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  1. #11
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    SHUTTER RELEASE:

    The button is located in a good place and has a soft touch. You need to depress it slightly to make the camera focus, then you are ready to depress it all the way to make the image on film. If you try to take a picture before focusing it acts like a very quick self timer, and dissipates any concept of 'decisive moment.'

    AUTOFOCUS:

    There is a marker in the center of the frame which you place over the textured object on which to focus. When you depress the shutter button slightly, focus is achieved and a confirmatory, pleasant, sound is emitted. It is very straight forward, but if you are in a hurry, you need to turn the autofocus off. This is easily done with a lever on the camera body. Then you can twist the front of the lens and focus in the usual manner (though it is less than a quarter of a turn to go from macro to infinity).

    The camera back has a lever to tell it which autofocus sensor to use. The choices are to use the center area, or a peripheral area or a camera-defined area.
    The center area works best for me. If you have strabismus or some other ailment, maybe you want to define a focus area on the right or left of center for some reason. If you use the 'camera-defined' focus area, the camera chooses one of the 5 focus areas on its own. This essentially makes it impossible to focus. The camera shows the sensing area to you by outlining it in black, but as soon as you move it over your subject to focus, it switches to a different area. This thoroughly confounds ones ability to have the subject in focus, so I avoid that one (it is marked in green as a warning).
    Last edited by ic-racer; 05-11-2011 at 12:05 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fstop View Post
    Not really a quirk, its smart engineering, if you screw up and open the back of the camera part way through a roll of film you won't ruin the shots you exposed.
    Yes, I kind of like it. I just have to remember to fire off the blank shots at the beginning to get the frame counter to 36 before starting. That way you always know to stop at 0. In case it starts off at something like 37 or 38 etc. In a week or month or even a day, it will be impossible for me to remember if I was supposed to stop shooting on 1, 2, or 3 etc.

  3. #13
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I have processed the first few rolls and examined the negatives. So far the images look very promising. The lens, at the 28mm setting, seems to have very good sharpness and seems to be very even throughout the field. Distinctly different from the Distagon 28mm that is sharpest at the center and is worse near the edges. I have searched but there is no MTF pdf file on the internet available for the Nikkor 28-80 to confirm my impression http://www.photodo.com/lens/Nikon-AF-2880mm-f3356-1010 .

  4. #14

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    I got mine from KEH about a year ago to compare to an F4S, just for kicks. I laugh everytime I use it. So much better than a P & S as noted before. For kicks, I even put some of my new DX G lenses on it....works perfect. With an SB-23 it is so easy for wife to even use and with my SB-28 I can do pretty much anything. D style AF lenses work good......I rarely put a MF lense on it because I normally am chasing young children around and just can't MF anymore the way I used to.

    Doing a kiddie gymnastics olympics last week and in a hurry opened the F4S up with the film still in (fortunatley only lost 3 shots), that's why I don't mind the N75 running the film out first.

    Another reason I got an N75 was to try out all the new electronics that the F100, F5 and F6 have on them that are similar (minus all the nice goodies of those cameras) before I decide on which one to buy. I really want an F100.

  5. #15
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Hot off the press. (Literally, it is still warm from the Seal Press... )
    One of the first images from the N75. This is on Trix and printed on Ilford Fiberbased Multigrade. Image size is about 4x6" on an 8x10 sheet.

  6. #16
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Hot off the press. (Literally, it is still warm from the Seal Press... )
    One of the first images from the N75. This is on Trix and printed on Ilford Fiberbased Multigrade. Image size is about 4x6" on an 8x10 sheet.
    Does this camera have spot metering?
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  7. #17
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    Does this camera have spot metering?
    No, it does not. But with my 28mm to 300mm zoom, I can get a spot meter reading.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #18
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    No, it does not. But with my 28mm to 300mm zoom, I can get a spot meter reading.

    Steve
    I am looking for an consumer level SLR with a spot meter from Nikon.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  9. #19
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    I am looking for an consumer level SLR with a spot meter from Nikon.
    Better than consumer level quality, but at today's prices, take a look at the Nikon F100. It can be used as a point and shoot or any level up to and including professional or serious enthusiast.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #20

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    Those of us who happen to share initials with that KR resent the implications of that comment

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