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  1. #21
    zsas's Avatar
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    OP - when you shot indoor, did you use the 1/100 or B shutter speed? If B how long did you hold it down?

  2. #22
    zsas's Avatar
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    I just metered in my house blinds up, mid day, sunny outside, meter at floor. I bet if you wanted to photograph inside during the day with 100 speed film and a f8 lens, you would need about a 1 second exposure, ie, hold down the shutter for one second while in B mode. Were you previously shooting indoor in 1/100 shutter mode? That would explain the under exposure.


    I highly suggest a book by Henry Horenstein - Black and White Photography. It will really help you get all this down, ie the photographic triangle (shutter, film speed and aperture)

    Keep trying and keep asking questions! We want you to succeed in film.

  3. #23

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    Shoot a third roll? What is that saying? Something about "doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result."
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #24

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    Looks like it’s a fixed 10mm f/8 lens with 1/100 second and B shutter. It lists multiple exposure capability.

    http://microsites.lomography.com/fis...pecifications/

    If so, then the exposure for the central area should be about correct at f/16 in sunlight with ASA 100 film.

    This translates to a 2-stop overexposure for the central area at the fixed f/8 aperture the lens is equipped with when used under a sunny sky.

    In those conditions an ASA 400 film would overexpose the central area by 4 stops.

  5. #25

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    Google "Sunny 16" and spend about 1/2 hour perusing what you find. Read with 3 facts in mind: 1)you have an f8 aperture, 2) you have 1/100 shutter speed, 3) you use either iso 100 or 400. It will soon become very obvious why your pictures were so bad and what you might do to get decent results with it.

    It really is very limited in the circumstances in which it will produce good results. There are reasons most people of a different generation than yours call those cameras pieces of junk.

  6. #26
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elammm View Post
    But an ISO of 400 is alot better for picture taking right?
    No.

    There are three basic variables for any exposure.

    1-Time
    Your camera can do ~1/100 or "B" where you simply hold the shutter open for as long as you hold the button down.

    2-Aperture
    Your camera ~f/8, not a variable.

    3-Sensitivity
    ISO or EI. The bigger the number the more sensitive it is.

    In your specific camera using the normal 1/100 shutter speed, 100 ISO film is best for bright sunny shots, ISO 400 for late afternoon outside or shaded mid-day shots, maybe inside with fairly bright lighting.

    To do a nice job inside you may need to use "B" mode with the camera sitting on something solid.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post

    To do a nice job inside you may need to use "B" mode with the camera sitting on something solid.
    Thanks, I'll be getting some 400 film anyway, any idea of the time range i'd have to use B mode for inside?
    Look At My Blog Or My Flickr Too See My Photo's
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  8. #28

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    Your lomo seems to have a very limited range adjustments, similar to the old Box Brownie or 127 Brownie. With a 400 film from one of the top three manufacturers( Ilford Fuji Kodak) you might be OK outdoors but your scope is very limited.

    I'd give serious thought to a reasonable secondhand 35mm camera with a full range of shutter speeds and apertures. There are plenty about for reasonable prices. Then buy a book about taking shots. There are plenty of those about at reasonable prices as well.

    Ironically the simpler the camera i.e. the more restricted its controls then the more experienced the photographer needs to be to: either recognise when he can and can't take good photos or when he can, to a limited extent, take action to make an acceptable photo

    If you are new to analogue photography and want success as quickly as possible then get the kind of camera I mention above.

    I wish you luck if you stick to the Lomo but I fear that sticking to the Lomo will end in tears more often than not.


    pentaxuser

  9. #29

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    May I ask how much does this camera cost you? But I thought if you want well exposed, sharp pictures you don't go for Lomo stuff. I thought Lomo stuff are for fuzzy strange looking images.

  10. #30
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elammm View Post
    Thanks, I'll be getting some 400 film anyway, any idea of the time range i'd have to use B mode for inside?
    For a well lit room, some where between 1/4 second and 2 seconds. To be more sure, you need a meter. If your camera is one with a built in flash you could use it, but I doubt that the flash will illuminate more than the centre of the image.

    You need to have the camera on a tripod or otherwise held still for this to work.

    EDIT: The Lomo fisheye isn't a good choice to learn how to use film. It is a relatively inflexible special purpose instrument. If you are trying to learn how best to use film, there are many, many options that would be much more likely to satisfy.

    If you do pick up some experience and knowledge using something else, you might then want to re-visit the Lomo fisheye, because if you like the fisheye effect, it is a reasonably inexpensive way to experiment with it.
    Last edited by MattKing; 08-04-2011 at 05:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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