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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The Kodak Stereo How To books were written by Pete Chiesa, one of the all time greats in the field of stereo photography. He took many photos and used his projector to bring stereo to us all. Pete was a very nice person and I was very proud to have worked with him on and off over the years.

    If you get a chance, get one of his books or get copies of some of his photos.

    PE

  2. #12

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    Thanks for the info and the views. I seem to be leaning towards the Revere 33 or a TDC Stereo Colorist II. They both have a rangefinder and a top finder. Anyone ever use one?

    I think the Realist's ergonomics may be a bit rough to get use to. While I love Kodak film, internet research says that most Kodak stereo cameras have busted shutters and I have generally found Kodak cameras to be junk (except the Retina). While I love MF, I think I want to dip my toe in with 35mm.

    I'm leaning towards using slide film. Any special tools for mounting?


    Quote Originally Posted by roboflick View Post
    I would buy a stereo realist from Dr T on bay( george themelis).
    Good reference. Thanks!
    Last edited by chris00nj; 07-17-2010 at 11:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
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    Dont forget the View Master.

    There are a lot of VM disks out there.



    PE

  4. #14

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    Send an email to Dr T he will set you up with everything you need. I would suggest you start with a film cutter I like the realist model compact and you just cut every 5 perfs. Small light table and realist sorting box you will also need rbt mounts. And a red button viewer. I like astia 100 f for people incredibly grain free and natural color. And velvia 100 for scenery and flowers

  5. #15

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    Don't be put off by the reported complexity of the realist. One gets into a routine after a few rolls and it becomes automatic. Dr t book is helpful in this regard. Plus you get a camera with a reliable shutter and sturdy build. These cameras were extremely overbuilt. I love mine.

  6. #16
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    I've played on and off with stereo for years, and have owned most of the cameras mentioned....

    The Stereo Realist is a quirky camera to use, but once you get the hang of them they produce excellent results. For the price I would also recommend talking with George (DR T) on ebay - I would recommend his books on 3D as well (no matter which camera you get) - they are well written, and provide lots of info on how to use the cameras and present 3D photos.

    On the subject of presentation I actually scan my negs/trasperancies, and create blue/red anaglyphs which you can view with "3D" glasses - great for sending to peope - plus you can easily post them on line for people to see in 3D..the software was a free download from the web - if you want to know more PM me..

    But I digress. Kodak stereo's cameras are also excellent - if you get one that has a good working shutter then you will love it - sharp results, easy to use, proper wind and rewind knobs with levers (rewinding a stereo realist is not fun..). They may only have 4 shutter speeds, but they do have a spiriti level in the viewfinder to help you keep things level..

    Sputnik - I love my Sputnik - even though you really need to go over them first before using them: replace the original Russian tractor grease in the focussing helicoids with something that actually lets the lenses focus, recalibrate the focus on the lenses, paint the inside of the camera mat black (or stick some sort of flocking in). The small focussing spot (the small groundglass bit on the middle of the viewfinder) can be difficult to see, but it is accurate...shutter speeds are limited...but you do get 6 big stereo images per roll.....and you can customise them to no end - replace the focus screen, mount a prism, and you have a camera almost as good as the new Chinese 120 TLR (triple lens) stereo camera you can get from Dr T for $1600 (or is it more now??)

    Revere - again a nice camera - full range of shutter speeds, but the viewfinder is tiny andn very hard to see through.....but then again you do get a coupled range/viewfinder - great for action shots..

    If you just want to try a bit of stereo first to see if you enjoy it get a Argus 3D/Loreo 3D camera - it's a compact 35mm with a built in beam splitter that takes 2 side by side photos on standard 35mm print film - when you get the photos back you just pop them in the included viewer and look at them in glorious 3D...

    As people have suggested you will need slow film for shooting stereo - I use Velvia 50 in 35mm and Agfa APX 100 in 120...(and 400 ISO print in the Loreo)

    Any stereo slide viewer will do - I have a brumberg, a realist, a Graflex plus a copuple of others - all light up and seem to work well, although the ones where you can adjust the seperation between the eyepieces are easier for some people to use..

    What I would suggest is when you are starting out get some easy load slide mounts - the kind you slide the film chips into through slots cut out in them - the advantage of these is you can move the chips around to get correct alignment for the best 3D affect...once you get the hang of film mounting you can change over to RBT mounts, or the cheaper fold over mounts that Dr T has (these are the ones I use).

    Also get a film cutter - cutting your slides with square edges makes mounting much easier....

    I don't know where you are, but there may be a local 3D club who can help you - it's surprising how many there are around the world..and they love to talk 3D with anyone who'll listen....and no - I'm not one of them!

    Have fun!
    A camera is only a black box with a hole in it....

    my blog...some film, some digital http://andrewk1965.wordpress.com/

  7. #17
    Andrew K's Avatar
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    Forogt to metion - the TDC cameras have a habbit of breaking their take up spools (or maybe it's jsut someting we saw here in Australia??) but most of the ones I've seen have been repaired in some way (not an easy repair).

    The local 3D club here would recommend a Stereo Realist or a Kodak.

    I also forgot to mention the Fed Boy - the Russian 3D camera form the 80's. I have one, and mine works great - sharp photos, great AUTO exposure...and really easy to use...

    You probably won't miss having a rangefinder, as you tend to work at f8 or smaller to get the best 3D results...things look a bit funny ot of focus in 3D :-)
    A camera is only a black box with a hole in it....

    my blog...some film, some digital http://andrewk1965.wordpress.com/

  8. #18

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    Well if you want to go cheap, get a Nishika 8000. There are tons of these things around so they sell for less than the Lomos, and the outer pair of lenses have decent stereo separation. The 1/2 frame format will also cause less confusion for processing and you get get mounts compatible with most viewers. Compared to the Lomo, you also get a whopping 3 apertures to choose from and a little light to tell you to use flash. (Yes, that's all the AA batteries do; the "LCD" on the top is just a sticker.) Oh, and a lead weight and psuedo-SLR styling to make it look like a more serious and expensive camera ;-)

  9. #19

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    I like the realists, but my favorite is the viewmaster. It must be nostalgia, but I love viewmaster reels and I find everyone knows what they are. Viewmaster is my little wedding trick. If I go to a wedding, the bride gets a viewmaster reel and a viewer.

  10. #20
    edp
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    I've mentioned my Sputnik before, and now I have a chance to do it again.

    Get a Sputnik! It'll need a complete overhaul, but once it's prepared for use you won't want to stop using it. The slides really are the next-best thing to being there.

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