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  1. #21
    dehk's Avatar
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    Niko FE, FE2, EM (M90) FM FM2 (all mechanical), and the list goes on and on and on.
    - Derek
    Looking for a parts prism for the Minolta XE / XE 7.

  2. #22

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    Les, right you are about the F3 having an LCD meter display, not LED. As for my comment re: FM3a, 'Fantastic camera in so many ways...except low-light meter reading', I was referring to the general inability of anyone to read the meter in low light since the meter is not illuminated. The meter, itself, has no problems metering low light.

    I'm unsure what to make of Derek's cryptic response. The original question asked which cameras offer both of the following features: 1) aperture priority, with batteries, of course and 2) the full range of all shutter speeds without batteries. Thus, none of the bodies Derek mentioned meet the criteria.

  3. #23

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    How about a solar powered SLR like the Ricoh ZR-S

  4. #24
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    Could somebody explain why in the twenty first century so many people most of whom are amateurs are so afraid of battery dependant cameras and light meters letting them down ? why can't they carry spare batteries ?
    Ben

  5. #25

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    Afraid to carry spare batteries . . . hardly.

    Here are some casual observations after years of ownership . . .
    1. Low battery can cause unpredictable behavior until they die completely.
    2. Shelf life of spares are unpredictable.
    3. Different batteries are not always available in a lot of places.
    4. Not everyone has one camera or uses one type of batteries.
    5. Batteries get discontinued.
    6. Need a coin to open the battery compartment in most cameras.
    7. Batteries left in can cause corrosion.
    8. Cold weather affects battery.
    9. One less thing to worry about.

    As already listed, some have designed minimal or no battery dependence which is a very good design accomplishment that not everyone has done.

    It is great to be able to say your camera can do without it but even better if you can properly expose film using the sunny 16 rule . . . ;-)

  6. #26

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    That's true. This is the age of the electronic gadget: phones, mp3 players, portable computers, portable dvd players, digital cameras and more. Everything dependent on battery power. It's become a way of life.

    What's interesting is what happens to people during a power outage.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Les Sarile View Post
    Afraid to carry spare batteries . . . hardly.

    Here are some casual observations after years of ownership . . .
    1. Low battery can cause unpredictable behavior until they die completely.
    2. Shelf life of spares are unpredictable.
    3. Different batteries are not always available in a lot of places.
    4. Not everyone has one camera or uses one type of batteries.
    5. Batteries get discontinued.
    6. Need a coin to open the battery compartment in most cameras.
    7. Batteries left in can cause corrosion.
    8. Cold weather affects battery.
    9. One less thing to worry about.

    As already listed, some have designed minimal or no battery dependence which is a very good design accomplishment that not everyone has done.

    It is great to be able to say your camera can do without it but even better if you can properly expose film using the sunny 16 rule . . . ;-)
    The majority of the points you make are pretty lame like " need a coin to open the battery compartment" and " one less thing to worry about" as far as I'm concerned the only legitimate concern that you have raised is about cold weather effecting the battery which I agree could be a problem in the very coldest months of the year.
    I disagree too about "sunny sixteen" ( which I learned to use more than fifty years ago) which is great to use in an emergency if you are without a light meter but to guess the exposure is IMO a sign of foolishness not wisdom if you have one because the human eye is a very poor instrument for evaluating illumination because it reacts to changing light too quickly.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 01-02-2011 at 01:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  8. #28

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    You obviously haven't seen a camera where the battery cover was badly scratched from someone who didn't have the proper size tool . . . ;-)

    My Minolta SRT-101 has a battery cover that doesn't require any tools at all but all my other cameras do.

  9. #29

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    Part of the resistance to battery powered cameras is the sheer diversity of power units to make them work. Some of the early AF cameras were so heavy on batteries and the unit cost so high, that cell price had to be factored in like film. Using my old F601s with on camera flash could blow a twelve pound battery on a roll and a half of film!

    As most of my photography is on 100ASA film I guess exposure on anything within hand held range pretty accurately, certainly as well as a non-spot metered camera. It's also partly that the light meter is the earliest component to pack up on ageing film cameras and correcting it expensive and fiddly when the camera works perfectly well without one and a hand held meter can be had fairly cheaply.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Les Sarile View Post
    You obviously haven't seen a camera where the battery cover was badly scratched from someone who didn't have the proper size tool . . . ;-)

    My Minolta SRT-101 has a battery cover that doesn't require any tools at all but all my other cameras do.

    I've seen more cameras in the twenty four years I managed camera stores than you've had hot dinners, most cameras only need a small coin to open the battery compartment, I own four cameras that are totally battery depentant, a Canon A1 in which I have only had to change the battery three times in twenty two years I have owned it, and three Canon T90 bodys that use 4 AA batteries can buy anywhere, I also have two modern digital lightmeters both of which use a single AA battery you can also buy anywhere.
    Ben

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