Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,691   Posts: 1,548,919   Online: 793
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25
  1. #11
    jp80874's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Bath, OH 44210 USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,436
    Images
    6
    You can use a large golf umbrella. Run the handle inside your shirt and under your belt. That should hold it in place unless there is a strong wind. In 1962 I was working in Germany for the summer. It rained the three days of Nurburgring, the German Grand Prix F1 races. I had what would now be a large heavy old fashion 300mm lens on a Pentax 35mm. The umbrella was red with large white dots. As I approached, people would first laugh and then realize that the camera and I were still dry.

    John Powers
    "If you want to be famous, you must do something more badly than anybody in the entire world." Miroslav Tichı

  2. #12
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,467
    Images
    74
    As long as it's not blocking people's views, I think an umbrella would be ideal.

    If it's on and off rain, like passing thunderstorms, just put the camera away or stand under an awning.

    Gray weather is great for photography, as there are lots of photo possibilities without having to worry much about shadows. Many things are visually appealing or more interesting when wet too. (not just people)

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    North America just north of that sharp right turn North America makes on the Atlantic coast.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    602
    I like the Umbrella idea, but I would like to say that you should have a storage plan to go with it. Something that you can put the camera into when you are done shooting so that it stays dry.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  4. #14
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,389
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    439
    You can do this with any large plastic bag - put the camera inside the bag, with the lens on. Remove any filter you have on the lens, pull the bag tight across the lens front, then screw the filter on. The filter threads will cut the plastic, but leave just enough edge for the filter to grip. Remove the filter, pull out the plug the filter cut from the bag, and re-install. Voila- instant raincoat for your camera! If you do it with a big trash bag, you can fit yourself and the camera inside (make sure to leave enough room at the bottom so you get air and don't suffocate). If you use a gallon or so size Ziploc, you can still fit the camera and your hands inside. They also sell clear plastic semi-re-useable rain ponchos at CVS for a couple bucks each. That might be an even better option.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    116
    Quote Originally Posted by mablo View Post
    I use a Nikon FM. No need for rain cover.
    It's pretty doubtful AI/AIS lenses are weather sealed. Not only are you risking getting crap in your camera, but you could work water into your lens encouraging fungal growth or water vapor fogging.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    16,412
    Blog Entries
    2
    a sombrero

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,105
    The plastic bag tricks work really well and are very easy and inexpensive. No need to go buy a commercial product in my opinion.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMD View Post
    you could work water into your lens encouraging fungal growth or water vapor fogging.
    My 50mm f/1.4 Nikkor did indeed get water fogging in the rain forests of Costa Rica (I found out just why they are called that). What I did to solve this problem was leave the lens under a small floodlight for around an hour on both front and back. This seemed to evaporate the water. Lens is still working fine two years later.

  8. #18
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    A good rain overcoat and a good rain hat will help quite a lot. One of the many bag tricks that are posted will cover the rest. I am a fan of regular plastic shopping bags and/or static cling wrap. I also use a lens hood, of course. Gaffer tape is good for covering exposed odds and ends, and jointed/overlapping areas such as focusing collars on lenses or advance knobs.

    Be sure to bring small dry towels for touching up water spots that hit the camera, and don't pack your camera away in a bag until it has dried out for some time first. Get some desiccant pouches if you can as well.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #19
    Toffle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Point Pelee, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,796
    Images
    122
    My brother in law gave me a plastic tent with an "optical" plexiglass window from a surgery. (not stolen... they have to be discarded after opening ) A little cumbersome but it works.
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mountain House, California
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    18

    The plastic bag idea is the best, I think

    I use clear plastic office trash can liners and rubber bands. I do this on both film and digital cameras. I place the camera (even with a flash attached) inside the bag and tear an undersized hole for the lens, then put the rubber band around the outside. If I have the flash attached, I simply put a rubber band around the flash head and tighten the bag so that there is little air gap between the flash lens and the bag. Lastly, with the bag draped over the camera, I tear a small hole for the eyepiece. I usually remove the eyepiece, then secure the bag around the eyepiece socket with the eyepiece itself. One thing you can't argue with is the value and portability of this solution. Wad up a few with some rubber bands and stick them in your pocket. Throw them in the plastic recycling when you're done.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin