bodies (R3 MOT and R6) and 4 lenses (35, 50, 90 and 138, all f2.8). It was only when looking at Leica wide angles and learning that the Elmarit 24/2.8 was actually a rebranded Rokkor that I decided to go back to Minolta.

    I am so glad that I did. For under $400 (about 2/3 the price of the Leica-branded Rokkor 24) I was able to buy a mint XE-7, a very nice X-570 and five nice Rokkor lenses (MC 28/2.5, MD 35/2.8, MD 45/2, MC 58/1.4 and MC 135/2.8). The XE-7 is every bit as nice as the R3 with the exception of lacking spot metering. Otherwise, they are functionally identical, though the R3's black surface appears far more durable.

    Using the Minolta gear is like coming home. Outstanding lenses and the camera is simply luxurious.

  7. #27

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    Just read the June 1975 Modern Photography review of the XE-7 and it extolled the smoothness and quietness of the camera. I've always said the XE-7 has to be experienced. But beware, you might think there is something wrong with your camera after trying out the XE-7 . . .

  8. #28
    mweintraub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Les Sarile View Post
    Just read the June 1975 Modern Photography review of the XE-7 and it extolled the smoothness and quietness of the camera. I've always said the XE-7 has to be experienced. But beware, you might think there is something wrong with your camera after trying out the XE-7 . . .
    You're not wrong! I had an XE-7 that had metering issues. I didn't want to mess with it so I sold it. I still have the XE-5 and the smoothness of winding is something to experience.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Javins View Post
    Good morning, FilmOnly;

    Yes, the XE-7 with the electronic controlled shutter is nice. Yes, it is also quiet. A nice camera.

    The MC ROKKOR 1:1.4 f=50mm is a good lens. It will focus down to just under 18 inches, but you might like the results better if you get a reversing ring and turn it around, especially if you want to go closer. For more serious macro work, look at the MC MACRO ROKKOR 1:3.5 f=50mm lens. That one will down to about 9 inches and a full 1:1. If you need to go closer, look at the AUTO BELLOWS ROKKOR 1:4 f=100mm bellows lens.

    No, the mirror does not go into a Mirror Lock Up mode if you set the self timer. I do not think that any of the Minolta cameras from the XE series and onward had an MLU. They did bring it back on a couple of models of the AF cameras. If you need that feature, go back to the SR-T series or the SR-7. Many of them, but not all even in the same model designation, had the rotating MLU control on the side of the lens mount just below the shutter speed dial. The SR-T 102 is one model where it may or it may not have the MLU. Look at the camera lens mount on the side.

    One point of the XE-7 are the batteries. The camera does require batteries to work. There are two (2) and you will run them down if you leave the camera on when putting it away. Turn the camera OFF when it is not being used, and you will enjoy normal camera battery life.
    Minolta considered that the shutter and mirror braking mechanism was so vibration free that mirror lock was unnecesasery .
    Ben

  10. #30
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    But boy, my XE-7 still scares small children at the faster shutter speeds. Kerrrrr-LUNK

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