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  1. #1
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Nikon N75 Review

    In case anyone is interested in a review of the Nikon N75 by someone who's 35mm experience is centered around manual focus German cameras. (Rather than a review by someone with initials KR who makes a living from digital photography )

    This is what the N75 and its 'kit' lens will be up against:



  2. #2
    kwall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    In case anyone is interested in a review of the Nikon N75 by someone who's 35mm experience is centered around manual focus German cameras. (Rather than a review by someone with initials KR who makes a living from digital photography )

    This is what the N75 and its 'kit' lens will be up against:
    Sure, I'd be up for a review of the N75. I don't give a flip what Ken Rockwell says.

    Those Rolleiflex 3003s are pretty sexy looking, too.

  3. #3
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Why the N75? Because that is the last film camera (not counting the F6 which will not be discussed here) that Nikon made. The N75 was designed around 2003 and discontinued in 2006, from what I have read.

    What is my background with this type of camera...NONE! That is right I have never owned a Nikon or an autofocus camera or a zoom lens (I must live in a cave, hu?)

    For whatever reason, in the USA the camera came in silver. I think that is a good thing as it is less likely to be confused with a digital or more expensive camera (who wants their car window smashed for a $35 camera?)

    $35?? Is that right? Well, the bodies alone seem to average around that amount on completed e-bay auctions in mid 2011 (US Dollars).

    I overpaid a little on a BIN from a dealer, but I didn't have time to wait around on an auction. I spent $80 and got a 'mint-minus' body, lens and the MB-18 battery holder on the bottom. What I did NOT get (and these add up) is the original strap, original caps, eyepiece rubber piece, box and owner's manual. So, when looking at prices on e-bay, realize, for example, that the original Nikon lenscap cost over ten dollars at B&H. That is about one-third the price of the camera body!

    Here is a stock image of a Nikon N75:
    Last edited by ic-racer; 05-10-2011 at 07:54 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    This camera does have a few quirks, but in the long run they are not much of a bother:
    Lens turns wrong way to come off
    Camera is difficult to hold still with thumb on the exposure lock and finger on the release button holding the focus lock at the same time
    Focus ring turns too easily
    Unwinds the entire roll from the start, then spools it back onto the cassette as you go
    Viewfinder is very small (though probably normal for this type of compact/small pentaprism camera)
    Flash is dim, acts more like a fill-in flash (compared to the massive Rollei E36 )

  5. #5
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    More to come...stay tuned...

  6. #6
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    I have an N-75 that I bought when I won a Tamron AF 28mm to 300mm zoom. I now use it only for C-41 film. I later got a F-100 that is used for black & white film. The N-75 does have a very few minor quirks but the matrix metering and the rest of the camera's performance is well above what one would expect for the cost. Yes, it cannot compete with the F-100 for features and ability to control the photograph, but the pair is good for for traveling when I want a record of the trip and taking relatively few "serious" photographs. They were used as my main cameras for years. Coming to APUG gradually changed that.

    I use the Hasselblads for serious work and the 4"x5" just for fun and playing with swing, tilts and rises.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #7
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Matrix metering.
    I'm OK with it. If you read Nikon's documentation of Aug 2001 and see the examples, in almost every example the Matrix metering scheme gives more exposure. It functions as if they put some of the film exposure safety factor into the metering system. So, yes, you can get good exposures rating the film near box speed, however, your shutter speed and aperture will not be much different than using 1/2 ISO on an older average meter camera.

  8. #8
    fstop's Avatar
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    Unwinds the entire roll from the start, then spools it back onto the cassette as you go
    Not really a quirk, its smart engineering, if you screw up and open the back of the camera part way through a roll of film you won't ruin the shots you exposed.

  9. #9
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    I bought a N75 new for about $150 back in the days. It was my first AF film camera. It is very lightweight and fits in the hand easily. Note that the grip fits small hands very well, with the N80 having a slightly larger more rounded grip and the F100 much larger. The N80 feels a bit more solid but i've dropped the N75 a few times ond it still works perfectly.

    It is very similar to the N80 in specs and performance. The 28-80 G lens that came standard is quite a good lens. A 50mm f1.8 is a good match.

    In conclusion I'd like to say the N75 is a very likeable camera and I would recommend throwing it in a bag or luggage over a P+S. The AF is not quite fast as I would like it for moving subjects but fine for quick snaps.
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

  10. #10
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    FILM SPEED:

    The camera only shoots at ISO 100, so you have to use the exposure compensation dial (+/- 3 stops). It is only in half-stop increments, but I'm not the first to point out that the difference between the half-stop point and the third-stop points is not enough to make any difference with B&W negative film. That will get you from 800 to 12 which is pretty good. The flaw here is that the exposure compensation does not work in MANUAL or AUTO (but does work in all the other modes).
    Good news is that because of the Matrix metering the camera may actually give enough exposure with the DX coded ISO speed to use that as your EI (with name-brand fresh film). I have not tried this, however.

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