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  1. #21
    LudditeJay's Avatar
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    The recommendation of an EM is not bad if you want a very compact Nikon slr, but I never thought that excluding a shutter speed dial was a good idea. I think the EM was only offered in black and you expressed interest in a chrome camera. Have a look at an FG. It shares the same compact size as the EM, available in chrome, and has full manual control.

    For street-shooting I don't know if it is all that important to even bother with in-camera metering or use it as a major factor in the purchase of a camera for the purpose. I would probably just take an incident reading and use that to decide my exposure. I would take readings each time I felt that the light had changed enough to warrant it.

    I always get better and more consistent results when I use an incident light meter in comparison to in-camera meters so I would say ignore the camera's meter in your decision making.
    Jason

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuhead View Post
    why not an FM2 ?
    If I'm focusing manually, which is most of the time, the FM2 is my favorite choice.

    I actually prefer setting exposure manually too, so aperture priority isn't an option I really care about.

    In situations where fast film switching is important though, I'm back to the N90s.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by LudditeJay View Post
    For street-shooting I don't know if it is all that important to even bother with in-camera metering or use it as a major factor in the purchase of a camera for the purpose. I would probably just take an incident reading and use that to decide my exposure. I would take readings each time I felt that the light had changed enough to warrant it.

    I always get better and more consistent results when I use an incident light meter in comparison to in-camera meters so I would say ignore the camera's meter in your decision making.
    +1
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #24
    CGW
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    "For street-shooting I don't know if it is all that important to even bother with in-camera metering or use it as a major factor in the purchase of a camera for the purpose. I would probably just take an incident reading and use that to decide my exposure. I would take readings each time I felt that the light had changed enough to warrant it."


    This might work if your subjects are mailboxes or fire plugs but not people moving in and out of widely varying light. That's the advantage of late 35 AF film bodies and their sophisticated matrix meters, not to mention built-in spot/flash metering capability. Incident metering for medium format, sure, but not 35mm when dorking around with incident readings is rarely practical or even possible.

  5. #25
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    This might work if your subjects are mailboxes or fire plugs but not people moving in and out of widely varying light. That's the advantage of late 35 AF film bodies and their sophisticated matrix meters, not to mention built-in spot/flash metering capability. Incident metering for medium format, sure, but not 35mm when dorking around with incident readings is rarely practical or even possible.
    I typically meter once for the shadows and once for the bright stuff and adjust on the fly manually.

    This also gives creative control.

    It's not better or worse, just a different way of shooting.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #26
    LudditeJay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post

    This might work if your subjects are mailboxes or fire plugs but not people moving in and out of widely varying light. That's the advantage of late 35 AF film bodies and their sophisticated matrix meters, not to mention built-in spot/flash metering capability. Incident metering for medium format, sure, but not 35mm when dorking around with incident readings is rarely practical or even possible.
    Where is this "widely varying light"? Are you shooting at a circus? If you are out in the street a meter reading in the sun and one in the shade is probably all you need to give you a good idea where you need to set your exposure.

    You also greatly exaggerate the extra time that an incident reading takes. You give the impression that you think a reading needs to be taken before every shot. If you are taking a reading before every exposure then you are doing it wrong.
    Jason

  7. #27
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by LudditeJay View Post
    Where is this "widely varying light"? Are you shooting at a circus? If you are out in the street a meter reading in the sun and one in the shade is probably all you need to give you a good idea where you need to set your exposure.

    You also greatly exaggerate the extra time that an incident reading takes. You give the impression that you think a reading needs to be taken before every shot. If you are taking a reading before every exposure then you are doing it wrong.
    My subjects aren't always stationary and neither am I. Besides, why guess about exposure if the tools to nail it, in camera, are readily available with metered 35mm cameras? I'll fuss with incident readings when I'm shooting medium format but with 35mm, it's unnecessary and often a hindrance. My keeper quotient certainly doesn't suffer, either. Why guesstimate exposure with the old hi/lo approach?

  8. #28
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    While I'm waiting, can someone explain this whole "matrix metering" thing to me?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  9. #29
    LudditeJay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    My subjects aren't always stationary and neither am I. Besides, why guess about exposure if the tools to nail it, in camera, are readily available with metered 35mm cameras? I'll fuss with incident readings when I'm shooting medium format but with 35mm, it's unnecessary and often a hindrance. My keeper quotient certainly doesn't suffer, either. Why guesstimate exposure with the old hi/lo approach?
    I totally understand where you are coming from and ultimately a person will use what they prefer. I have owned an F, an FE2, an F3, and an F5. I also thought that the matrix metering on the F5 did a pretty damn good job. I no longer own any of those cameras and now use a Bessa R3m.

    You view taking an incident reading as a hindrance while I view it as freedom from guessing at what the camera will do. If I set the shutter speed and aperture myself then I have complete creative control and experience gives me a fantastic forethought as to what to expect with each frame.

    The fact that you and your subjects aren't stationary makes incident readings great. You commit to a shutter/aperture combination and you get to focus on what is important, your composition. Are you going to "nail it" every time? No, but neither is the 60/40 center-weighted meter in the FE2 and I would argue that the FE2 is going to be wrong more than the incident meter and your brain. The F3 is an 80/20 split.

    The OP was asking for opinion about the FE2 and F3 for street use. I was offering a suggestion to make the choice not worrying so much about the in-camera meter because in my opinion she/he would be better with a tiny meter like the digisix. If I had to pick one to use for street and use the in-camera metering it would be the FE2. Smaller, and the meter is easier to read quickly.

    Yeknom, check out this link to read about different metering modes.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metering_mode
    Jason

  10. #30
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    (For future reference, I'm a "he")

    I've thrown out the possibility of an F3, but have substituted it with the possibility of an FA. I would have to stick to AI-S lenses, but that matrix metering looks really nifty, and it lets me choose between shutter/aperture priority, both of which could come in handy. Not really sure why it costs less than an FE2. It doesn't feature a needle-based meter, but maybe I wouldn't mind it as much as I think.

    Anyone have any bad experiences with the FA?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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