Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,228   Posts: 1,532,751   Online: 892
      
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242

    Minolta to Canon Mount

    I have multiple Minolta lenses (28mm, 50mm, 200mm, 400mm, 500mm) that I use with my 35mm Minolta camera. Most of these are a MC or MD mount. However, the 500mm mirror lens is labeled as a "RF" Rokkor - don't know if that has anything to do with my question. I want to be able to use these lenses with my Canon EOS 40D since all of them are in pretty good shape. Was simply wondering if this mount adapter would do the trick. Got decent reviews. To be able to use all these lenses on my digital camera for $40 would be amazing.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1
    Hi aaronmichael.

    I run a variety of adapters on my 40D but haven't bothered with Minolta due to the lens register distance being too close. This mean that unless you are using an adapter with a lens to allow infinity focus which will also degrade the minolta lens' optical performance you will only be able to use them for macro work. Also, that same adapter with lens will act like a short tele extender (1.4x if I recall) so all your minolta lenses will be an even longer equivalent focal length.

    Hope that is helpful.
    Darren

  3. #3
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren View Post
    Hi aaronmichael.

    I run a variety of adapters on my 40D but haven't bothered with Minolta due to the lens register distance being too close. This mean that unless you are using an adapter with a lens to allow infinity focus which will also degrade the minolta lens' optical performance you will only be able to use them for macro work. Also, that same adapter with lens will act like a short tele extender (1.4x if I recall) so all your minolta lenses will be an even longer equivalent focal length.

    Hope that is helpful.
    Darren
    Thanks for the reply Darren. I might end up purchasing it anyway. Even if I only use it for certain applications, this would be like getting 5 new lenses for my digital camera for only $40. I could always return it if I'm not satisfied. Thanks again.

  4. #4
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Latte Land, Washington
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    832
    Good morning, Aaron;

    In your message, I do not see any reference to which Minolta Lens to Canon Body adapter you are discussing.

    For the Canon EOS-40D, may I suggest the one made by Mauro Placido at digitalrokkor.altervista.org

    The real advantage to Mauro's lens mounting flange is that it is not permanent. You can take it back off the Canon EOS-40D and restore the body to original specification.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  5. #5
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    Whoops! Totally forgot to post the link. Here is what I was referring to.

    http://www.amazon.com/Fotodiox-Lens-...9567223&sr=8-1

  6. #6
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren View Post
    Hi aaronmichael.

    I run a variety of adapters on my 40D but haven't bothered with Minolta due to the lens register distance being too close. This mean that unless you are using an adapter with a lens to allow infinity focus which will also degrade the minolta lens' optical performance you will only be able to use them for macro work. Also, that same adapter with lens will act like a short tele extender (1.4x if I recall) so all your minolta lenses will be an even longer equivalent focal length.

    Hope that is helpful.
    Darren
    Same situation as Canon FD glass.

    But that is good for Canon FD and Minolta folks buying glass. It keeps the prices low on some of the best glass ever made, which I would use primarily on film cameras anyhow. Same with pre AI Nikkor glass (though it can be mounted on low-end Nikon digital cameras – e.g. D40 – and used with manual aperture and no in-camera meter). It's some more of my favorite glass, and it is really dirt cheap. Even more so than Canon FD in may cases.

    Unfortunately, it isn't so good for folks who already have the glass, like you.

    Maybe you could use the glass on an Olympus digital body...or become a dedicated macro shooter.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #7
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Latte Land, Washington
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    832
    Good morning, Aaron;

    Looking at the fotodiox webpage, go down to the "Technical Details" section and note "Removable glass element for macro photography." If you look at the photograph of their adapter, you will see that it is at least 6mm thick. The lens registration distance for the Canon EF lens is just 0.5mm or about 0.020 inch longer than the Minolta SR lens mount registration distance. It is that silly 1/2 millimeter that allows Mauro Placido to make his replacement Canon EOS EF lens flange for the Minolta SR lens mount without any "optical correction glass lens." This gives you the normal Minolta lens quality without any optical modification of the light path.

    The result? The fotodiox, and all other similar "Minolta MD to Canon EOS" lens adapters with a glass optical correction element to achieve focus at infinity, will not provide the image quality that the Digital ROKKOR Replacement Lens Flange will deliver from your Minolta lenses.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  8. #8
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Javins View Post
    Good morning, Aaron;

    Looking at the fotodiox webpage, go down to the "Technical Details" section and note "Removable glass element for macro photography." If you look at the photograph of their adapter, you will see that it is at least 6mm thick. The lens registration distance for the Canon EF lens is just 0.5mm or about 0.020 inch longer than the Minolta SR lens mount registration distance. It is that silly 1/2 millimeter that allows Mauro Placido to make his replacement Canon EOS EF lens flange for the Minolta SR lens mount without any "optical correction glass lens." This gives you the normal Minolta lens quality without any optical modification of the light path.

    The result? The fotodiox, and all other similar "Minolta MD to Canon EOS" lens adapters with a glass optical correction element to achieve focus at infinity, will not provide the image quality that the Digital ROKKOR Replacement Lens Flange will deliver from your Minolta lenses.
    Thanks again. What about the quality at other distances besides infinity? Would they suffer from a decrease in quality as well. I think I could live without being able to focus at infinity.

  9. #9
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Latte Land, Washington
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    832
    Quote Originally Posted by aaronmichael View Post
    Thanks again. What about the quality at other distances besides infinity? Would they suffer from a decrease in quality as well. I think I could live without being able to focus at infinity.
    Good morning, Aaron;

    OK. The use of the simple type adapter such as the Fotodiox will affect the image quality at all distances when used between your Minolta lenses and the Canon EOS-40D body. There will be an additional piece of glass of unknown quality between the lens and the body to correct for losing the ability to focus at infinity due to the thickness of the adapter, and the addition of any glass, especially behind the lens, will have some negative effect on the image quality, just from the fact that it is more glass, even if it is just a plain piece of glass with parallel plano surfaces on both sides of the glass.

    One example of this kind of an effect can be found with telephoto lenses where there is provision for using smaller filters in a special holder usually at the back of the telephoto lens. This is to get around the cost of filters in sizes of 77mm, 82mm, 86mm, 95mm, 105mm, 112mm, 122mm, and others for truly impressive lenses. 122mm filters are usually well over $100.00 each. The price for a 30.5mm, 39mm, or 43mm filter for example, is much less, so that is why they chose to do that. But the design of the telephoto lens is a little more critical at that point in the back of the optical path. All of the light rays are bunched together in a much smaller area than at the front of the lens where the light enters the lens. Any glass at this point must be of a good quality with no distortion, or there are effects on the image at the focal plane. The curious thing is that the designer must account for the effect of just the glass in that filter at that point in the lens, and as a result, there must be at least a plain or "normal filter" installed when the lens is used without any of the other colored filters in place. If not, the lens resolution and other qualities are degraded.

    An example of this effect is the original Tamron Type 107B SP 300mm f/2.8 LD IF telephoto lens where they forgot to include the rear mounted filter in the optical design, and added the mechanical mount afterward. A true embarrassment. The production samples did not perform well, and in the MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY tests, they found that the lens did much better when they took the "normal filter" out of the lens. The next lens in that series, the Tamron Type 60B, did have the filter included in the optical design, and it performed much better with the filter in place, and the performance dropped when the filter was removed, as would be expected.

    OK. So what happens if we follow the suggestion of the Fotodiox people and remove the glass element "for macro-photography?" Right off, we lose the ability to focus at infinity, and also at most of the normal distances we use when taking a photograph. Essentially, we are now using the adapter as a short extension tube for close-up only photography. This means at distances measured in inches, not in feet, with a normal lens.

    Well, what does this all settle down to? The Fotodiox adapter will work with your Canon EOS-40D and your Minolta lenses, but you will not get the results you may remember from your Minolta lenses when using them to take photographs on film with a Minolta manual focus camera body. If you are making only small snapshot size prints from the photographs taken with the Minolta-Fotodiox-Canon combination, it probably will not be a problem. If you are planning on 8 by 10, 11 by 14, 16 by 20, and larger, you will see a difference.

    Aaron, you are lucky. You have a Canon EOS DSLR camera with an APS-C size digital sensor. The Digital ROKKOR Replacement Lens Mounting Flange will go right onto your camera, and it can be removed and the original Canon EF-S lens mounting flange put back onto the camera without any permanent change. The price of the Digital ROKKOR Lens Mounting Flange is about the same as the Fotodiox adapter, but there is the cost of the shipping from Italy. When I last checked, I think it was about $24.00 for air, but not express. I think it is worth the cost of the shipping to get the better quality and functionality of your Minolta lenses with your Canon EOS-40D DSLR camera.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  10. #10
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Javins View Post
    Good morning, Aaron;

    OK. The use of the simple type adapter such as the Fotodiox will affect the image quality at all distances when used between your Minolta lenses and the Canon EOS-40D body. There will be an additional piece of glass of unknown quality between the lens and the body to correct for losing the ability to focus at infinity due to the thickness of the adapter, and the addition of any glass, especially behind the lens, will have some negative effect on the image quality, just from the fact that it is more glass, even if it is just a plain piece of glass with parallel plano surfaces on both sides of the glass.

    One example of this kind of an effect can be found with telephoto lenses where there is provision for using smaller filters in a special holder usually at the back of the telephoto lens. This is to get around the cost of filters in sizes of 77mm, 82mm, 86mm, 95mm, 105mm, 112mm, 122mm, and others for truly impressive lenses. 122mm filters are usually well over $100.00 each. The price for a 30.5mm, 39mm, or 43mm filter for example, is much less, so that is why they chose to do that. But the design of the telephoto lens is a little more critical at that point in the back of the optical path. All of the light rays are bunched together in a much smaller area than at the front of the lens where the light enters the lens. Any glass at this point must be of a good quality with no distortion, or there are effects on the image at the focal plane. The curious thing is that the designer must account for the effect of just the glass in that filter at that point in the lens, and as a result, there must be at least a plain or "normal filter" installed when the lens is used without any of the other colored filters in place. If not, the lens resolution and other qualities are degraded.

    An example of this effect is the original Tamron Type 107B SP 300mm f/2.8 LD IF telephoto lens where they forgot to include the rear mounted filter in the optical design, and added the mechanical mount afterward. A true embarrassment. The production samples did not perform well, and in the MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY tests, they found that the lens did much better when they took the "normal filter" out of the lens. The next lens in that series, the Tamron Type 60B, did have the filter included in the optical design, and it performed much better with the filter in place, and the performance dropped when the filter was removed, as would be expected.

    OK. So what happens if we follow the suggestion of the Fotodiox people and remove the glass element "for macro-photography?" Right off, we lose the ability to focus at infinity, and also at most of the normal distances we use when taking a photograph. Essentially, we are now using the adapter as a short extension tube for close-up only photography. This means at distances measured in inches, not in feet, with a normal lens.

    Well, what does this all settle down to? The Fotodiox adapter will work with your Canon EOS-40D and your Minolta lenses, but you will not get the results you may remember from your Minolta lenses when using them to take photographs on film with a Minolta manual focus camera body. If you are making only small snapshot size prints from the photographs taken with the Minolta-Fotodiox-Canon combination, it probably will not be a problem. If you are planning on 8 by 10, 11 by 14, 16 by 20, and larger, you will see a difference.

    Aaron, you are lucky. You have a Canon EOS DSLR camera with an APS-C size digital sensor. The Digital ROKKOR Replacement Lens Mounting Flange will go right onto your camera, and it can be removed and the original Canon EF-S lens mounting flange put back onto the camera without any permanent change. The price of the Digital ROKKOR Lens Mounting Flange is about the same as the Fotodiox adapter, but there is the cost of the shipping from Italy. When I last checked, I think it was about $24.00 for air, but not express. I think it is worth the cost of the shipping to get the better quality and functionality of your Minolta lenses with your Canon EOS-40D DSLR camera.
    Thanks for the in depth answer. I'll definitely look into the mount that you're talking about.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin