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  1. #1

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    Canon's 35mm SLR

    I know for Nikon it was the F series... I owned an F5 for a while and LOVED it, but I've recently switched to Canon for my digital gear and I'm a little fuzzy on their model numbers... my wife has a Canon EOS 30 that was leftover from a photo 1 class... I shot a roll or so through it today and it feels alright but I'm curious what was Canon's real 35mm workhorse? Are they affordable now? What would you recommend if I was wanting a real "pro's" 35mm body. Let me know!

    -a

  2. #2

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    Well, you can't go wrong starting with the new F-1.



    You can read more about it at -> MIR Canon new F-1

    For my use with ultra macros with bellows, the split image rangefinder that doesn't black out is a definite plus. Other handy features are aperture priority auto exposure and most shutter speeds available when battery is exhausted.

  3. #3
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Canon's real and enduring "modern" workhorses are the EOS 1N, 1N HS, (both discontinued in 1999) 1V (current-) and any other incarnations lurking out there. Second hand robust pro-level bodies can be had for around $300 to $600, depending on whether the power drive booster is included and, especially, condition: many have been well-used and shot many thousands of rolls (this is factor in shutter life and accuracy over the long-term). Whether you go for the old FD series or the EOS EF system is a matter of nostalgia vs technology: both systems have their devout followers and detractors.


  4. #4
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    If you wanted to use your EF lenses, then the EOS1 is the camera that you need. This is similar in operation to the Nikon F5, and shouldn't cost too much in this day and age. Like the F Nikons though, you have to be careful not to get a pro "beater".
    I personally use the F1, and T90, but both use the FD series lenses, so you can't use the newer EF lenses on them.

  5. #5

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  6. #6

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    Yep, although, I'd get at least a 1N, the 1 was the first Pro EOS camera, they learned a lot and put it into the 1N. Honestly, my fav EOS was always the EOS A2/A2e/EOS 5 series, but those do have an issue with the control dial that could leave you with problems(although, mine, purchased in 1995, is still running just fine, thankyouverymuch).

  7. #7
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbla View Post

    That's cheap and cheerful, especially the Ex+ list! I would not still be at the desk pondering it. I would have pounced on it.


  8. #8
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlandrigan View Post
    Yep, although, I'd get at least a 1N, the 1 was the first Pro EOS camera, they learned a lot and put it into the 1N. Honestly, my fav EOS was always the EOS A2/A2e/EOS 5 series, but those do have an issue with the control dial that could leave you with problems(although, mine, purchased in 1995, is still running just fine, thankyouverymuch).

    I can tell you all about that control dial — a major annoyance that has been reported many times around the world. Mine was replaced twice. It still holds, but a major weakness is also in the plastic back cover latch and lens-release button (both are metal in the EOS 1- pro-level bodies). I bought my EOS 5 in August 1994. A fading internal/external display in humid/cold conditions (display driver bridge circuit fault) is the only other (uncurable) condition but otherwise, I turn the EOS 5 on and it is ever ready for a rave with its bigger brother.


  9. #9

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    EOS 1, 1N, 1V, and variations are the pro bodies. EOS 3 is up there in ability with the 1V, with the two of them sharing the same AF system; the 3 is just not as solidly built.

    I'd go for the 3 or 1V. The 3 can be had for about $200; it's the best bang for the buck in an EOS film camera, I think. And I prefer it because it has eye-controlled focus point selection, which is genius feature that really should be brought back on all AF cameras IMO.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  10. #10
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    In order, my favs that I currently own are EOS 3, EOS A2e, F-1 (old, 3200 ASA), A-1. All are great cameras, though. I, too, love the eye-control. It's very good on the 3 and pretty good on the A2e.

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