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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by elammm View Post
    Thanks, I'll be getting some 400 film anyway, any idea of the time range i'd have to use B mode for inside?
    Probably around 1/16 to 1/4 second. Awfully hard to do.

  2. #32
    zsas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elammm View Post
    I know it wasnt the lab, it was probably me, 2 rolls have failed, going to try a third roll now, on sunny clear days, whats best conditions for iso 100 indoors? like how bright should a room be etc? 3rd times the charm?
    If you have a roll of 100 speed left, dont shoot it indoors, shoot it outdoors at 1/100. I think it will prob work then.

  3. #33
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    Before you buy anything else, I'd suggest that you go to the library and read a basic photography textbook, or at least the chapters on films and other supplies. The knowledge within will allow you to make the necessary decisions for shooting and selecting materials to use. You are going to learn very slowly and very poorly, and waste a lot of money ruining film, if you attempt to learn the basics of photography from scratch in an Internet forum, post by post as questions come up. At the very least, do yourself the favor of reading some sort of basic guide.

    That Lomo film is a ridiculous price too. Why pay over twice as much for who-knows-what kind of film of who-knows-what age? It is likely just dollar-store film (Ferrania, maybe?) in a fancy box. I'd just get some Fuji Superia or Kodak Gold from a pro photo store if you want nice results, or ultra cheap expired film or dollar-store film.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  4. #34
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    Lomo film is Shanghai GP 100. I'm not going to jump on the Lomo bashing train here (although I certainly have my opinion) but don't buy anymore of that film. I shot an entire roll with nothing developing other than the frame numbers and for some reason the design from the backing paper (it was 120 film). Even the rolls that developed had faint designs from the backing paper. Try a regular consumer film. I'd recommend two rolls, one 100 ISO and one 400 ISO. As you use that camera, and hopefully learn more about photography, I think you'll naturally want more control and options and grow into something else. But until then, I say shoot away with that Lomo camera, just don't buy anymore Lomo film.

    To answer your original question, with that camera and 100 ISO film, you'll want to use a flash inside with a close subject, or have sunlight shining on your subject through a window. But seriously, you'll only grow more frustrated by ordering more of that Lomo film.

    EDIT: I just realized my avatar was taken with that Lomo film.
    Last edited by Dshambli; 08-04-2011 at 07:00 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Irony.

  5. #35
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    Shooting ISO 100 film indoors at f/8 will likely get you what you say you got i.e., dark/black photos with visible detail only at the windows unless you used a long exposure (on B) which would also require a tripod.

    Shooting 400 film under the same conditions would be a little better but still not great.

    I suggest shooting your camera outdoors in sunlight and either taking a course in basic photography or at least reading a basic book on the subject. Shooting film isn't as easy as shooting with digital automated cameras with built-in flash, etc.

    Shooting film indoors with available light requires a fast film and a fast lens and some basic photo knowledge.

  6. #36

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    With 1/100th of a second and f/8, regardless of film, forget about shooting indoors with it. That's basically outside, bright daylight only. Those are very similar specs to a disposable camera.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by elammm View Post
    Thanks, I'll be getting some 400 film anyway, any idea of the time range i'd have to use B mode for inside?
    Well that's a variable based on the brightness of the scene.

    Given that the "B" mode will not truly be accurate at short speeds, under say 1-second you may be better off pushing the shutter seveval times, say twice or four times, as long as you can hold he camera still.

    The "B" mode will work fine with a 1001, 1002, 1003 count. Again you will have to hold the camrea still.

    Without a meter, it is a guess and you will need to waste some film to figure this out.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #38

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    I see this 10 golden rules about Lomography on Wiki. and if these are true then you do just fine.
    1.Take your camera everywhere you go.
    2.Use it any time – day and night.
    3.Lomography is not an interference in your life, but part of it.
    4.Try the shot from the hip
    5.Approach the objects of your Lomographic desire as close as possible.
    6.Don't think! Just Shoot (also the credo of Lomography).
    7.Be fast
    8.You don't have to know beforehand what you captured on film.
    9.Afterwards either.
    10.Don't worry about any rules

  9. #39

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    What camera are you using again? Do a proper metering before you shoot something

  10. #40
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    FYI the Lomography lomo 100asa film is mde by ferrania imaging. It's the same film as the Lomogrpahy red scale 100 just reversed. Both films are Ferrania color FG plus.
    I did a blog post on where to find the info once.. If interested I'll find the link.
    Addicted to caffenol processing
    Will buy stereo cameras, Any Autographic camera with red bellows
    OR Any Vanity or Petitie Kodak Camera -working

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