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  1. #41
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    CGW! The AF screens are harder to focus that is if you don't use any focusing aid. using electronic rangefinder then it doesn't matter what kind of screen it is. But if I get an slr I want to focus with the focusing screen and on any part of the screen not just the center or at an AF point.
    Then just do it! How do you cope with a central focus aid on a MF camera when focusing on an off-centre point? Not having this problem at all with Nikon AF bodies.

  2. #42

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    I use no central focus aid. i use no focus aid of any kind. When i bought the F2AS and F3HP the first thing I did was to buy a D type screen to install in them.

  3. #43
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    What's the point of a retro fashion statement?
    Girls were attracted to my silver OM-1n like moths to a flame, but they just don't dig my "professional black" OM-2n in the same way. I was tempted to get a silver OM-2n for that very reason, but so far Im managing to keep my vanity in check

    To the OP: An AE-1 is better than an OM-10. An AE-1 Program is even better still, and since theres so many out there I would just wait until you managed to snag an AE-1 Program for around the price of a vanilla AE-1.

    Naturally there are other great cameras out there as mentioned by previous posters, and you may be surprised what you can get for <£100 - even Nikon F3's.
    As a previous OM-1n owner, I can tell you its a fine camera but you will either need to get it converted to take modern batteries, or use wein air cells that dont last particularly long (depending on usage, of course). An OM-2n solves this problem by using modern, common LR44 batteries (and is better in other ways) but will cost more.
    OM-2n, 50/1.8 (Black) | AE-1 Program, 50/1.8 (Silver)
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  4. #44

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    I think we should also remember the OP needs a lens for his £100.

    I suggest browsing Ffordes rather than ebay. If AF is fine, then there's some great bargains - plenty of sub £50 models with zooms attached. Should get a 6 month warranty too.

    www.ffordes.com
    Steve.

  5. #45
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    Then just do it! How do you cope with a central focus aid on a MF camera when focusing on an off-centre point? Not having this problem at all with Nikon AF bodies.
    Well, my reference in that field allows snappy, easy and accurate focus *anywhere* on the field.
    Think a Nikon H screen (you have tried one, right?), but much better...

    I'll repeat, I find that focusing an AF nikon body (I do still have one) with MF lenses a real PITA. But De Gustibus....
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  6. #46
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    No dice. Newer is newer. Low rollage oldies are an exception but petroleum-based lubes used in the shutter trains gum up and require service that's getting rare and pricey and harder to find(ever notice the constant pleas for service leads on elderly cameras hereabouts?).

    Funny I've never had Nikon AF shutter/metering electronics fail--ever. That's including hard, unsympathetic use in a few cases including wet/damp/dusty/impact/vibration/temp extreme conditions on high-rollage used bodies as well as new. My only problem with an "electronic" Nikon is a slightly faded LCD meter display on an early F3.

    Mickey Mouse/survivalist solutions with o-rings and short-lived hearing aid batteries are a PITA workaround for old gear that used mercury batteries. Sure it's possible but who needs it when AA-powered cameras are available?

    AF cameras work nicely for MF with MF lenses, especially Nikons. Yes I've used cameras with all kinds of focus aids/screens and don't find the AF models inferior with their electronic rangefinders. Your opinion perhaps but not my experience re: AF screens and manual focusing.

    Overall, parts and service are becoming an issue for many older MF bodies as makers refuse service on old stuff and veteran service techs retire or pass on.
    *Even* electronic shuttered and auto-everything cameras need CLAs, probably just as often as purely mechanical ones.

    About pleas for help: I've heard just as many pleas concerning what to do with a dead as a doornail electronic wonder.

    I've used my cameras (not only Nikons) over the years in all the conditions and situations you listed, and have had at least 4 electronic ones suddenly fail (including a Nikon FE2). No manual camera has ever left me in the lurch...

    Old batteries: installing a rubber O-ring isn't exactly rocket science!
    I use a self-made adaptor with a diode (similar to a CRIS(?) adaptor) and use silver cell batteries with it. Disadvantages? Probably adds 1 second to the battery changing time... Hardly what I'd call a PITA!
    Maybe, perhaps some people also find most AA powered cameras completely unattractive...

    Re MF focusing with AF bodies, see my previous post.

    Mechanical bodies can almost always be fixed. In the worst case, a good technician can always manufacture a part, not that machanical cameras often need new parts. It's electronic and "newer" cameras that need entire proprietary modules replaced (therefore being 100% dependant on original spares) when something goes wrong.

    I think the best we can do is agree to (strongly) disagree.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  7. #47

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    Since no one else has suggested this yet, I guess that I will have to. There are literally thousands of excellent M42 screw-mount cameras that are well within your price range, including several in the classifieds, that are well within your price range, and that fit all of your criteria. Pentax, Fujica, Yashica, Chinon, Ricoh, Zenit, Praktica, Pentacon, Mamiya-Sekor, Contarex ... the list goes on and on. And thousands of legendary screw-mount lenses from the major manufacturers as well as third-party sellers. Don't overlook these cameras, or you will miss out on some all-time classics from the golden age of SLR cameras.

  8. #48
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    Well, my reference in that field allows snappy, easy and accurate focus *anywhere* on the field.
    Think a Nikon H screen (you have tried one, right?), but much better...

    I'll repeat, I find that focusing an AF nikon body (I do still have one) with MF lenses a real PITA. But De Gustibus....
    H/G screens are focal length/aperture specific--really handy(?).

    YMMV but I've never had any issues with MF lenses on AF bodies. I happily use the 45/2.8 Ai-P(you've tried one, right)on an N90s-- a near-perfect street rig for me.

  9. #49
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    Nikkormats and Spotmatics are the way to go for me. The spotties have a wide lens choice, from the cheap and good, to the very expensive ones. With nikkormats pre ai lenses are priced OK.

  10. #50

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    In the end it comes down to what kind of camera you like to use most. In my photo kit there are fully manual metal bodied 60s and 70s SLRs through to AF 1990s stuff. I use them all but my preference is for simple to operate manual focus cameras that have an auto exposure option, so I prefer analogue dials over LCD screens and push button menus.
    Most manufacturers made this kind of camera in the late 70s and early 80s and all but the Pro versions are within your budget.

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