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  1. #11
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Assuming that every new example of the lenses performed identically when they were manufactured after 25-35 years of use and misuse how can you compare the performance of one lens that I have with one that someone at the other side of the World has ?.
    The Canon FD 50 1.4 lens was an industry standard in it's day all kinds of official bodies, government and military organizations used them, if you buy either the breech lock or the bayonet fitting version in good condition you won't be disappointed.
    Ben

  2. #12
    Focus No. 9's Avatar
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    i don't understand. the fd is both breech and bayonet

  3. #13

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    I can't speak for the breech-lock lens, but my FDn is a very good performer wide open. I found it much sharper at f1.4 than the much-praised FD 85mm f1.2L at f1.2 or 1.4. I don't know if that comparison is worth much, just wanted to mention it.
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  4. #14
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    On reflection I've owned a Canon FD 50mm f1.4 breech lock lens for almost forty years and don't think I've ever used it wide open, and rarely at f2.8.
    Ben

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Focus No. 9 View Post
    i don't understand. the fd is both breech and bayonet
    The "bayonet" lenses are cleverly modified, so that the lens attaches with an action similar to that of a bayonet mount type of lens. Instead of mounting the lens and then twisting a breech lock ring to tighten it, the lens is mounted and the lens body turned to tighten it. They are still breech lock lenses; the way the lock is actuated is different.

    I find the "bayonet" type to be a little faster and easier, as it's all done easily one-handed, where with the original design a third hand to hold the camera would have been useful at times. The original design, though, is simple and widely considered more rugged, as the new design is, by comparison to it, complex and delicate.
    Last edited by lxdude; 12-19-2011 at 12:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #16

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    The breech lock lenses are cocked, and the ring spins by itself most of the way; then you just need to tighten it a bit. They are easy as pie to put on with one hand. OTOH, I find having to press the silver button on the later ones to be a PITA.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #17
    Trask's Avatar
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    I can remember that Canon's advertising back in the day for the breech-lock system highlighted the fact that as the mount wore through years of use, the user could still assure solid contact between lens and lens mount by tightening the lock ring just that little bit more. This, presumably, was in contrast to Nikon and other mount lenses that bayonet into place -- were the lens mount to wear, there's no way to tighten the lens/body contact beyond the end stop of the bayonet.

    I've got both breech lock and twist to lock Canon lenses, and I'll confess that I do worry a tiny bit about vibration loosening the breech lock as I'm walking along. It has never happened, perhaps because I keep tightening the breech lock out of paranoia.

  8. #18
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trask View Post
    I can remember that Canon's advertising back in the day for the breech-lock system highlighted the fact that as the mount wore through years of use, the user could still assure solid contact between lens and lens mount by tightening the lock ring just that little bit more. This, presumably, was in contrast to Nikon and other mount lenses that bayonet into place -- were the lens mount to wear, there's no way to tighten the lens/body contact beyond the end stop of the bayonet.

    I've got both breech lock and twist to lock Canon lenses, and I'll confess that I do worry a tiny bit about vibration loosening the breech lock as I'm walking along. It has never happened, perhaps because I keep tightening the breech lock out of paranoia.
    How many thousand times do you need to change lenses on an 18/8 gauge stainless steel lens mount to wear it, my engineering training tells me this is advertising agency bull shit.
    Ben

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    How many thousand times do you need to change lenses on an 18/8 gauge stainless steel lens mount to wear it, my engineering training tells me this is advertising agency bull shit.
    Well I bought a Canon lens at a boot sale with the mount abused (someone must have tried to force the lens on a different camera) and after filing and straightening was pleased the breech lock design took up the slack....... re "I can remember that Canon's advertising back in the day for the breech-lock system highlighted the fact that as the mount wore through years of use, the user could still assure solid contact between lens and lens mount by tightening the lock ring just that little bit more. This, presumably, was in contrast to Nikon and other mount lenses that bayonet into place -- were the lens mount to wear, there's no way to tighten the lens/body contact beyond the end stop of the bayonet."

  10. #20
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur2 View Post
    Well I bought a Canon lens at a boot sale with the mount abused (someone must have tried to force the lens on a different camera) and after filing and straightening was pleased the breech lock design took up the slack....... re "I can remember that Canon's advertising back in the day for the breech-lock system highlighted the fact that as the mount wore through years of use, the user could still assure solid contact between lens and lens mount by tightening the lock ring just that little bit more. This, presumably, was in contrast to Nikon and other mount lenses that bayonet into place -- were the lens mount to wear, there's no way to tighten the lens/body contact beyond the end stop of the bayonet."
    This is irrelevant because how many people buy FD lenses whose mounts have been filed down ? I repeat my question regardless of what Canons advertising copywriters write, how many thousands of times does an FD lens need to be mounted and dismounted to cause any significant wear to either the lens or the 18/8 gauge stainless steel camera mount ? probably more than you can do in a lifetime.
    Ben

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