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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    12
    Went to a local camera show today and held a bunch of cameras. The Nikon F, Nikon F2, Leicaflex, and Nikkormats definitely felt superior in build quality compared to most of the other mechanical cameras such as the OM series, the Nikon FM2, the Spotmatics and other Pentax cameras and such. I'm probably not gonna go for the Leicaflex due to lack of lens and accessories compared to the Nikons. And price. The EOS-3 is pretty tempting too, and that'll definitely be taken into consideration even though I was originally looking for a full mechanical camera. I definitely underestimated the build quality and ergonomics of the EOS-3 and 1 series. But yea, my decision has pretty much been made up and I thank all you guys for the help! You know it's a great forum when you can get 3 pages worth of advice in only a day.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Toronto ON Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    547
    Prices for the ETRS body and accessories is very inexpensive compared to similar quality 35mm cameras. Backs and other accessories including lenses are a complete bargain. A complete system including the speedgrip, back, body, metered prism and standard lens can be had in the $200+ plus range. There are several versions of the backs but none are expensive.

    As for working with moving subjects, with the prism (metered or non-metered) and speedgrip the camera handles like a 35mm SLR so it has the same limitations and advantages. There is an advantage if using the 35mm back in that you can see the subject in the viewfinder before it is in the 35mm lines so ther eis a bit more advanced notice if a 1 eyed shooter. If using the 120/220 backs it is the same as the viewfinder in a 35mm camera. Using the waist level finder takes practice to get it right but it can be done. Remember it a lot of photos of moving objects were taken before the advent of the reflex mirror system in the main stream market. JUst takes a little practice. I used to shoot the ETRS with the wlf and my Rollieflex all the time at soccor matches and out in the field shooting wildlife.

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