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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrankyKraut View Post
    I loved almost everything about mine. The viewfinder was especially good, making focusing very fast and easy. Ergonomically excellent, all around. There was one thing that made me sell it, though. It was loud. In fact, so loud that discreet street photography wasn't really possible without attracting attention. If that is not an issue for you, it's one of the greatest manual focus cameras.
    I agree the T90 wouldn't be my first choice for shooting street and I tend to use other FD cameras that aren't motor driven, I find that that the T90 for a motor driven camera isn't exceptionally loud and in down town areas the ambient street noise is so loud that it's rarely a problem, and the mirror damping is so good it doesn't produce an excessive amount of vibration.
    Ben

  2. #42

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    T90 nice paperweight

    I purchased a new T90 back in September of '87. I found the sales receipt recently $587 back in '87. Adjusted for inflation, that like a million dollars in today's dollars

    The camera was a work horse. I used it mainly for shooting motorcycle races. I put 80 rolls of film thru it on one photo work week. It was an great design but if you don't use it, the shutter will go bad. I had the shutter replaced then the take up reel stopped working. Now it just goes EEEr.
    On the other hand, my fully manual old F1 is still going strong. Well the meter died years ago. I am the original owner of both cameras, so I know their history well.
    Between an older F1 and a T90, I would take the F1 hands down.

  3. #43

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    My second lens for the T90 arrived this morning, - the 35-105mm. Looks as though it has never been used. Will give a try-out this afternoon, whilst the sun is shining. Looking forward to the results. Here in the UK, last night on ebay, a T90 with 6 Canon FD lenses went for about £90.00. Some bargain for the buyer.

  4. #44

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    Canon T90

    If you are still wondering about the Canon T90... I shoot film and digital and realize there IS a difference; different tools for different jobs. I own and shoot transparencies with 6 functioning T90s. I don't change lenses to save wear and tear on the mount and lens; also, less likely to have debris entering from the front. The camera is unsurpassed in quality, ergonomics, and features. That being said, I do not use any of the metering functions and only shoot in full manual; found this more accurate after spending hundreds of hours in the studio. I religiously meter with a Minolta Flash Meter IV and a Color Meter II. You will not regret owning the best.

  5. #45
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I've owned a T90 for about 20 years and it's always worked faultlessly but I have never trusted it, if I needed to come back with pictures not excuses and if my livelihood and that of my family depended on it I would rather use my New F1's.
    Ben

  6. #46

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    I've owned my T90 from new since 1987. It was service by Canon Australia in 1999 and has had light use since as I'm enjoying
    a Canon EF and an F1-N more these days.

    My T90 often doesn't get used for several months at a time but I have not experienced any of the misbehaving shutter problems
    or the dreaded EEEE display. Although it has no foam in the camera back, excepting the 'Judas' window that shows film type, my
    biggest area of concern would be any internal foam that gets stuck on the shutter curtains. I have heard of this problem but I don't
    know where the foam would come from. (Unless it is the foam surrounding the window on the camera back. Might have to preemptively
    replace this foam).

    I trust my T90 but I would be wary of buying one second-hand at this stage in it's life. It's the camera body I choose if I'm in the mood
    for spot metering with 35mm, (F1-N with P screens give 12% partial metering pattern - nearly as useful), or I want TTL flash. I don't shoot
    motor sports any more so the winder is irrelevant.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by tokam View Post
    I've owned my T90 from new since 1987. It was service by Canon Australia in 1999 and has had light use since as I'm enjoying
    a Canon EF and an F1-N more these days.

    My T90 often doesn't get used for several months at a time but I have not experienced any of the misbehaving shutter problems
    or the dreaded EEEE display. Although it has no foam in the camera back, excepting the 'Judas' window that shows film type, my
    biggest area of concern would be any internal foam that gets stuck on the shutter curtains. I have heard of this problem but I don't
    know where the foam would come from. (Unless it is the foam surrounding the window on the camera back. Might have to preemptively
    replace this foam).

    I trust my T90 but I would be wary of buying one second-hand at this stage in it's life. It's the camera body I choose if I'm in the mood
    for spot metering with 35mm, (F1-N with P screens give 12% partial metering pattern - nearly as useful), or I want TTL flash. I don't shoot
    motor sports any more so the winder is irrelevant.
    In additionthe Canon focusing screen FN "S" spot screens for the New F1 have a 3° angle of view.
    Ben

  8. #48

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    And as a sidenote, the T90 was still a current camera in 1990. Popular Photography has it as one of the Top 40 cameras for 1990 in their December 1989 issue. However, it is not mentioned in the 1990 Best of for 1991 issue.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I've owned a T90 for about 20 years and it's always worked faultlessly but I have never trusted it, if I needed to come back with pictures not excuses and if my livelihood and that of my family depended on it I would rather use my New F1's.
    In Japan the T90 was widely used by photojournalists, earning the name "the tank" and gaining a reputation for reliability. Most of its failures are caused by being not used, sometimes for decades.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    In Japan the T90 was widely used by photojournalists, earning the name "the tank" and gaining a reputation for reliability. Most of its failures are caused by being not used, sometimes for decades.
    The second and more serious problem concerns the shutter. The T90's shutter appears to develop a 'sticky' nature as the camera ages. It is prone to locking up, in which case the camera's LCD displays "EEE" and the message "HELP" appears in the viewfinder display. This is commonly called the "EEE syndrome" among users. The problem is most likely to crop up after the camera has been left unused for some time; thus, the best way to prevent it is regular use of the camera. It does not seem to cause inaccurate shutter speeds before failure. The problem can be corrected by a knowledgeable technician without replacing the shutter mechanism. It is reportedly caused by dirt on the shutter's magnets affecting their performance.
    lower.
    The second and more serious problem concerns the shutter. The T90's shutter appears to develop a 'sticky' nature as the camera ages. It is prone to locking up, in which case the camera's LCD displays "EEE" and the message "HELP" appears in the viewfinder display. This is commonly called the "EEE syndrome" among users. The problem is most likely to crop up after the camera has been left unused for some time; thus, the best way to prevent it is regular use of the camera. It does not seem to cause inaccurate shutter speeds before failure. The problem can be corrected by a knowledgeable technician without replacing the shutter mechanism. It is reportedly caused by dirt on the shutter's magnets affecting their performance.
    When and if my T90 starts misbehaving it's going in the bin.
    Ben

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