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  1. #1

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    Which Filter for Cloudbursts

    It's summer here in Florida and I am constantly seeing cloudbursts in the distance. I am seeking advice on which filter to use with B & W film to make the image pop with contrast and detail. I will use HP5 with my Hasselblad & 40mm lens.

    Thank you

  2. #2
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    In my bag I carry a variety of filters, what I find is that there isn't just one that works in a given situation.

    The various colors just highlight different things.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #3
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    I keep a yellow filter on nearly all the time and thats usually sufficient. At times I change out to other colors, depending on what I want to achieve. You are going to have to make your own test shots to determine what works for your style. Run a series of shots using yellow, orange, red, and see which is to your liking. I also stack a polarizer with yellow or orange for extra drama, but the results are dependant on the actual atmospheric conditions.
    Rick A
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  4. #4

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    a deep yellow is often enough. Using orange or red (even worse) can make the print really gritty looking. But it depends on the sky colour and how much humidity is in the air. The less humid the better and if the sky is a really deep blue then a yellow or deep yello will be enough. But if the sky is a pale blue then you need more filter (orange or red) to darken it.
    Expose for the clouds and not the shadows. Set cloud highlight on zone 7 to 8 which gives you some room to increase contrast a tad of room in the printing stage if you need to up contrast without losing detail.
    Don't forget to apply filter factor.

  5. #5

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    Sometimes, you can use a polarizing filter. But generally a medium- or deep-yellow filter will do it.

  6. #6
    Rick A's Avatar
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    While you are running your tests, be sure to make very good friends with a sturdy tripod and cable release. Slow speed film, darkening skies and slow shutter speed coupled with small apertures, makes for awesome panoramas.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Inayat Noor View Post
    It's summer here in Florida and I am constantly seeing cloudbursts in the distance. I am seeking advice on which filter to use with B & W film to make the image pop with contrast and detail. I will use HP5 with my Hasselblad & 40mm lens.

    Thank you
    Try using some Ilford SFX too with a deep yellow filter!

  8. #8

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    Thank you all for the excellent advice. Expecially putting the clouds in Zone 7. I spot meter thru my filters and will experiment with various filters.

    Again, many thanks.

  9. #9

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    metering through a 25 red which is a tri colour filter will give you a false reading. With yellow filters you should be OK cos the filter factor is much less but as a rule I use the filter factor rather than metering through filter which can throw off the reading depending on which filter it is.

  10. #10
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    ..metering through a 25 red which is a tri colour filter will give you a false reading.
    I was under the impression meters don't see color, just light intensity. Can you explain the above a bit more?
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

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