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  1. #21
    drumlin's Avatar
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    The F4 does work with G lenses (but only in S and P modes, so limited). VR is not supported.
    I like the F4 because it's the rosetta stone of bodies that accepts and matrix meters with most lenses including AI/S lenses. That is, unless your throwing down the $$ for an F6,which is a fantastic camera...

    I just put an F4s up for sale here on APUG. Not sure if shipping to AUS wouldn't make it not so cost-effective though. Let me know if you're interested...

  2. #22
    zk-cessnaguy's Avatar
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    +1 for the F4. I adore mine. If I had to choose only one camera to keep out of all my kit (film and digi) it would be the F4.
    Mamiya 645 Super | Nikon F4/F100/FM2n | Minolta Maxxum 9/Dynax 7/X-700/X-500/XD7/SRT-101 | Pentax Spotmatic | Canonet QL 19 (GII) | and a whole bunch of glass

  3. #23
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    To me, it's really quite simple to decide. (For the record, I own both cameras.)

    Do you intend to rely frequently on autofocus (particularly with moving subjects)? If so, get the F100.

    If autofocus is something you might use but don't need to rely on, the F4 is better in many other ways and it's a very pleasant camera to use.

    The only other issue I might note is size and weight. The F100 is quite small and still not bad if you add the MB-15 battery pack (that adds a very useful vertical shutter release and ups the frame advance rate from 4.5 to 5.0 fps). The F4s/F4e (the most common F4 variants) are quite a bit larger. You can buy a battery pack to make the F4 smaller and lighter (a true F4 although most so-called F4 cameras are really s or e variants). However, the packs are rare and expensive. (I am still looking for one...)
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  4. #24
    John_Nikon_F's Avatar
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    Some F4's can have issues. Had one about three weeks ago that was an above 2500000 body. Would work fine for about 10-15 frames then act as if I'd fired it on "T". Have gone back to my 2265xxx body that I owned previously. Kept the newer finder, which updated the finder release lever to the double detent feature - the mod was done to the rail on the left side of the finder. The only other truly problematic F4 I've had was one I bought as a parts camera. Someone stuck their finger through the shutter and destroyed it. The LCD's do have bleed issues on some of the bodies. Seems to be more common with the 243xxxx-244xxxx bodies in my experience. Had three that had issues. With one of them, it was in the DP-20 only (and majorly so - half of the bottom LCD was black), so I found a decent DP-20, bought it, and replaced the bad one with it. The other two had minor bleed, but not enough to prevent usage of the camera in all modes.

    The pros for the F4:

    System camera, can be made big or small, depending on what you want, and has four different finders, plus a bunch of focusing screens.
    Will matrix meter with AI/AIS Nikkors, but not AI'd Nikkors, due to those lenses missing the lens speed post on the rear element baffle
    Traditional control layout without LCD's on the top cover
    Ability to manually rewind the camera
    T mode for long exposures without wearing the batteries down - can also be used for longterm storage, fire shutter on "T", wait a few seconds until click is heard, then move shutter speed dial off "T". Shutter is left uncocked, but mirror is locked up.
    100% viewfinder coverage, like all other F-series Nikons

    Cons:

    Will not work with G lenses in M or A modes
    Focus can be slow at times - lithium AA's help a lot
    Single focus point, compared to five for the F100

    F100 pros:

    Smaller package
    Newer with a more current interface
    Fully compatible with G lenses, except, of course with DX lenses, which won't do full-frame, obviously
    More advanced matrix metering system
    Backlit negative LCD display
    Five focusing points that light up in red and faster AF - can still get confused and hunt, though
    More advanced flash circuitry, similar to N90s, but with rear curtain sync controlled by camera, instead of flash
    10-pin remote socket that can also be used with other cables to download image data to a PDA or a computer, etc

    Cons:

    More electronics, even the DOF preview is motorized instead of a mechanical linkage as in earlier cameras
    Metering mode switch will eventually become tempermental
    No ADR, so no apertures in the viewfinder with non-AF Nikkors
    96% viewfinder coverage
    Rubberized covering, while it feels nicer, can get sticky after a while and sometimes needs to be reglued
    Centerweighted meter is closer to Nikon F3 in bias, so it's almost a spotmeter
    Aforementioned plastic rewind fork
    No manual override of rewinding
    Only two focusing screens, either the B or the E - is possible to modify an FM2n or FM3a screen to fit, however.

    Both cameras are nice. I have both, although, my F100 is the digi version, also known as the D1H.

    -J
    APUG: F4, F3P, F2ASx2, F
    DPUG: D200
    Nikkors: 18-70/3.5-4.5G AF-S DX (f/D200), 24/2.8 AI, 50/1.4 AI, 50/2 H, 85/1.8 K, 105/4 Micro AIS, 180/2.8 ED AIS, 300/4.5 ED AI

    My FB - My flickr stream
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  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by drumlin View Post
    The F4 does work with G lenses (but only in S and P modes, so limited).
    I can't think of any way to skew the program mode like with an F100...

  6. #26

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    I own both, the F4s looks better on the shelf and is more impressive to "play" with, but the f100 is a better camera to use.

    Also the f4's lcd screen is notoriously prone to bleeding. LCD technology was still fairly new when it was designed, the f100 does not have this issue.

    If you like the feel of a heavy camera, you should also consider the f5--like the f4 it's a camera that "feels like you mean business." The only problem with it is the hard to make out focus point selection, which they fixed with the f100. Focus point is selection is not a problem with the f4, as it only has one focus point.

  7. #27
    RMP-NikonPro's Avatar
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    I've an F100, F4 and a FM3a and I can never decide which one I love the most!!
    I just love Nikons!!

    Save your cash and buy them both
    Nikon user

    "Fate rarely calls upon us at a moment of our choosing" Optimus Prime

  8. #28

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    I stayed away from the F4 because of the size. Other than that, I think it would be a nice complement to the F100 as a do anything body. I love my F100 though.

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