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  1. #21
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Hi,

    In-camera meters aren't very helpful in low levels of available light anyhow. I wouldn't worry about changing if that is your only gripe about your camera. IME (which is quite a lot in very low light), one is better off with an educated guess in those conditions. If you were shooting transparency film, I'd use a spot meter, though, or an old Canon FTb with a meter booster and a long lens. That is how I always used to use Ektachrome 320T. I'd meter using an FTb with a 200mm lens, and place highlights or midtones, usually with the film pushed one or two stops. Then I would shoot with another camera with a shorter lens. With a 200 lens and the 12 percent meter, it was a pretty decent spot meter, minus the hassle of its size.

    However, if you are really interested in using an in-camera meter for very low light, not much is better than the FT or FTb with the meter booster (or an F-1 with Booster Finder T). http://reocities.com/Nashville/Stage...ter_index.html. They can get readings of EV -3.5. I have also heard that the Pellix equipped with one of these can get readings of EV -4.5, but I have not used this combination myself. I'm not sure how low the F-1 with a Booster Finder T can meter.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #22

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    As you probably know, the circuitry on many OM 4's was updated. I think the way to check for new circuitry is to do a battery check. If it turns off after 30 seconds, it's the new circuit. Even with new circuitry, there is still a drain so it would be best to remove the batteries if you are not using the camera. Could I put a word in for the OM2000? 1/125 flash synchronisation speed, 3200 ASA setting, 1/2000 max shutter speed, spot metering. Totally manual (except for the meter) so battery life is extremely long. Also, when using the self timer, the mirror and aperture pre-fire, so if you are using a tripod, vibration is kept to an absolute minimum. This can be essential if yoiu want to get the best from your lenses (it shares this feature with the OM 4 and OM 4Ti). There were lots of variants of the this camera made for many marques over the years (it's made by Cosina). The only one still in production is the Nikon FM 10, I think.

  3. #23

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    As far as I have researched - and please correct or add to my info, there are no other cameras that have the unassisted sensitivity range of the OM2S/4T (down to EV -5) and the Pentax LX (down to EV -6.5). I give the advantage to the OM2S/4T as it does have spot metering as well as an illuminated display required at these low levels of light.

  4. #24
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    That is pretty amazing. I had no idea.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #25

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    BTW, Canon's aperture priority auto exposure mode is cutoff to a maximum of 30 seconds while the OM's, LX - as well as most of the Nikons, will leave the shutter open for just about as long as it requires to make that "correct" exposure. The OM's and LX however will continue to meter the scene and adjust exposure time appropriately - up or down, while the Nikons remember the exposure at the time the shutter is tripped and will not adjust. The Minoltas seem to vary from one model to the next but I haven't seen one go past 30 seconds. This list includes today's latest and greatest - including the none film variety . . . ;-)

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Les Sarile View Post
    You're buying used so make sure you have warranty or money back - buy from a reputable seller.

    Depending on where you are, quality lenses for either are at a premium but Nikons are generally less costly then Olympus because there seems to be more available. The F3 can use none AI lenses which are also generally less expensive then the AI or newer lenses. There are an abundance of screens and finders for the F3 so there is bound to be one you prefer. Also, the F3 viewfinder is 100%.

    On the OM4, you have the most sophisticated metering of any camera. While it's exposure range is just less then the Pentax LX, it adds spot metering that the was not common. The OM4 - actually all OM's, are smaller and lighter then the F3 and so are the equivalent lenses. The OM's maybe the gem of cameras but they are robust.

    Not to add to the decision dilemma, but in this level of cameras, the Pentax LX is a worthwhile consideration if not the leader of it's class. Almost the size and weight of the OM's, sophisticated flash and TTL metering as the OM4, interchangeable finders/screens like the F3 and the hybrid mechanical/electronic shutter giving you much more shutter speeds available when the battery dies like the Canon new F-1.
    I have a Pentax LX. It's a great camera, BUT there are a couple of things to be aware of.

    The automatic mode has no exposure memory lock. I'd become so used to this in other automatic cameras I took it for granted. Frame to meter the desired areas, lock exposure, re-compose. On the LX that requires using manual mode or adjusting the compensation for the equivalent exposure, which is not that easy, basically impossible with the camera to your eye. I think this is the one thing lacking in this otherwise excellent camera.

    Another thing is that it is rather loud. I can't really quantify this, and it isn't thunderous or anything, but my little Ricoh XR-7 second body is much, much quieter (and has the exposure memory lock - in some ways it's actually nicer to use but built like a toy compared to the tank-like pro grade LX.)

    Another thing that some people don't like is that the way the mirror lock up and self timer are controlled, there's no way to use both. You can't lock the mirror up and then have the self timer fire the camera. If I used the self timer that might be a limitation, but I don't so it's a non-issue for me.

    The LX does have an excellent meter with off the film metering including OTF flash metering with the proper dedicated flash units, superb low light response, interchangeable finders etc. plus all shutter speeds from X (1/75) to 1/2000 are usable without batteries. It's a great camera, but (like any other camera I've ever used) not completely perfect.

  7. #27

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    Somehow I like the fact that there are no perfect cameras . . . makes for great justification to owning a few . . . ;-)

    Personally, I prefer the Nikon approach to MLU on their FM2N/FM3/FE2/FA in that they combined it with the self timer. When using the self timer, the mirror flips up first seconds before the shutter fires.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Not on the OM2n. There is no separate compensation knob, you just change turn the film speed knob to a different speed, which maxes out at 1600.
    No, there is no separate compensation knob, and it works as you say. BUT! They (OM2) give adjustment values in 1/3 stops. Without having to do the math. That's how they work. Any camera with a compensation control will adjust a contact on a resistor band thereby compensating exposure to a different EI.
    Someone will have to adjust(compensate) in processing for correct development. So What?
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selidor View Post
    ...BetterSense is right. You can set ±2 exposure compensation at all speeds bar the lowest() and highest(1600). The dial will just stop moving....
    Rats

  10. #30

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    Oldest OM-4 do have higher battery drain, but batteries will last much longer if you use silver oxide batteries (357, 303, MS76, KS76, G-13, SR44-W, S76). Alkaline (A76, LR44) and lithium (CR1/3N) have much shorter life. To test OM-4 to see if it has intermediate, lower drain circuit board, turn battery check on. If beep and LED turn off automatically in approx. 30 seconds, circuit is newer style. John

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