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  1. #21
    ravenheadphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Legge View Post
    Sincere question for those suggesting a Rollei 35 -

    At what age can kids learn to shoot manual? By 8 or so, I could imagine understanding some form of correlation between settings when I took a photo and the results. At 4, I'd expect most kids to just turn knobs and push buttons. It seems like something with automatic exposure would make more sense. Maybe I'm just underestimating 4 year olds though?
    I don't think you're underestimating the average 4-year-old. I'm a father of two and work around elementary-age children just about every day.

    I second your opinion about the Rollei and would add that the Rollei 35 uses scale focusing, which is something that plenty of adults I know would have a hard time using effectively, to say nothing of a 4-year-old. My own daughter just turned 7, and my wife and I were discussing camera possibilities for her. As bright and intelligent as she is (and according to people who give us their unsolicited opinions, she's very much so), we think that something more complicated than a point-and-shoot, fixed focus camera would just make her lose interest at this age. If Zoe wants a film camera, I would recommend the same for her.

    ~Ken

  2. #22

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    I give my 3 year old disposable cameras all the time to shoot with and she loves them.

    My 3 year old has a Kodak cameo, a National Geographic Binocular kids camera, and a Nikon N65 (I was going to sell it, but with the plastic lens she can handle it quite well with me around, she has some problems waiting for the auto focus, and can only use it in Program). She loves shooting with these cameras, and the disposables. By my experience I say stay away from anything that takes more than a split second to focus is no good, also avoid exposure controls as well, basic point and shoot should be fine for now.

    Honestly, a nice little fixed focus point and shoot with motor drive film advance that cost about $50 to $90 in the 1980's can be had for about $10 on ebay and they take really great photos.

    Some of the brick like cameras from Nikon and Canon can do really nice things, but I prefer the Kodak Cameo or something similar because it is a nice small camera that is easy to handle as a kids first camera.

    I personally learned with a Kodak 126 that my grandmother gave me when she got a 110, then I got the 110 when she got a new 110.
    Last edited by bblhed; 06-20-2011 at 02:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  3. #23
    spacer's Avatar
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    Yeah, it's gonna be completely automatic at first. As she grows, if she shows interest in creative control then we'll work on that.

  4. #24

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    When my grandchildren turned 2 I bought them a Canon point and shoot that had several modes including auto. The off/on switch was green so it was very easy to teach them how to use it including zooming the lens. My guess is that you have a friend or relative that has a similar camera gathering dust since they went digital. Now other than me, my family has gone digital so the most recent grandchildren don't use film. I recently taught the 2 1/2 year old to use a camera in literally minutes they all can use electronic gadgets, phones, ipads etc. so a camera shouldn't be any different.

    Whatever you get she will love shooting with you and you will be impressed with her results -- the kids have a fresh point of view.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #25
    spacer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffreyg View Post
    When my grandchildren turned 2 I bought them a Canon point and shoot that had several modes including auto. The off/on switch was green so it was very easy to teach them how to use it including zooming the lens. My guess is that you have a friend or relative that has a similar camera gathering dust since they went digital. Now other than me, my family has gone digital so the most recent grandchildren don't use film. I recently taught the 2 1/2 year old to use a camera in literally minutes they all can use electronic gadgets, phones, ipads etc. so a camera shouldn't be any different.

    Whatever you get she will love shooting with you and you will be impressed with her results -- the kids have a fresh point of view.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
    That's kinda what I'm really looking forward to. Zoe definitely has her own way of doing things, and I'm very curious as to how that will come out in photos. Besides, it might even freshen up my own perspective too.

  6. #26

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    Seeing their world through their eyes is enlightening. Just teach her the basic mechanics and leave the compositions and subjects up to her.

    Jeff

  7. #27

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    Scrap the Rollei 35, any of the brick cameras full auto from the 80's will work. Minolta Hi-matic af
    5x7 Eastman-Kodak kit / B+M 135mm Zeiss Tessar + Compur Deckel
    RB67 Pro S /50 4.5 / 90 3.8 / 180 4.5 / WLF / prism finder / polaback
    FED-2 / 50 2.8 Industar 26m / 85 f2 Jupiter-9
    Canon 300v / A2

  8. #28
    Selidor's Avatar
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    Your daughter deserves the best, no? Thus the choice is elementary: Phase One 645 plus IQ180 digital back.

    On a slightly more serious note, I also had a Fisher Price 110 camera when I was that age (1993). That thing was indeed tough, and capable of surprisingly good exposures. You could turn the flash off too. Ah, how I loved ripping into the foil of a new pack of Kodak Gold... But It had a horrible viewfinder (like some really awkward binoculars arrangement; they should have used the Nikon F3HP as a starting point...) and it badly needed a macro mode, which is ironic because I never do any macro work as an adult, which leads me onto this...

    Seeing their world through their eyes is enlightening. Just teach her the basic mechanics and leave the compositions and subjects up to her.
    +1.
    OM-2n, 50/1.8 (Black) | AE-1 Program, 50/1.8 (Silver)
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    My other little piece of the Web.

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