Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,940   Posts: 1,557,446   Online: 834
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Århus, Denmark
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,102
    Images
    16

    The first camera...

    Hi

    I was thinking about what camera to start out with when you are a beginner. I have some neighbour and friends looking for a camera that will be good for starting up. I would like to have you guys and girls in here comment on my recommendations.

    I really recommend starting out using a manual camera with manual focus. Then you can learn the basics of shutter speed, aperture, focusing and DOF. If you start out with a fully automatic camera like my Canon EOS 30 (ELAN 7E) with AF (that can follow your eye and focus at what you look at), programs and all the other stuff that helps you in your daily photography and I'm very happy to have (especially aperture priority and AF).
    But as a beginner you won't learn the basics which is essential. Of course the beginner could set the camera to manual and disable the autofocus...but we all know that it won't happen...or at least, it takes a lot of strength not to switch the electronics on and shoot away...

    What do you think?

  2. #2
    titrisol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Rotterdam
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,671
    Images
    8
    A Pentax K-1000 is an excellent starter camera.
    Rugged, well built, excellent optics and very basic.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  3. #3
    sparx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Norfolk UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    376
    I would have to recommend an Olympus OM series camera. Total control, legendary optics and so many accessories still available second hand it will take someone through the beginner stage and out the other side.
    [size=1]the all new darkplanet photoblog[/size][size=1]
    [/size]

  4. #4
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    A manual Nikon (ai or ais). If they love the camera they have 40 years worth of lenses to choose from. They are built like rocks (My wife has the FE2), but when everything is said and done all manuals are pretty good and its the lenses that tell the tale.

    *

  5. #5
    Max
    Max is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    97
    My first "real" camera was a Nikon FM - built like a tank, doesn't need batteries (the lightmeter is the only thing that uses them - if they die, you can keep shooting using other ways to figure the exposure), and like Mr. Callow said, a lot of great lenses to choose from.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,654
    Images
    5
    Good Morning,

    I'd second the Olympus recommendation, assuming that one is interested in 35mm.

    Konical

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,360
    Images
    20
    Even as a Canon FD user, I'd recommend a Nikon manual focus camera for someone getting into 35mm photography today, since it will allow easy transitions "forward" or "backward," and it's all good quality stuff.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #8
    noseoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Tucson
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,898
    Images
    17
    A real sleeper on ebay is the Fuji STX-1, STX-2, STX-1N series. These were very good cameras, with DOF preview, self timer, manual with light meter, very basic. Glass was excellent (Fujinon X-mount, EBC) in primes and zooms. They were from the early 80's and are going cheap, bodies and lenses! I just picked one up on ebay with case, 3 lenses, filters, etc. for $75.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    701
    Quote Originally Posted by modafoto
    But as a beginner you won't learn the basics which is essential. Of course the beginner could set the camera to manual and disable the autofocus...but we all know that it won't happen...or at least, it takes a lot of strength not to switch the electronics on and shoot away...
    I can't comment on what the best system is for a beginner, but I did want to comment on the portion quoted. I realize I might be different from the norm but I never use any of the auto features on my camera. I hadn't even had my first roll of film developed when I switched over to full manual on my Minolta Maxxum 50QD. I've never considered going back - not even to use aperture or shutter priority. It's an auto-focus camera but I still manually focus all my shots. I have two zoom lenses but restrict myself to using a small list of specific focal lengths. I do not randomly change the focal length per shot but rather choose a focal length to work with as I view something I would like to photograph, I then set my lens to that setting and do my best to make it work. I actually get rather frustrated when I unthinkingly adjust the focal length rather than the focus - because then I have to stop and make sure to reset it to the chosen focal length before I am willing to proceed. I set of prime lenses would fix that little annoyance.

    I think how the camera is used depends very much on the person using it and what they specifically want to get out of photography. If the person has a desire and is committed to learning, all the features in the world are not going to get in their way.

  10. #10
    127
    127 is offline
    127's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    uk
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    581
    I'd aggree that any kind of automation is VERY difficult to turn off. Most of the cameras I use are totally manual. I set the exposure based on experience, and stuff almost always comes out fine.

    When I use my Petri 35mm (very rarely) with a build in meter I find it almost impossible not to become totally dependant on the meter. I stop trusting my judegement, and start trusting the little needle in the viewfinder. The means I stop looking at the light, and thinking about the scene.

    When I occasionally use a Canon EOS (not mine), I just put it on program and let it drive. If I try and control anything manually then it just compensates elsewhere automatically and I'm never sure what it's changed. The shots come out fine, but I want to get back to my nice manual cameras.

    The idea that the Auto-SLR can operate in point and shoot, so the novice can get good pictures immediatly, then gradually turn off the automation step by step as they get more experienced is a nice one, but it takes a lot of courage.

    Ian

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin