Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,659   Posts: 1,481,488   Online: 1103
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    What exactly is the definition of a 'prime' lens? Is it your one and only, your favorite, etc? How can you have multiple prime lenses?
    There are two definitions. An original "correct" one, and a misuse of the original "correct" one that has become so commonly used that it is now a definition in and of itself.

    The original definition (from the motion picture industry) is a fixed focal length lens, to which accessory wides and telephotos are attached. You might call it a "base" lens in other words. An example with a still camera would be the Yashica Electro 35. It has a fixed-length, permanently-affixed normal lens – the "prime" lens – and accessory wide or long converters can be placed in front of the prime lens to achieve different angles of view. This is the technically correct definition, but it is outdated given it's almost complete lack of use in commonly-used present-day photo technology.

    In very common usage (which does count as a definition, however incorrect it's original usage may have been), a prime lens is a fixed-focal length lens, as opposed to a zoom lens.

    The usage of the word "prime" to describe a non-zoom lens grates on me, but that does not mean that this meaning is completely incorrect, when you consider what a "definition" means in the world of etymology. Common use is enough to qualify something as a definition.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    335
    sure you don't want a 28? here's what happened to me--i was saying "i hate 28" for twenty years; since i switched the 28/2.8 for a 28/2 i've been taking about half my pictures with it. looks like i hated it being slow ok, the 28/2 has much more character as well...

    the 24 i sold almost as fast as i got it--every picture was yelling, "hi, i'm a 24!" with the 28, i'm not sure sometimes the picture is not from a 50--just the subject, no formal distractions

  3. #13
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Latte Land, Washington
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    832
    Good morning;

    I have and use the lenses in the range you mention.

    I like the 28mm focal length, and I often use the 24mm focal length. When I get to the 20mm focal length, at that point I start to really notice the "wide angle lens" effects, and I must start to really be careful in watching where the lines go with that lens. It only gets worse as I go shorter than 20mm, even with the well known "rectilinear 4.0/17mm" lens.

    For me, 28mm is fine, and the 24mm focal length is where I at least check to see that everything is still where it should be, or do I need to move up or down to get an errant line into the proper relationship with the rest of the scene.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    655
    I'm weighted to the wide angle end of things. The 28 is my real favorite, and I'm comfortable with the jump to 20mm if the subject "asks" for it. TV and PJs shoot with really short focal lengths these days and the young, it seems, have adjusted to this. My son lives on the 24 but it's a netherland to me. In the mid-70s a man who shot for the local paper told me something like 'The 50mm is the most boring lens. But if you can't make a good shot with it you have some homework to do'. My take is: 20, 28, 35, 105. Otherwise, it's the 28, every time.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,810
    This may be a perfect reason to use zoom.... having dozens of people agree on focal length mean nothing IF op doesn't like it. I'd suggest getting an inexpensive (relatively speaking...) zoom, try it out, and see what you like. Then get a prime. You can always sell your un-needed lens right here on APUG classified.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    46
    I just traded my Nikon 24-120G for a 1.8/50 and a 2.8/28 because I found the zoom far too big and heavy. It felt like I was holding a brick. I will be using them on the D200/700 as well as the F100. The 28 is not a D, unfortunately. I kept my 70-300G just on case.

  7. #17
    André E.C.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,520
    Images
    12
    Get the 24mm f/2.8 D, it's a gem of an optic. Want wider? Get the 20mm f/2.8 D in case you use loads of flash, if you don't, forget the D's.


    Cheers

  8. #18
    Paul VanAudenhove's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    350
    I prefer the 28mm over the 35mm - but that's just my taste. I'm a little confused why the OP wants a wider prime other than 'to see differently' from a 50mm. If that's the case, shooting any other fixed focal length will teach that. It took me a while to get comfortable shooting with a 28mm when I first got it.

    As a very loose rule, a 28mm (or, some will say, a 24mm) is about as wide as you can get without being obviously wide angle. A 20mm or wider becomes more challenging to get a shot without it being obviously wide angle. (I shoot my 20mm with a grid screen, just to help keep things lined up.)

    If your limitation with the 50mm is that you find yourself 'running out of room,' then I would suggest either the 24mm or 28mm. If you want more of a wide angle look, the go for the 20mm or wider.

  9. #19
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't. Some days 35mm feels normal, other days 85mm feels more normal. Some days 24mm is too wide, other days 14mm isn't wide enough. One can never have too many primes...
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  10. #20
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,537
    Images
    3
    2F/2F, thanks for the explanation.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin