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  1. #11
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c.d.ewen View Post
    Still do: Micro-Tools.

    Charley
    .
    If I wasn't spending so much money on old broken cameras.
    I would be able to buy the Filter Vise !

    Thanks Charley, I definitely need that in my tool box !

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    Sanjay Sen, 36, a champion of human and animal rights, died June 3 in a motorcycle accident in Wayne, New Jersey.

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  2. #12

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    Here's a PM sent to me by a member on another forum (many thanks, Eric!), after another such discussion; I've found it excellent advice:

    Straightening a dent on a lens ring is like pounding out a dent on a car. My first inclination would be to get behind the fender and pound on the dent with a sledge hammer, but a good body man would lightly tap around the perimeter of the dent with a light-weight body hammer, forcing the raised metal down while pressing the dent out from behind. At least thatís the way they did it when fenders were heavier steel, and before bondo.

    On the lens, I first put a layer of tape, like electrical tape, on the outside of the lens to prevent any cosmetic damage. Then I put the spreader-vise on the lens (be careful to match the grooves in the vise) and tighten until itís snug, then tighten about a half-turn more. This will make the lens ring slightly oval shaped, with the dent still depressed. The objective is to gently tap on the outside of the lens ring, on both sides of the dent, to reduce the oval shape.

    I use a 2-oz. ball peen hammer with duct tape on the face to soften it, and swing gently with wrist action. Donít use much forceóuse wrist action and let the hammer do the work. Hold the lens in your other hand (to help absorb the blows) and tap on both sides of the dent. After about 10-20 taps, you will notice the spreader-vise getting looser, so tighten it back to itís original tension, and tap another 10-20 times to the side of the dent. The spreader-vise moves the dent out, and you tap the surrounding metal to reduce the oval shape.

    Iíve also tried the pliers, but in every case I messed up the lens worse. The pliers apply force in one small area, and the lens ring with have undulation showing where you applied the pliers. The spreader-vise always works better for me.



    BTW, if you do pick up one of those vises, you'll feel a bit ripped off at first - the thing is small and flimsy-feeling. It does work, however. The maximum spread is about 3 3/8". If you look carefully at the picture, you'll see that it can be used for smaller lenses with the top of the jaws, and larger ones with the bottom. Good luck.

    Charley

  3. #13
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    If I understood the OP right, he was talking about the filter ring on the camera/lens not the filter ring on the filter to be attached. If I understood this correctly, I would advise to not use any size hammer to fix the dent.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14

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    My understanding, also, Ralph, but a 2 oz hammer is not much of a hammer. I would hope anyone with a lick of sense would be judicious in their application of violence to a piece of glass.

    That said, I'll have to confess to taking a 2 LB ball peen to my 'collection' of 18" Veritos (4 1/2" dia), all of which had dents. I cut a well-fitting cradle out of hardwood (maple's good) with a large adjustable hole saw, rounded the end of a maple rod to fit the inside of the ring, and then pounded away. Worked like a charm

    Charley

  5. #15
    Chris Nielsen's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone, I will see how I get on with your suggestions...

  6. #16
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    Chris I used a piece of hardwood cut with an arc to match the lens diameter and a piece of dowel hit lightly with hammer. The dowel protects the thread, you shape the end of the dowel like a carpenters pencil but flat.

    See: http://www.kyphoto.com/classics/filterringtool.html

  7. #17
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    If you don't feel reasonably confident, consider that many camera repair people will do it for a nominal charge. A guy who I had do some work for me would charge 10 bucks and do it while-U-wait. He said he liked doing that with quick stuff instead of writing up a work order and putting it in the queue.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

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