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  1. #1

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    My first SLR: Nikon F100...helpful tips?

    Hi All,

    I've always been interested in photography, but always never had a chance to buying a slr since I thought they were so expensive. But I've recently bought a Nikon F100 with a Nikkor 50mm AF f1.8D! I'm pretty excited about it as it's coming in the mail in a few days. A few questions:

    -Is there any basic film slr books you guys recommend? (i need something that will teach me about the iso, different films to use, how to change the film canister)!

    -What about any good online articles on film slrs in general? I've found alot on dslrs but barely any on film slrs!

    -Since I'm going to buy it used, how should I test the slr for any problems? Are there any specific things I should test on the camera?

    -How do you guys process your film the cheapest? I was thinking of just having my film developed and getting the digital copy of it for now.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Hello- Welcolme to the world of photography with an SLR...and with film no less! The benefits of a camera like this one are really, really, amazing. You best ways to test the camera would be to shoot a roll of film through it and see how it comes out ....If there huge problems with the camera, it should be evident in the images that it gives. I would reccomend finding a copy of the camera manual since the F100 is a pretty advanced camera. As far as procssing goes, you may want to check the local telephone book to see if any photo labs are around. If not, there are plenty of reccomendations that I as well as others on here would have as to good mail oder labs. If you are trying to keep costs down then I suppose that developing and having scans made would be a good way to go. Have fun and feel free to come back with specific camera questions. We are here to help each other out. I can't seem to think of any great articles for you off hand but I just found this. http://www.guidetofilmphotography.com/ I hope it is helpful.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  3. #3
    Mats_A's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG and congratulations on a fine camera.

    You really should start by reading the manual, cover to cover. You can find onehere

    If you are not going to develope your own film then start with color negative films. Ie "normal films".

    Regarding handling and general camera usage a digital camera functions the same way as an analog regarding shutter, aperture lenses and so on. So read any article you want. You always learn something.
    And take pictures, lot of them.
    And have fun.

    r

    Mats
    Digital is for communication, film is for documentation.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/studiopirilo

  4. #4
    haplo602's Avatar
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    Get the book from Thom Hogan. Get a cheap film scanner for 35mm. Get the battery grip :-)

    I had this camera for a few years and it's an excelent piece of kit. Do watch how you close the film back, the latches tend to break if not carefull.

  5. #5

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    The National Geographic Photography Field Guide is one of the best introductions to photography I've read. It covers pretty much everything and the rest of the book has some good articles on different styles and types of shooting.

    In any case, everything you read online or in print about ISO, f-stops, aperture, shutter speeds and all the principles of photography is valid for any camera, be it film, digital, large format and compact.

    Also, if you are going to get film processed, cheap is not always the best, it can make a huge difference on the prints where you get them processed. So take your time and be prepared to spend a bit of money until you try different labs and find one you like.
    Hasselblad, Mamiya RB, Nikonos, Canon EOS

  6. #6

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    Read Galen Rowell's books. He was a pioneer of 35mm landscape photography and i have learnt quite a lot from his books. His earlier book "Mountain Light" is probably the most informative.

    He also used the F100 extensively in his later years, preferring it to heavier, more advanced cameras (F5)

    Try a roll of slide film and have it processed at a pro lab. You will never look back!

  7. #7
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Congratulations!

    Just stick around here and you will learn everything you need to know about using the F100, minor repairs and to whom to send it if it needs a CLA [Clear Lubricate and Adjust] or a bigger repair.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #8
    vedmak's Avatar
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    F100 is a great camera, I am particulary interested in black and white film since you can have control over the entire process, it is inexpensive, and more forgiving than slides, although with nikon metering system exposure errors are not as common. My library consists of just 8 books, 5 of those are by Ansel Adams (the saint), 2 from Carson Graves -> zone system for 35mm photographers, The elements of black-and-white printing, and last but not least The Darkroom Cookbook, Third Edition by Stephen G. Anchell - make sure you do get third edition, it has some interesting articles about developing black and white slides out of negative film and pyro developers.

  9. #9

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    After my FM10, the F100 was my first "professional looking" camera. I hope that you enjoy it, beacuse after years of owning mine, I know I still get great use out of it.

    I second getting the battery grip, it is a very useful item for adding some weight and stability in your hands.

    Books: There are a lot fo them. The NatGeo guide is great, that was my first book and it served me well. Another great book that you will learn from to no end is "Photography" by John Upton, Barbara London, and Jim Stone. I have a 'pre-jim stone' 6th edition, they are currently on the 9th edition, but whichever you choose, you will get a lot of information out of it.

    Oh- If you havent gotten idea to do this yet, start now, but shoot as many types of films as you can-- There will probably never be as many films available on the market now as there will be in the future.

    All the best
    M. David Farrell, Jr.

    ----------------------------------------------
    ~Buying a Nikon doesn not make you a photographer. It makes you a Nikon owner!

    ~Everybody has a photographic memory, but not everybody has film!

  10. #10
    ruilourosa's Avatar
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    basic photography, read it... not just download it...
    vive la resistance!

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