Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,091   Posts: 1,612,471   Online: 1319
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38
  1. #21
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,628
    I also own an ME Super and a Super Program. A beginner can't go wrong with either of them, in my opinion.

    They both have various automatic modes and full-manual modes. You can use auto exposure when you just have to get the shot. You can use aperture priority mode when you want to focus on depth of field but not worry about shutter. You can go full-manual when you want to take the time to do it right.

    Shop around on eBay, et. al., and you might be able to find a ME Super or Super Program for $150 or less. If you're shrewd you might get one for under $100.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #22
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,815
    Quote Originally Posted by MikePenn View Post
    If you look around enough you should be able to find a camera lens combo for under $80.

    Olympus OM-1/2 (smallest )
    Pentax K1000 ( marked Asahi )
    Minolta SRT 101 ( built like a tank)
    Canon AE-1 ( watch out for squeal )
    Nikon FM (usually more expensive )
    I never heard of the OM-1/2. A half frame version I presume?

    I suppose it would be the smallest.
    Last edited by lxdude; 11-21-2010 at 01:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  3. #23
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,273
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    Thanks for raising the merc battery issue. Apart general decrepitude, many of the old SLRs mentioned above are a no-go because they need mercury oxide batteries--banned in 2000. For someone just starting out, AF Nikon bodies like the N90x(N90s) or cheaper 801s/8008s work beautifully as MF cameras: great viewfinders, centre-weighted/spot/matrix(with AF lenses) metering,motorized film advance. They're also years newer than the holy relics of SLR-dom that can be 40+ years old. I bought my last N90s in EXC+ shape in 2009 for $50.
    The mercury battery problem is easily solved:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum52/8...ml#post1092895
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #24
    mr rusty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    lancashire, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    658
    Images
    106
    Canon rebel Ti (300V in europe)

    http://www.camerapedia.org/wiki/Canon_EOS_Rebel_Ti

    auto/manual and they virtually come free with Canon EOS lenses - seriously, bodies only are peanuts.

  5. #25
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,616
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by mr rusty View Post
    Canon rebel Ti (300V in europe)

    http://www.camerapedia.org/wiki/Canon_EOS_Rebel_Ti

    auto/manual and they virtually come free with Canon EOS lenses - seriously, bodies only are peanuts.
    Maybe not peanuts but I bought a brand new Canon 300 last year for £10 ($16), and the seller had a box full of them.

    Ian

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    9
    Hi,

    I've been reading up on specifications and prices until I'm dizzy! I've taken the battery problem on board and concentrated on Nikons and Pentaxs as advised.

    First thing I found was that decent used digital slrs with full manual control are pretty expensive. (I'm in England by the way where everything is expensive). Second thing I found was that Nikons are dearer than Pentaxs which helped me make my mind up.

    Lots of Pentax models available and one good one seems to be overlooked. The P30T is described as a hidden gem and I can get a body, described as little used, for only about 40 bucks in your money. My guess is that this model was bought by amateurs unlike, say, the MX.

    I'm going to wait until one comes up attached to a 50mm prime lens. This combo won't be large and obtrusive, or too heavy, and, as it is supposed to approximate the human perspective, it should be good to learn on. That's my theory anyway but I'd welcome comments on this.

    I'll be able to post off the used film to a developing firm and get back the negatives and photos in about three days. No problem, I won't have forgotten where I took them by then. However, I can envisage wanting to computerise some of the shots but can't quite see the best way to do it.

    Do I scan the negatives or scan the photos? This is all in advance of myself of course as I don't have a scanner but I'm trying to get a perspective on the whole film scene. I can see that it could be very interesting. Reading the reviews of the cameras has enlightened me a little. Close the aperture down and you get a greater depth of field. As it gets dimmer, outdoors, you have to open up the aperture for more light and or give the shot longer exposure time. Or both. Hope I've got that right.....

    I appreciate the willingness of everybody to help by the way. I have an American tree in my garden, a Bishop pine which I grew from seed, and I'll post a snap of it with the Pentax as a sort of reward. Well, I like trees, anyway.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    575
    If you are looking at Pentax, here's a site you need:
    http://kmp.bdimitrov.de/index.html

    And a forum specific to Pentax film cameras-
    http://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/p...lr-discussion/

    The ME Super has a great viewfinder, takes SR44 and such batteries, and is very small and light while not being made of plastic. Having never seen a P30T, I cannot comment on it. The Pentax 50mm f1.7 lens is a near-classic, cheaper than the f1.4, and worth looking for over the 2.0.

    You might look over your digital files to see what '35mm equiv.' focal length you've ended using most often. Be prepared to buy a wider lens. I am doing tree shots for a local group and carry the equiv. of a 28mm, 40mm, and 75mm (working in APS-C, so that's a 21mm, 28mm, and 50mm actual) to cover most everything.

    Most places these days will do some sort of scanning of film if you want. Then you get a CD with files. A nice way to start, but your corner drugstore-level scans can be pretty bad.
    Last edited by Dan Daniel; 11-22-2010 at 02:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #28
    dehk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    W Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    889
    Just do a K1000.
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,455
    bettonbaby,
    A subtle hint for you. Prepare to duck when you mention the "D" word, few have survived.=)
    APUG also has a sister site, "hybridphoto" there's a link at the very top of the page.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  10. #30
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,815
    bettonbaby-

    I think you've made a good choice. I have a P3n, which is the same as the P30n. The P30t is the same camera with an angled split-image focus aid in the viewfinder instead of a horizontal one. It has a nice viewfinder (snappy but not as large or bright as the ME Super's), and is easy to operate. It's plasticky compared to a machine like the ME Super, but it has depth of field preview, an exposure hold button in automatic, and a conventional shutter speed dial, all of which the ME Super lack. The ME Super has a metal top, bottom, back, metal rewind shaft and knob, an exposure compensation dial, and push-button shutter speed changing. And a great viewfinder.
    I have an LX, MX, ME Super and P3n, and find each has its charms. The P3n gets used a lot and I rarely use automatic. When taking pictures of kids and and pets on auto I find the ability to quickly switch exposure modes just by changing aperture or shutter dial position is very useful, as is the ability to lock an exposure setting with the lock button.
    I think starting with a 50mm is a good idea. It's versatile and allows you to concentrate on your subject without thinking about which focal length to use, and is faster (has a larger aperture) than moderate wide to tele zooms. It focuses close, is very cheap and has fine image quality. After a while you will know what other focal lengths you will want. The P30t's DoF preview will help you avoid distracting backgrounds and see that you have good DoF when you want it.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin