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  1. #1

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    DIY cleaning on film camera

    Hi guys, opinion, is it possible to do a DIY cleaning of the Focusing Screen on a nikon FM3A? will it spoil the camera? I noticed my camera has some dusts that is visible from the viewfinder. Need help~!

    If its possible, how to do it? any unique chemicals etc etc?

  2. #2

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    While I am
    Not familiar with that model of camera, I have successfully cleaned several focus screens.
    To clean the underside is easy, go in from the front with lens off and mirror down.
    Usually to get to the upper side generally requires removal of the top cover and prism which is a piece of cake on some cameras but a right pain on others.

    The cleaning method I use is a damp tissue folded up and held in fine tweezers. Careful not to touch focus screen or mirror with tweezers and only wipe gently and change the tissue a couple of times.
    This will clean off dust but will not harm the screen.
    Fresnel screens are generally made of a very soft plastic that is fairly vulnerable to chemicals, so I'd be cautious of using anything much stronger, although a water based lens cleaner might work.
    Straight water works well enough for me so far.

  3. #3

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    Cleaning a focusing screen is relatively easy if you do it with some care, but chances are this is not going to eliminate all the dust in your viewfinder. If there's dust on the focusing screen, there's usually dust inside the viewfinder prism as well. Cleaning that takes a lot of courage.
    I would use a dry microfiber cloth or simply some compressed air (very carefully) for the focusing screen.
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  4. #4
    mr rusty's Avatar
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    Risk v Reward.

    In my experience, cleaning focus screens can be a pain. Even on my olympus, where the focus screen comes out easily as it is interchangeable it is very difficult to eliminate all dust. Even the tiniest speck shows as a little black dot. If I had to start dismantling the camera. I don't think I would bother. After all, it doesn't affect the picture. Unless it is *very* dusty, I wouldn't bother

  5. #5
    BobD's Avatar
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    I wouldn't advise using any sort of liquid cleaner. Remove the screen and gently brush or blow the dust off.

  6. #6

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    On my old Canon F-1 you can remove the focus screen and clean it. But in your case it might be more trouble than it's worth it.

    Jeff

  7. #7
    CGW
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    Why do people respond to these threads when they really don't have a clue?

    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...reenchange.htm

    Just be aware these FM/FE series screens are plastic and scratch easily. Use a bulb blower or clean soft camel's hair brush to remove any dust--that usually does the trick. Using liquid cleaners and tissues is really a last ditch remedy and ups the likelihood of permanent scratches. Take your time.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    Why do people respond to these threads when they really don't have a clue?

    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...reenchange.htm

    Just be aware these FM/FE series screens are plastic and scratch easily. Use a bulb blower or clean soft camel's hair brush to remove any dust--that usually does the trick. Using liquid cleaners and tissues is really a last ditch remedy and ups the likelihood of permanent scratches. Take your time.
    To bump their post count perhaps?

  9. #9

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    Hey, if you think someone is wrong you don't need to be offensive about it.
    Regarding my reply I said straight up that I was not familiar with that model but the method I mentioned is one that I have successfully uses on several occasions on various cameras, usually ones with hard to remove screens.
    I dis make one mistake, I assumed although didn't specify that the OP has already tried using a blower. That is the first thing I do and only use the tissues and water If that doesn't clean it to my satisfaction.
    I have never had any damage from using thus method although if you are ham fisted you could do a lot quickly.
    I never said this was the best or only method, just one I had used SUCCESSFULLY in the past.

    Also I don't give a flying **** about post count.

  10. #10

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    Cleaning the screen is simple and striaght forward when done properly. Worst-case is scratching the screen and/or damaging the bracket that holds the screen. Do not use any liquid. Learn how to properly remove the screen. Preferable to use the Nikon tweezers to release the bracket and hold the screen. Use a RocketBlower or equivalent to blow dust/debris. Consider holding the screen with two fingers by opposite corners as a Blower can quite easily dislodge the screen from tweezers. Blow upward so as not to launch more debris while holding screen close to a soft surface in case of drop. If debris persists, use a proper brush, Pec Pad or equivalent to extremely gently dab the offending bits of debris. Use a fraction of a fraction of the pressure you might otherwise use to dab debris from your cornea. Do not use any liquid. Do not 'brush' across the entire surface unless absolutely necessary. The aim is to oh-so-softly dab and lift. Use the brightest light you can find and a magnifier to examine. While screen is out, Rocket Blow the mirror box. Ensure that screen is properly seated in bracket before returning bracket to 'locked' position.

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