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  1. #41
    lxdude's Avatar
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    I never did care for the "Magic Needles" in my Pentaxes. I much prefer the aggressive "gimmethegoddamfilm" attitude of the F3's slots with the honkin' big sprocket claws.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  2. #42
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kubach View Post
    If I have a hard time loading film in my camera, I use a sledge hammer!


    Jeff
    I think think you'll find Jeff that a sledge hammer is even harder to load, and takes crap pictures
    Ben

  3. #43
    lxdude's Avatar
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    But at least it won't break when you drop it. And they're easy to handle if you use your head.

    Plus you can do your own CLA's.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  4. #44

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    Hard to load cameras and tips

    Two cameras I use a lot and don't find very easy to load are the Minolta X-700 and the Canon F-1. I need two hands to push the leader into the spool far enough with the X-700 to make sure a pin is in one of the sprockets. The F-1N is easier to loan that the F-1 but I enjoy using the F-1 more. The Konica Autoreflex T2 has to be the easiest to load. I just push the leader into any slot and it's taken up nicely. The Nikkormat FT and early SRT 101s are also not as easy to load as later models. Any of the Canon QL cameras is easy to load as is the Konica FT-1.

  5. #45
    winger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey Kidwell View Post
    Loading my Pentax 6x7 is still the least graceful thing I do in life. And this isn't exactly a hijack of the 35mm thread. The 67 is kind of a big 35. With a shutter that scares children and wildlife for miles around.
    The 645N is pretty loud, too. I shot a wedding today with it and the groom (a photographer and a friend) commented on hearing it from 20 feet away.
    And if you think a camera is easy to load, try doing it in the dark to shoot HIE. I'm so out of practice - it took 3 tries to load the PZ1p last night.

  6. #46
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    A good way to teach yourself to load a camera easily and quickly is the way they teach you in the military to dismantle and re assemble a weapon, in the dark against the clock, try it, but be careful not to put your finger through the shutter , generally the secret is practice, practice, practice .
    Ben

  7. #47

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    Fs are great to load, because a damned hinged door doesn't get in your way when you are loading! Just hold the door in your teeth.

    I find the Barnack Leicas (and, I assume, other bottom-loading cameras without a back door) are the most difficult to load of all cameras I have used. They can certainly be reloaded in a reasonable amount of time, though. It takes me about a minute. The M series, with their back door, take care of the hardest part of loading the thread mount bodies, i.e. getting both rows of sprocket holes over their respective sprockets, and the film all the way down into the slot so that the image is not exposed onto the sprocket holes on one side, all while working blindly from the top. With the Ms, you just open the back door and position the film.

    Loading any 35mm SLR is easy as pie, IMHO. I don't see what is causing the problems with run-of-the-mill Nikons.

    The easiest loading cameras I have used are probably anything with the Canon QL system. Boy, do I wish the F-1s had included this feature.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
    Loading a Nikon F is a royal pain in the butt. Still love using this camera though.

    Jim B.
    It's even more of a pain in the butt when the Nikon F in question is an older model, with the single slot in the take up spool, and you have an F-36 motor and cordless battery pack dangling off the strap!

  9. #49
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I never had any problems loading the Nikon F when I had one, because I had been loading a Zeiss Contax since I was thirteen which also has a slide off removable back, and is almost identical except the Contax has a loose take up spool.
    Ben

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddym View Post

    But the best tip I ever heard was from a Pentax rep. Basically, he said to reverse the loading instructions: first, holding the open camera in your right hand and the film casette in your left, insert the leader into the takeup spool (yes, BEFORE you put the film cassette into the camera); then turn the spool with your thumb, wrapping the film around it securely; THEN pull the cassette back over to the left side of the camera and drop it into its place. Take the slack out with the rewind lever, close the back, and fire off a couple of frames... and you're done. Once you get the hang of this "backwards" technique, it is very fast and secure.
    While I have had more problems getting the automatics like my F100 and N75 to load on the first try than I ever have with my FM2, FE, or FE2, this sounds like a great tip. Definitely sounds simpler. Will give it a try.

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