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  1. #1
    Hal
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    Minolta SR-T Dilemma

    Hi APUG,

    Just hoping for some advice on a dilemma I'm facing; on Saturday, after much searching, I finally found what seemed to me the perfect camera for my own "1 camera, 1 lens, 1 film, 1 year" project (starting mid-September when I head to university). It was a nearly pristine SR-T 101 and came with a metal-barreled 55m f1.7 lens. Everything seems smooth and works as it should, including the meter.

    Now, the problem; I find it more difficult than I expected to focus using the microprism in medium to dim indoor lighting. The potential cure, which I discovered today, is an SR-T 303b (202 in America), for sale at the local camera shop for €15, which has a split-image rangefinder (and aperture read-out in the viewfinder) but a non-functioning meter; how difficult is exposure without a meter (anyone have any good online resources)? I know that many people work this way, but if it takes a long time to learn then I'm not sure I feel like spending several months (or more) out of my year learning how and losing shots in the mean-time.

    If anyone has any opinion on this, I'd be glad to hear it.

  2. #2
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Actually, I think Steve may have gotten one right for once. Look, you'll be focusing wide open and shooting perhaps a little opened up in most of those conditions, anyway. The DOF should make any very slight focal errors more than acceptable, right?
    Thank you.
    -CW

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  3. #3
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    (Arms upright)
    Thank you.
    -CW

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  4. #4
    Lee L's Avatar
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  5. #5
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    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

  6. #6
    altair's Avatar
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    Stop relying on in-camera meters and get a handheld meter, you'll be much happier that way, plus your exposures will be better. I was told this when I first started out, didnt pay it no mind then. But now I know its true. So, get the 202. If not, the 101 will be just fine. It just takes time and practice.

  7. #7
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    I would keep the SRT-101. At the least try shooting a roll with a microprism and with a split-image screen - you may find you like the microprism after all.

    The best things to focus on with a microprism are specular reflections, areas of large texture or high-contrast demarcations. Move the camera back and forth slightly while focusing - if the image is out of focus it will sparkle/break-up, if it is in focus it will remain steady.

    The best screen combines a split-image with a microprism. If I have to live with only one I prefer a microprism. A split-image screen invariably has the prism in the wrong orientation - some screens have the prism at 45 degrees but this isn't a panacea.

    As far as metering is concerned it is a good idea to have a working behind-the-lens meter. You can always use a hand-held meter if you want. A behind the lens meter is very, very useful - that's why all modern SLR's have them.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 08-31-2010 at 01:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  8. #8
    BobD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal View Post
    Hi APUG,

    Just hoping for some advice on a dilemma I'm facing; on Saturday, after much searching, I finally found what seemed to me the perfect camera for my own "1 camera, 1 lens, 1 film, 1 year" project (starting mid-September when I head to university). It was a nearly pristine SR-T 101 and came with a metal-barreled 55m f1.7 lens. Everything seems smooth and works as it should, including the meter.

    Now, the problem; I find it more difficult than I expected to focus using the microprism in medium to dim indoor lighting. The potential cure, which I discovered today, is an SR-T 303b (202 in America), for sale at the local camera shop for €15, which has a split-image rangefinder (and aperture read-out in the viewfinder) but a non-functioning meter; how difficult is exposure without a meter (anyone have any good online resources)? I know that many people work this way, but if it takes a long time to learn then I'm not sure I feel like spending several months (or more) out of my year learning how and losing shots in the mean-time.

    If anyone has any opinion on this, I'd be glad to hear it.
    Just get a hand held meter.

  9. #9
    fotch's Avatar
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    While I prefer a hand held meter, I would only want a fully working camera. Like owning an auto without lights or maybe no reverse, why would you want to invest in junk. Its not worth fixing either. Find a working example that has all its functions, there are plenty of them out there, unless your in a camera dessert.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  10. #10
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    While a hand-held meter has many advantages and is quite easy to use (at least basically - Zone system readings are another ballgame), I find that them fiddly and slower to use than a built-in meter.

    It's an extra piece of equipment you have to carry, store, take out and protect, which kind of defeats a light & fast 1 camera + 1 lens concept.

    If you're working slowly and methodically (and maybe with a tripod), a hand-hled meter can be brilliant.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

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