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  1. #21
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kubach View Post
    I've been out of focus most of my life!

    Jeff
    I sharp blow on the side of the head usually re-collimates the brain Jeff.
    Ben

  2. #22

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    You might be inviting a slight softening of the image if you have a filter on your lens without using a lens hood. For myself, no matter what I photograph, a protective lens hood is always present.

  3. #23
    Markster's Avatar
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    No lens filter, no hood either. I've pulled the trigger on a few more rolls of film, to arrive in about a week. Will begin some testing then. I guess I'll take some test shots with shallow DOF then some macro with almost no DOF then some "normal" comparison shots against the prime lenses I have.

    I guess the real test will be how well it stacks up to the 50mm f/1.8 that came with the camera.
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I sharp blow on the side of the head usually re-collimates the brain Jeff.
    !

    Jeff

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayGannon View Post
    Its actually a bad idea, most still zooms do not hold focus when zooming they have a lot of breathing, there are some noted exceptions (11-16 Tokina, 70-200 Nikon) but most do not hold their focus throughout the zoom range.
    Would a lens that does not hold focus when the focal length is changed truly be a zoom lens? I was always told that lenses that do this are technically called "variable focal length lenses," and that "zoom lenses" hold focus.

    As for the OP, are you asking whether the viewfinder image is an accurate way to judge the sharpness and other technical qualities of a lens? If so, I would say that it is not. Obviously you can see if something is in focus or not, and see obvious things like barrel distortion, but judging sharpness and other such things would be best done by looking at negatives and prints.

    There is always the possibility of misalignment of the focusing screen. (At least so on any camera that has a focusing screen!) When this happens, you get slightly different focus on the film than you do in the viewfinder.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 02-23-2011 at 02:27 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Would a lens that does not hold focus when the focal length is changed truly be a zoom lens? I was always told that lenses that do this are technically called "variable focal length lenses," and that "zoom lenses" hold focus.
    Ask the lens tech's and they will agree wholeheartedly, ask the marketing department and they will say 'What the hell is a variable focal length lens? Its a zoom ffs!'

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I sharp blow on the side of the head usually re-collimates the brain Jeff.
    Of course that's often what caused the problem in the first place!
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  8. #28
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    No one has brought up the possibility of human error. If one shoots with a fast lens, close to the subject, wide or nearly wide open, and has the bad habit of doing the Lock-Focus-Recompose dance, one will often get images that lack critical sharpness.

    Most Canon SLR's have multi-focus points and for good reason. It is best to use them, picking the best one manually for a given composition, and NOT recomposing after locking focus. This bad habit can often cause lenses to be thought of as "bad", as us humans hate to blame ourselves.

    Now of course, there does exist lenses that are out of calibration or just plain dogs.

    Additionally, doing the Lock-Focus-Recompose dance can cause metering issues, when using zoned/matrix metering mode. Not much good will come out of that bad practice.
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverGlow View Post
    No one has brought up the possibility of human error. If one shoots with a fast lens, close to the subject, wide or nearly wide open, and has the bad habit of doing the Lock-Focus-Recompose dance, one will often get images that lack critical sharpness.

    Most Canon SLR's have multi-focus points and for good reason. It is best to use them, picking the best one manually for a given composition, and NOT recomposing after locking focus. This bad habit can often cause lenses to be thought of as "bad", as us humans hate to blame ourselves.

    Now of course, there does exist lenses that are out of calibration or just plain dogs.

    Additionally, doing the Lock-Focus-Recompose dance can cause metering issues, when using zoned/matrix metering mode. Not much good will come out of that bad practice.
    Oh get off your high horse SilverGlow, this isn't a bad habit it's an advanced technique, well proven over time, and highly useful and if one is paying attention and if one is setting the camera manually or locking there's no exposure problem regardless of the metering method.

    In the skilled hands of someone who understands how to use it and has practiced this technique it is fast and accurate and beats the hell out of trying to switch focus dots in the middle of a quick series of shots.

    Hell in street and many other forms of people photography it's darn near the best way to be able to keep up and catch a great expression.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #30

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    I've been using focus-and-recompose for ever. I just cannot be bothered to play with focus points. I have never lost a single shot because of focus errors and I've had a lot of close-ups at f/1.4.
    Hasselblad 501CM, Mamiya RB67SD, Nikonos V, EOS 3

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