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  1. #11
    Selidor's Avatar
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    As a regular (long-distance-)hiker, it's a dilemma I've also often faced.

    For the most part, I've gone over to the "dark side" on longer walks because of the weight advantage.
    When still using film, I'll either choose a rangefinder kit (more compact and slightly lighter) or a lighter SLR.

    My own lens choices are along the lines of 20, 35 & 90mm (depending on the system used).
    You could (should?!?) definitely add a wide-angle to your 50mm, maybe a 28 or a 24mm.

    FYI:
    Weight:
    Leica M6 + 21, 35 & 90mm: 1080 grammes
    As above + 15mm: 1274 grammes
    Rolleiflex SL35-E + 18, 35 & 85mm: 1326 grammes
    Nikon FE2 + 20 (Soviet), 35 & 105mm: 1579 grammes (bloody 105 is heavy!)
    Leica R5 + 19, 35 & 90mm: 2108 grammes (bloody heavy lenses!)
    "Dark side" camera with 25-300mm equivalent zoom: 270 grammes
    Some interesting numbers there!
    Actually if I had the lens I really want I wouldn't have asked this question - its a Tokina 12-24mm f/4 ATX for the D3100. I always want to go wide when I travel, but I only travel with digital and only take portraiture - my true love - with film, for which a 50mm isnt really long enough. But new lenses cost money, and money like roll film is a finite quantity I actually had a 22-55mm lens for my EOS 1n but both went in "The Great Equipment Firesale of Summer 2011" when I realised I had more cameras than fingers.

    The D3100 and OM-2n have little difference in weight I think. My dad has several Canonets I could use but Im not a fan of rangefinder focusing, plus I wont get to use my fancy B+W filters
    OM-2n, 50/1.8 (Black) | AE-1 Program, 50/1.8 (Silver)
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  2. #12
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selidor View Post
    I dont want to get into a film v digital debate (though perhaps I have!)
    Indeed. And I think your posts struggle mightily to stay within the bounds of analog photography. But it seems APUG has become much more lenient of late to digital talk. Ahem.

    IMO this is more a matter of artistic/aesthetic focus on your part. Pick one format/camera to express yourself.

    I don't think you can beat belt packs for convenience in carrying limited photo equipment. Spin them around to you belly when a scene becomes irresistible. You can use a daypack in combination to carry your food and extra clothes, as well as your tripod. Really, nothing beats a regular suspension backpack of your choice for carrying everything together, if that is your choice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Selidor View Post
    Im always on the lookout for the next piece of art I can hang! Uploading to flickr/facebook just does not compare to printing and mounting. But I do the former primarily. I currently scan & print at 8x10 because a local supermarket sells nice black 8x10 frames cheaply.
    Frankly, I don't see any reason to shoot anything other than digital, if the internet is your goal. Film's extra bang comes mainly from love of process. Few people, and less and less as time goes on, will ever appreciate or even have the opportunity to see a handcrafted film originated fine art print.

  3. #13

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    Here's the kit that I finally was able to put together.
    I find that I prefer this to my SLR kit.

    First I started off with a Black Contax G-2, with the
    following Black lenses:
    21 mm f 2.8 Biogon,
    28 mm f 2.8 Biogon,
    45 mm f 2.0 Planar,
    90 mm f 2.8 Sonnar.

    About the lenses: I'm not disappointed one bit with
    what they do on b&w or colour film.
    They are everything I had hoped these
    versions of the Contax G lenses would be.
    Tonality, shadow detail & sharpness are way up
    there. The T* Coating is probably optimized
    for colour, but seems to work well in B&W, as well.

    I find that there is something VERY SPECIAL
    about the Biogon lens design.

    The 28 mm has a " stretch ", that makes it look
    like a 24 mm SLR lens, but without the distortion &
    The 21 mm has no " discernible " distortion at all.

    I mention this here as a prelude because to augment,
    this system I've added a Black Bessa L, ( labeled
    Cosina 107 SW ), with the following Black lenses:

    The 12 mm f 5.6 &
    The 15 mm f 4.5 lenses.

    Both of these appear to be Biogon designs as well.
    While they don't have T* coatings, they are both
    Apochromatic, so I know they are similar in sharpness.

    With the Contax G-2 being AF & the Bessa L lenses
    being Hyperfocal Focus, focusing is NOT an issue.

    All told this is a lot lighter than an SLR.

  4. #14
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selidor View Post
    As for backpacks I thought about sticking to my Jansport Trinity. Its a popular school/college backpack - indeed I used it for school originally. I ruled out a cheap but decent North Face one because it was 3L smaller and that extra 3L meant I could carry my sleeping bag, as I often do when couch surfing across the UK. But it does come with proper back support and extra straps etc, so perhaps in the name of comfort It would be worthwhile.
    OT: Yikes! A good modern backpack will definitely make a difference compared to an old Jansport bag.
    While it might not help your legs on long climbs, your back will feel like it's carrying *many* kilos less (subjectively taking your camera & other things for "free").

    Some North Face bags are o.k., but they are more often fashion items than real mountain gear.
    Get some advice & have a look at Lowe Alpine, Deuter, Bach, Osprey, Vaude & Golite bags...
    Fit is very important: the back length should match yours so that the hipbelt can carry most of the weight.
    Last edited by Rol_Lei Nut; 10-07-2011 at 02:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  5. #15
    Selidor's Avatar
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    Indeed. And I think your posts struggle mightily to stay within the bounds of analog photography. But it seems APUG has become much more lenient of late to digital talk. Ahem.
    I cannot apologize enough, perhaps this question might have been more suited towards a general forum such as photo.net but because my primary medium is film I posted here without much further thought.
    Frankly, I don't see any reason to shoot anything other than digital, if the internet is your goal.
    I dont shoot photos to share with others, I shoot photos because it makes me happy! I only upload work to the internet because the technology exists to make it easy and affordable

    Anyhow what Im hearing is that an SLR might be on the heavy side, in which case a rangefinder would be a good alternative.
    So I found my dads collection of Canonets - a QL 17 GIII, QL19, QL25, 28. However the only 100% working model appears to be the Canonet 28. The focusing method of aligning the light patch isn't as tricky as I remember.

    Among other things he also has a Nikon FG-20 with a set of Nikon 28/50/135 AIS lenses. The FG-20 is markedly lighter than my OM-2n. However Im not sure Id be happy taking his pristine Nikon equipment along, incase something should happen to them.
    Really, nothing beats a regular suspension backpack of your choice for carrying everything together, if that is your choice.
    Yikes! A good modern backpack will definitely make a difference compared to an old Jansport bag.
    This suddenly became my No.1 priority! I've clearly underestimated the need for a decent backpack.

    Re: The North Face - I did my research into brands, knowing little about the outdoor clothing market and the general consensus seems to be that although no one has benefited more from the active lifestyle/wilderness chic popularity of the 90's and 2000's than TNF, and they've milked it for all its worth, the bottom line is their products get the job done no less than Rab/Mountain Equipment/Haglofs etc. Their 27L Borealis day-sack is on sale right now and is at least 2x as large as Deuter and Lowe Alpine bags at the same price point. I dont need anything bigger than 30-35L, but at the same time I couldnt do with anything significantly smaller.
    OM-2n, 50/1.8 (Black) | AE-1 Program, 50/1.8 (Silver)
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  6. #16

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    Depending on the physical challenge of the walks, a shoulder bag can be useful (e.g. LowePro) especially if your "treks" are more along the lines of walk, pause, photograph, move on, rather than hiking to a particular location with tripod and 4x5". The shoulder bags can however make one rather unbalanced when any scrambling (which I try and avoid in my size 14s) is necessary and do become uncomfortable on steeper paths.

    Tom

  7. #17

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    As I and others have mentioned, a properly fitting backpack is the way to go regardless of the weight you will carry. Which ever brand you decide on get one that is at least water resistant and preferably waterproof and has an opening flap that opens all the way. I also recommend one that may seem larger in capacity than you think you need since you don't always have to fill it completely but better to have ample capacity if the occasion arises. The Tamrac pack I mentioned (page 1) is adjustable and has inserts that can be configured as needed. Having had three back surgeries over the years I highly recommend the right pack and good hiking shoes.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  8. #18
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selidor View Post
    Re: The North Face - I did my research into brands, knowing little about the outdoor clothing market and the general consensus seems to be that although no one has benefited more from the active lifestyle/wilderness chic popularity of the 90's and 2000's than TNF, and they've milked it for all its worth, the bottom line is their products get the job done no less than Rab/Mountain Equipment/Haglofs etc. Their 27L Borealis day-sack is on sale right now and is at least 2x as large as Deuter and Lowe Alpine bags at the same price point. I dont need anything bigger than 30-35L, but at the same time I couldnt do with anything significantly smaller.
    OT: There I might disagree... ;-)
    I'm out walking, hiking, trekking every chance I get and my cherry-picking of outdoor gear is almost as bad as with camera eqipment.

    Some TNF stuff is very good, but the majority isn't as good as other "serious" brands. While they might "get the job done" as well, lighter and more comfortable equipment makes life that much easier.

    Backpacks are like shoes: you should really go into a shop and try some on before buying, as fit is a very individual thing. Try them weighted with what you expect to be the maximum weight you'd carry (plus some) and walk around as long as you can without being forcefully ejected from the shop.
    Classic, if somewhat fiddly, advice is to bring what you want to carry to the shop and stuff it into the bags you want to try.
    Keep in mind that the size rating of bags can vary greatly in reality: my SO's 32 litre bag holds much less than my 25 litre one.

    I'm not familiar with that particular TNF bag, but again, you should really try before buying, especially since sales occur quite frequently in the UK (I often buy my gear mail-order there). A good bag will last a very long time and it's worth spending more for something really comfortable.

    This could be useful as a starting point for choosing bags to look at (in my experience, the reviews seem pretty well done and fit the stuff I have quite well):
    http://www.livefortheoutdoors.com/Gear-Reviews/

    Enjoy!
    Last edited by Rol_Lei Nut; 10-07-2011 at 03:01 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  9. #19
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    Unless you want to get tricky or artistic, you don't need the extra weight of the DLSR. Further, there's no reason for a film compact when the 2 35mms in your sig line are already quite compact (especially with just a small prime lense).

    Take the W-30 digi compact for any quick and dirty landscape snapshots, stuff like that. For wide fixed areas DSLR is somewhat wasted. Then take either the OM-2n or the AE-1P (my ride of choice, also -- it handles quite well) but if you can load it out with a 28mm or some wide angle.

    I find that for landscapes your eyes take in so much more than a basic 50mm can capture. It really helps spark the memory and imagination when looking on the finished photo product if you shoot it with a wider angle to cover more ground.

    Then you just have to carry the 1 camera which is pretty light with that size of lens, and then tuck the compact into a pocket somewhere.
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

  10. #20
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    Somebody mentioned a tripod... but I was going to offer an alternative idea: Find a collapsable monopod! Then, collapse it to just the right length to be a walking stick (or find one that doesn't collapse and just hold it lower down when hiking! Add a rubber grip or some boxing tape around where you want to hold it, etc)
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

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