Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,476   Posts: 1,542,654   Online: 788
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 40 of 40
  1. #31

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    northern england
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    606
    Quote Originally Posted by ChristopherCoy View Post
    At this point I have to decide whether to pay the $30 and pick up the camera, pay the $163 and pick up the camera, or just let them keep the thing for their boneyard.
    Many people say get a CLA as a matter of course but I beg to differ. I have 20 + old SLRs of various makes, manual through matrix and have only had one CLA'd and that was while fixing a separate problem.

    The reality is cameras of your Nikon's era are mechanically sound but have ancient metering technology which is a specialist fix and spare parts are from donor bodies. I'm not saying don't have the repair done but it takes your $30 camera into a different league of expense.
    My first response to receiving any camera is to check cosmetic condition, that knobs and dials all work correctly and put a film through, then process it in a familiar developer.

    If negative density is as expected and nothing squeaks or falls off the camera is fit for purpose. There is no other criterion of accuracy than a good negative. I had five Nikkormats at the last count (I had more but gave some to friends) the forerunner of the FE/FM and the metering works correctly in one, is dubious in another and the rest don't work at all. To fix them all would mean a considerable financial outlay but I use Sunny 16, carry a hand meter or confirm with a second camera body I trust the metering in.
    They cost between £20 and £40 with a mint example at £50, a great price for a fine camera and I'm happy to ignore their antique circuitry and appreciate the excellent engineering that delivers the shots.

  2. #32
    BobD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    California, USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    437
    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    Older(?) version had a shutter release lock.

    When I realized mine didn't have one, I felt cheated at the time, though in my model the advance lever does that when flush with the body (and I assume that the one with the coaxial lock didn't).
    You're correct but Nikon called it a Shutter Operation Mode Selector. It does lock the shutter release but that is secondary (according to the manual). Its main function is selecting whether the camera is used with or without the motor drive. Evidently it was possible to damage the camera if it wasn't set to the MD position when using a motor. The trouble was that few owners were aware of that and failed to set it correctly so Nikon eliminated it in an updated version.

  3. #33
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    The Armpit of Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,196
    Images
    28
    IT WORKS! IT WORKS!!

    After hum-drumming about the email all afternoon, and allowing the news to take the wind out of my sails, I decided that I was just going to go and pay the $30, pick up the camera, meter manually, and run some film through the camera. If it worked it worked, if it leaked light, then well... I was out $64 and a roll of film. If later on I decided I wanted to get the FM overhauled, then I knew what it would cost and I could proceed at that point.

    Well, I just picked up the camera about 30 mins ago from the repair shop. I paid the $30 inspection fee, and went on my way. I couldn't wait anymore, so at a red light, I lifted the camera, took off the lens cap, moved the advance lever out the 35 degrees and voila... little red LED lights.

    I have no idea what the tech did overnight, I dont know if he simply cleaned the battery contacts, or if he reattached some wires inside... but it works.

    I'm going to run some B&W film through it this weekend, or as soon as I can get my hands on a few rolls.

  4. #34
    fstop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    696
    Quote Originally Posted by BobD View Post
    You're correct but Nikon called it a Shutter Operation Mode Selector. It does lock the shutter release but that is secondary (according to the manual). Its main function is selecting whether the camera is used with or without the motor drive. Evidently it was possible to damage the camera if it wasn't set to the MD position when using a motor. The trouble was that few owners were aware of that and failed to set it correctly so Nikon eliminated it in an updated version.
    You can tell by the serial number what it is, 3XXXXX series don't have the shutter lock, 2XXXXX have it.

    Sellers on ebay don't realize this and sell the better 3XXXXX for the same price as the 2XXXXX

  5. #35
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    The Armpit of Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,196
    Images
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by fstop View Post
    You can tell by the serial number what it is, 3XXXXX series don't have the shutter lock, 2XXXXX have it.

    Sellers on ebay don't realize this and sell the better 3XXXXX for the same price as the 2XXXXX

    Mine has serial 22494420 and I dont see a shutter lock... unless I'm looking at something incorrectly.


    ETA: My apologies. I just read the manual, and mine does have the shutter lock thing. Its the dial around the shutter button that has red and black marks.
    Last edited by ChristopherCoy; 08-17-2011 at 07:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    261
    Very frequently, in a simple circuit which is what the metering systems of the 70s were, corrosion at contact points was due to the passage of electrons across dissimilar metals. Once, as a favour to a friend, I took apart a Kodak super 8 camera and found some internal corrosion, cleaned it off and restored it to her in a working condition. Probably what happened was the tech opened up the camera and did the same thing to determine the feasibility of repair. After all the repair company wouldn't want to quote on something that was going to be a monster to repair and lose money.
    David.
    (Nowadays it's a throw-away camera world)

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    northern england
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    606
    Quote Originally Posted by ChristopherCoy View Post
    IT WORKS! IT WORKS!!
    Excellent news. There's more chance of old cameras dying in cupboards and drawers because their owners think a meter repair is too expensive than wearing out because they're being used without a CLA. Cameras require use!

  8. #38
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,810
    [QUOTE=blockend;1224398]Many people say get a CLA as a matter of course but I beg to differ. I have 20 + old SLRs of various makes, manual through matrix and have only had one CLA'd and that was while fixing a separate problem.

    The reality is cameras of your Nikon's era are mechanically sound but have ancient metering technology which is a specialist fix and spare parts are from donor bodies. I'm not saying don't have the repair done but it takes your $30 camera into a different league of expense.
    My first response to receiving any camera is to check cosmetic condition, that knobs and dials all work correctly and put a film through, then process it in a familiar developer.


    If negative density is as expected and nothing squeaks or falls off the camera is fit for purpose. There is no other criterion of accuracy than a good negative. I had five Nikkormats at the last count (I had more but gave some to friends) the forerunner of the FE/FM and the metering works correctly in one, is dubious in another and the rest don't work at all. To fix them all would mean a considerable financial outlay but I use Sunny 16, carry a hand meter or confirm with a second camera body I trust the metering in.
    They cost between £20 and £40 with a mint example at £50, a great price for a fine camera and I'm happy to ignore their antique circuitry and appreciate the excellent engineering that delivers the shots.[/QUOTE

    This philosophy is like having several second hand cars that the syncro has gone on the gearboxes you have to double de clutch on every time you need to change gear and you have to start every time with a crank handle, and although I always carry a hand held meter one of the joys of 35mm SLR photography is the spontaneity which for some types of shots is essential.
    I know it's "different strokes for different folks", but early in my working life I was trained as an engineer, and I would rather have a lot fewer cameras that have been properly maintained that are reliable than many that have faults
    Last edited by benjiboy; 08-18-2011 at 08:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    368
    My origianl FM (with film advance lock and metering mechanism) still performs likne new. And I've had and used it since the mid 70's. Great, reliable camera.

  10. #40
    Pumalite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Here & Now
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,078
    My FM is worth a lot to me. Never a CLA. Never failed.
    " A loving and caring heart is the beginning of all knowledge " ~ Thomas Carlyle ~

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin