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  1. #11
    paulfish4570's Avatar
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    If your son would like to experiment with a variety of focal lengths without breaking the bank, I recommend an SLR in the M42 thread mount line. There are Spotmatics and their cousins galore all over e-bay, plus the Fujica ST605 and ST701 series, and any number of other stalwart M42 bodies; M42 lenses tend to run less in cost than most of the bayonet mounts. I bought a Pentax SP1000 for $28, then spent $73 for a complete CLA and seals. It should last another 50 years.
    As for rangefinders, there are bargains galore among fixed lens/leaf shutter rangefinders by Konica, Minolta, Yashica and others. For interchangeable all-mechanical mount cameras, there are the classic Leicas, the Bessa R, Zeiss Ikon, older classic Canons and Nikons.
    You could spend $800-$1,000 real quick on a used M3 and 50 Summicron. You could spend $800 on a CLA'd M42 body or two, 7-8 lenses, enlarger, developing tank, containers, film, chemicals, timer ...

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    A Canon Ftb.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I recommend the Canon F-1 since you already have a system started. My first choice, if you were starting from scratch would be an Olympus OM-1. Light weight solid quality and Zuiko lenses are some of the finest ever made.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  4. #14

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    my $.02: Spotmatic. The bodies hold up really well, the glass is awesome. M42 lenses are still affordable and new ones are still being made. A Spotmatic IIP and a 50mm f/1.4 SMC Takumar, a 50 foot spool of Tri-X. What more could a person need?

  5. #15
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    Whatever the final decision may be.
    Please Remember To Include The :
    Sekonic L-398A Studio Deluxe III
    "Classic" Analog Light Meter for Battery-Free Ambient Light Readings, Incident & Reflected


    Ron

    From The Long Island Of New York, and the
    Long Island @ Large Format Group, right here on APUG
    .

    __________________________________________________ ________________________________________________


    Sanjay Sen - APUG Subscriber
    Sanjay Sen, 36, a champion of human and animal rights, died June 3 in a motorcycle accident in Wayne, New Jersey.

    July 23 1975 - June 3 2012

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________

  6. #16
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Since he is already shooting Canon FD:

    Canon F-1 (one of the '70s models)
    Canon FTb
    Canon TX
    Canon TLb (same as TX, but no flash hot shoe)

    ...pretty much in order of decreasing "awesomeness" and decreasing price.

    My personal suggestion would be the FTb. It is the best value of the lot, i.e. the most full featured for the least money. The F-1 is the most full featured, is slightly preferable for a few reasons, and has the best build quality. However, don't let that make you think that any of the others are anything to sneeze at in terms of build quality. If you can get a nice, perfectly-working F-1 for $150 or under, I'd go for it, because that is a good deal. Otherwise, I'd suggest a sub-$100 (possibly sub-$50) FTb for now, and upgrading to an F-1 later if the need arises.

    Oh, yeah, and see this guy's statement:

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron LarFor4X5 View Post
    Whatever the final decision may be.
    Please Remember To Include The :
    Sekonic L-398A Studio Deluxe III
    "Classic" Analog Light Meter for Battery-Free Ambient Light Readings, Incident & Reflected


    Ron

    From The Long Island Of New York, and the
    Long Island @ Large Format Group, right here on APUG
    .
    I thoroughly agree.

    P.S. The main real-world difference between these cameras, in most people's use, is simply the top shutter speed. It is '2000 on the F-1, '1000 on the FTb, and '500 on the other two. Yet another reason I like the F-1 and FTb better than the other two. My most commonly-used shutter speeds on 35mm cameras are '500 and '1000.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 07-20-2010 at 07:03 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: added P.S.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #17

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    Go with the Canon F-1, a workhorse for sure.

    Jeff

  8. #18
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    If he is going to be a professional photographer he will, eventually, need a current system where the same lenses can be used on film and digital bodies and are available in autofocus. The two professional 35mm systems are Canon EOS and Nikon. It may make sense to switch to one of these systems now and cut your loses rather than stay with the obsolete, though still functional, Canon breech-mount system. Canon's current EOS system is not compatible with their older lens system so there is only sentimental reason to stay with Canon. As Nikon has kept the same lens mount since 1957 there is a huge selection of compatible Nikon accessories available on the used market at very reasonable prices.

    Any good professional level body from Nikon or Canon can be used on full manual. Buying a manual-only camera would not be a wise choice as it will be restrictive in the long run when he will need the system to make a living and productivity will be the name of the game. Good film choices are the Canon EOS1 and the Nikon F5. The Nikon F4 is perfectly serviceable and quite cheap used, the F6 is still current and expensive. I am not as familiar with Canon and the various flavors of their professional bodies.

    All that said, 35mm is only a professional medium outside of photojournalism in its digital form. Commercial photography is still a medium format game.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 07-20-2010 at 07:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  9. #19
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    How about learning photography before deciding whether or not to be a professional photographer?

    The Canon FD system will assist this education quite well, and will always be able to deliver professional-quality results on 35mm film.

    I understand the comments, but I don't buy into the idea that an orphaned system is not worth pursuing.

    There is no need to worry about what digital system you will eventually buy into. For now, just learn photography. If you get good at it, everything will sort itself out...but until you are good at it, you just need a good, simple, camera that is capable of excellent results, and that requires a lot from you. If I had started with Canon EOS instead of Canon FD, there is no way I would have learned as much, as well, as quickly, or as enjoyably. Now, I use FD and EOS, and both have been well worth the money invested.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  10. #20

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    I will throw in my two cents and suggest a couple of classic fully manual workhorses, the Yashica TL Electro X and the Minolta SRT101. Both are extremely rugged, durable cameras, with TTL metering, full mirror lockup and depth of field preview. The SRT101 can be had for a song on ebay right now, and can use any Minolta MC and MD mount lenses, which are both plentiful and affordable, while the Yashica uses the venerable M42 screw mount lens.
    Last edited by elcabezagrande; 07-20-2010 at 11:40 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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