Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,283   Posts: 1,534,989   Online: 1009
      
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 60
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    St. Joseph, LA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    33
    I second the recommendation to read Fred Picker's "Zone VI Workshop."
    I also recommend Carson Graves' "The Zone System for 35mm Photographers." (Be careful - the edition I have has a misprint where it's listing f/stop - shutter speed combinations. I can't remember where the error is, though)

    As for exposing for Zone III shadows, not all shadows are that dark. And also, you can expose for half or 1/3 zones too - Zone IV-1/2 for example.
    Last edited by Kisatchie; 05-08-2011 at 01:21 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,271
    Images
    60
    This is probably now apparent to the OP, but just in case it isn't ....

    To me, the Zone System is a method used to determine the development of your film.

    If you are not shooting individual sheets, or multiple film backs (N, N +1, N -1, etc.), or different bodies for different lighting contrasts than it really isn't the Zone system you are using.

    I think the OP is really just trying to figure out how to best use a spot meter with roll film.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,325
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    This is probably now apparent to the OP, but just in case it isn't ....

    To me, the Zone System is a method used to determine the development of your film.

    If you are not shooting individual sheets, or multiple film backs (N, N +1, N -1, etc.), or different bodies for different lighting contrasts than it really isn't the Zone system you are using.

    I think the OP is really just trying to figure out how to best use a spot meter with roll film.
    That is right, even if I cannnot use ZS for landscapes with roll-film I think it is still possible to use for portraits.

    Since, I do not know whether it is good idea to put all my portraits in 18% gray ;-)

    Nevertheless, a beginner like me will be fascinated by ZS.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  4. #14
    ghostcount's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Near The Platinum Triangle, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    252
    Images
    11
    Thank you Ralph. I also want to thank you for posting your ZS dial, it proved to be really helpful this past weekend.
    “I drank what?” - Socrates

  5. #15
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,457
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by mikebarger View Post
    ... Could you explain what steps up took in your example to make the very nice print. ...
    Waiting for a cloud requires clouds to be there. Using a dodging card only works with long exposure times. However, film has great latitude for overexposure, and that's why burning-in windows works well. It does require making a custom masks, but that's no problem. Attached is a sample mask from another picture.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails PrintMask.jpg  
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #16
    puptent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Walnut Grove, MN USA (Laura Ingall Wilder's home)
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    62
    Images
    80
    I'm a 35mm shooter, I've got Carson Graves book, and others. It is true that ZS works very well with sheet film and LF cameras. But the principles of ZS help the 35mm photographer visualize his final print. Should I happen to get ONE very good or important exposure on a roll, I will develop for that exposure. In 35mm the ZS maybe isn't so much about DESIGNING the exposure as it is PREDICTING the negative. In a LF picture you can do figuring and calculations for a long time, you can sketch, plan, and then execute. Typically the 35mm shooter is going much faster between exposures, and his or her visualization of the finished print is kind of like a Reader's Digest version. That's why we bracket. But another product of learning ZS is that it increases your appreciation for THE PRINT, yours and other people's.
    "We often think that when we have completed our study of one we know all about two, because 'two' is 'one and one'. We forget that we have still to make a study of 'and'."
    -A. S. Eddington

  7. #17
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,457
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    That is right, even if I cannnot use ZS for landscapes with roll-film ...
    Why not? Multiple 35mm bodies are cheap these days!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 35mmZoneSystem.jpg  
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #18
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,325
    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Why not? Multiple 35mm bodies are cheap these days!
    :-) or may be [N-2, N-1, N, N+1, N+2] bracketing.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  9. #19
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,457
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    :-) or may be [N-2, N-1, N, N+1, N+2] bracketing.
    How do you bracket development? That's even harder in 35mm.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #20
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,325
    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    How do you bracket development? That's even harder in 35mm.
    I think, I should come from digital mind set... ;-)

    Now, the hunt is for a camera which takes sheet film and compact as 35mm SLR.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin