Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,515   Posts: 1,572,074   Online: 1168
      
Page 3 of 16 FirstFirst 12345678913 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 158
  1. #21
    Aristophanes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    505
    Images
    15
    Culturally, the 1930's when art, vernacular, and journalistic 35mm photography became affordably entrenched as a medium. Thanks Leica and successors. Capa, Bresson, etc.

    Technically, the 1970's for reasons others have already spoken to.

  2. #22
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,797
    Opinions aside, some sobering data from 1998, the edge of the chasm, looking back:

    http://medfmt.8k.com/brondeath.html

  3. #23
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,956
    Images
    108
    but years even made a big difference.


    When the economy goes well , music goes well , politics goes well , art flourished. Vietnam War , Politicical unrest is the part of 70s. I think last art spark lived at these years because goverments wanted to students back to their homes. At 80s Goverments wanted to bring the women back to jobs and media started to write womens sex rights.
    Now goverments wants to third developing countries want to earn and spend and art prices of China , thousands times folded.
    I think follow the money , follow the art concept works and you have to have a broad view on earth matters to qualify the art matters.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,174
    From my small collection:
    In the 50's the most popular camera with interchangeable lenses was the rangefinder, they were slow to use.
    In the 60's SLRs with auto diaphragms and viewfinder needle metering were introduced.
    In the 70's SLRs with zooms became available, lenses had bayonet fitting.
    In the 80's AF SLRs with zooms became the camera of choice.
    In the 90's AF SLRs were perfected.
    IMO the engineering and finish of some popular 70's and 80's cameras was very nice.
    When pushed to get good pictures I use a camera from the 90's.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    northern england
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    637
    Looking at a press maul of the period, the 1960s offered the most diversity in cameras. Various SLRs, plenty of rangefinders, TLRs still mainstream, the occasional field camera like MPP and folding 120s all in the mix with flashbulbs and electronic guns.

    I still say the 30s was when quality small cameras such as Leica and Retina made inroads commercially and artistically.

  6. #26
    PDH
    PDH is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    519
    For 35mm my thinking is that the late 60s to the late 70s are the golden years, not only for pro level cameras, but also afforadable consumer level cameras including 35mm fixed lens range finders. At the pro level we had the Nikon F, F2, Canon F and new F, Minolta XK, Pentax LX, Lieca and Context systems with great lens.

  7. #27
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,350
    Quote Originally Posted by drumminor2nd View Post
    So, I was thinking about my favorite cameras, and I realized most of them came from the 1970s. The Canon F1 premiered in 1971. The Nikon F2 and Olympus OM-1 came out in 1972. Pentax ditched the M42 mount in the mid '70s. The Multimode Minolta XD-11 came out in '77.

    What do you guys think was the best (most important/biggest leap) decade for 35mm camera development?
    Yes, late 1970s was the heyday for manual, metal 35mm SLR cameras.

  8. #28
    Neanderman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ohio River Valley
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    575
    1954-1980: Introduction of the M3 til the discontinuance of the Nikon F2. I'm not anti-automation, but for me it is all about being in control.

    More than a decade, but I think this is more illustrative of a 'period' in the evolution of the all metal, 35mm camera.
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  9. #29

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Central OK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    208
    1945-1955. Somewhere in there my Canon III came into being. Everything added to 35mm cameras since that significant event is just fluff.

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    St. Joseph, LA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    33
    I vote for the 10 year span that produced the Nikon F2A and F3HP cameras.

Page 3 of 16 FirstFirst 12345678913 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin