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  1. #31
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostcount View Post
    Canon eye control - available on the EOS Elan IIE, EOS IXe, EOS-3, EOS Elan 7E, and EOS Elan 7NE
    It's similar to a system that was developed for helicopter gunship pilots in Vietnam using " sight switches", so they could aim and fire their munitions quickly and instinctively without taking their hands off the controls.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 07-18-2011 at 01:18 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  2. #32

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    Obviously the system doesn't work well enough. Canon never put it into their top of the line cameras like EoS-1n or 1v. Nor that they put it in any of their DSLR.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    Obviously the system doesn't work well enough. Canon never put it into their top of the line cameras like EoS-1n or 1v. Nor that they put it in any of their DSLR.
    I've never owned one Chan but I used to sell them, and I found they didn't work for everybody, I couldn't make them work for me, but some customers thought they were the best thing since sliced bread.
    Ben

  4. #34
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    Back to the OP: Sounds like you have many options. Having seen a SRT101 dropped from a 600ft cliff (not quite sheer, but damn close) and recovered without having a single issue other than physical blemishes good for a story. Likewise, the Nikkormat I used for a while was from a Vietnam press corp member and had literally been through mud, rain, dropped on everything, and was used in firefights.....today it works like a charm. Both were delightful to use, robust and have solid lenses for reasonable prices.
    K.S. Klain

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    Agree 100%. The veneration of relics like SRTs, OM1s, Nikkormats, and AE1s and other 30+ year old cameras ignores the rock-bottom prices on much newer AF models like Nikon's that work nicely as manual focus bodies. Know very few people who will shell out as much--often more--than their "classic" mechanical cost for a competent CLA and/or fix. Bought a very clean Nikon N90s for way south of $100 last year. Who wants a crusty late 60's SRT 101 with battery issues and looming age-related problems? For what's left of the analogue era, I'll take newer/better/cheaper/plentiful any day. What's the point of a retro fashion statement?
    You are starting with the false assumption that newer *is* always equal to better.

    Mechanical shutters hardly ever fail suddenly: they (sometimes) slowly become less accurate over decades. Electronic shutters definitely are prone to instant and unexpected failure (been there, done that...).

    "Battery issues" are a non-issue (or, more of an imagination-challenged issue).
    The only purely age-related problems are foam seals (for those cameras which have them) and cheap (usually East Block European) cloth shutters sometimes age badly.

    AF focusing screens *do* work poorly for manual focus (if you'd ever used a truly good focussing screen/veiefinder/viewfinder system, you'd realize that).

    So to the OP, do get a "crusty old 1960's relic": it might well need a CLA, but then it will last you a lifetime, unlike an auto-everything camera which is only as reliable as its weakest transistor.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  6. #36

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    I have a Canon EOS Rebel and don't really like it. The auto focus is fairly quick but the image stabilization causes a LOT of shutter lag. It's fairly good-handling but feels like a plastic piece of shit. The auto focus, IS and auto advance eat batteries.

    The Minolta MD mount X-570 is my favorite. So much about it is just plain right. I used a Pentax ME Super for almost 20 years before getting this one, but it just isn't as good as the X-570.

  7. #37
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    You are starting with the false assumption that newer *is* always equal to better.

    Mechanical shutters hardly ever fail suddenly: they (sometimes) slowly become less accurate over decades. Electronic shutters definitely are prone to instant and unexpected failure (been there, done that...).

    "Battery issues" are a non-issue (or, more of an imagination-challenged issue).
    The only purely age-related problems are foam seals (for those cameras which have them) and cheap (usually East Block European) cloth shutters sometimes age badly.

    AF focusing screens *do* work poorly for manual focus (if you'd ever used a truly good focussing screen/veiefinder/viewfinder system, you'd realize that).

    So to the OP, do get a "crusty old 1960's relic": it might well need a CLA, but then it will last you a lifetime, unlike an auto-everything camera which is only as reliable as its weakest transistor.
    No dice. Newer is newer. Low rollage oldies are an exception but petroleum-based lubes used in the shutter trains gum up and require service that's getting rare and pricey and harder to find(ever notice the constant pleas for service leads on elderly cameras hereabouts?).

    Funny I've never had Nikon AF shutter/metering electronics fail--ever. That's including hard, unsympathetic use in a few cases including wet/damp/dusty/impact/vibration/temp extreme conditions on high-rollage used bodies as well as new. My only problem with an "electronic" Nikon is a slightly faded LCD meter display on an early F3.

    Mickey Mouse/survivalist solutions with o-rings and short-lived hearing aid batteries are a PITA workaround for old gear that used mercury batteries. Sure it's possible but who needs it when AA-powered cameras are available?

    AF cameras work nicely for MF with MF lenses, especially Nikons. Yes I've used cameras with all kinds of focus aids/screens and don't find the AF models inferior with their electronic rangefinders. Your opinion perhaps but not my experience re: AF screens and manual focusing.

    Overall, parts and service are becoming an issue for many older MF bodies as makers refuse service on old stuff and veteran service techs retire or pass on.

    Old is old. It's fun to use but don't downplay the baked-in limitations and expense involved in shooting old equipment.

  8. #38

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    CGW! The AF screens are harder to focus that is if you don't use any focusing aid. using electronic rangefinder then it doesn't matter what kind of screen it is. But if I get an slr I want to focus with the focusing screen and on any part of the screen not just the center or at an AF point.

  9. #39
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    CGW! The AF screens are harder to focus that is if you don't use any focusing aid. using electronic rangefinder then it doesn't matter what kind of screen it is. But if I get an slr I want to focus with the focusing screen and on any part of the screen not just the center or at an AF point.
    Then just do it! How do you cope with a central focus aid on a MF camera when focusing on an off-centre point? Not having this problem at all with Nikon AF bodies.

  10. #40

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    I use no central focus aid. i use no focus aid of any kind. When i bought the F2AS and F3HP the first thing I did was to buy a D type screen to install in them.

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