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  1. #1
    Hal
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    Minolta SR-T Dilemma

    Hi APUG,

    Just hoping for some advice on a dilemma I'm facing; on Saturday, after much searching, I finally found what seemed to me the perfect camera for my own "1 camera, 1 lens, 1 film, 1 year" project (starting mid-September when I head to university). It was a nearly pristine SR-T 101 and came with a metal-barreled 55m f1.7 lens. Everything seems smooth and works as it should, including the meter.

    Now, the problem; I find it more difficult than I expected to focus using the microprism in medium to dim indoor lighting. The potential cure, which I discovered today, is an SR-T 303b (202 in America), for sale at the local camera shop for €15, which has a split-image rangefinder (and aperture read-out in the viewfinder) but a non-functioning meter; how difficult is exposure without a meter (anyone have any good online resources)? I know that many people work this way, but if it takes a long time to learn then I'm not sure I feel like spending several months (or more) out of my year learning how and losing shots in the mean-time.

    If anyone has any opinion on this, I'd be glad to hear it.

  2. #2
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Focus back and forth quickly and you will find the right spot much faster.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #3
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Actually, I think Steve may have gotten one right for once. Look, you'll be focusing wide open and shooting perhaps a little opened up in most of those conditions, anyway. The DOF should make any very slight focal errors more than acceptable, right?
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  4. #4
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    Actually, I think Steve may have gotten one right for once. ...
    Chris, how would you like to be drop kicked through the uprights?
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #5
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    (Arms upright)
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  6. #6
    Lee L's Avatar
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  7. #7
    dehk's Avatar
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    - Derek
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  8. #8
    altair's Avatar
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    Stop relying on in-camera meters and get a handheld meter, you'll be much happier that way, plus your exposures will be better. I was told this when I first started out, didnt pay it no mind then. But now I know its true. So, get the 202. If not, the 101 will be just fine. It just takes time and practice.

  9. #9
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    I would keep the SRT-101. At the least try shooting a roll with a microprism and with a split-image screen - you may find you like the microprism after all.

    The best things to focus on with a microprism are specular reflections, areas of large texture or high-contrast demarcations. Move the camera back and forth slightly while focusing - if the image is out of focus it will sparkle/break-up, if it is in focus it will remain steady.

    The best screen combines a split-image with a microprism. If I have to live with only one I prefer a microprism. A split-image screen invariably has the prism in the wrong orientation - some screens have the prism at 45 degrees but this isn't a panacea.

    As far as metering is concerned it is a good idea to have a working behind-the-lens meter. You can always use a hand-held meter if you want. A behind the lens meter is very, very useful - that's why all modern SLR's have them.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 08-31-2010 at 12:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  10. #10
    BobD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal View Post
    Hi APUG,

    Just hoping for some advice on a dilemma I'm facing; on Saturday, after much searching, I finally found what seemed to me the perfect camera for my own "1 camera, 1 lens, 1 film, 1 year" project (starting mid-September when I head to university). It was a nearly pristine SR-T 101 and came with a metal-barreled 55m f1.7 lens. Everything seems smooth and works as it should, including the meter.

    Now, the problem; I find it more difficult than I expected to focus using the microprism in medium to dim indoor lighting. The potential cure, which I discovered today, is an SR-T 303b (202 in America), for sale at the local camera shop for €15, which has a split-image rangefinder (and aperture read-out in the viewfinder) but a non-functioning meter; how difficult is exposure without a meter (anyone have any good online resources)? I know that many people work this way, but if it takes a long time to learn then I'm not sure I feel like spending several months (or more) out of my year learning how and losing shots in the mean-time.

    If anyone has any opinion on this, I'd be glad to hear it.
    Just get a hand held meter.

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