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  1. #21
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markster View Post
    Find a collapsable monopod! Then, collapse it to just the right length to be a walking stick
    I wouldn't be without my Leki Sierra - An adjustable hiking stick that comes with a 1/4" thread for a camera - As a monopod, it is a little whippy, but it is a lot lighter than a "proper" monopod. Admittedly, I also carry a CF tripod as the Leki won't cope with 5x4.

    Before anyone asks - I go hiking/backpacking with 5x4 and on the last trip managed to squeeze camera/tent/sleeping bag all in to a 30l pack. For simple day hikes, I find a smallish Lowpro pack to be more than adequate, but then my style of hiking/camping might not suit many tastes

  2. #22

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    Regarding the CanonQL17, if the camera is in the "A" mode, it won't work without a battery.
    It will work as a fully manual camera when it's off the A. unless the shutter baldes are stuck from disuse.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  3. #23
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    I don't see any reason to shoot anything other than digital, if the internet is your goal.
    Agreed.

    And if the goal is something to show on the wall or hold in the hand then film - of a format appropriate to the end product - is still the hands-down technical winner.

    My lite weight camera choice for the past 15+ years been a Yashica T4/T5.

    Recently I have taken to carrying a Zeiss Nettar 120 folder instead. Guestimate distances and exposure. I have a Cascade Designs hiking stick with a Leitz ballhead and I carry a cable release: the f6.8 lens makes for longish exposures. If you go the folder route you should look for a camera with a shutter that has slow shutter speeds. See http://www.certo6.com/cameras for 120 folders.

    Last week I ordered a Nikon N75 with the lite weight 28-80G lens. Should be about 23 oz all up. http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/n75.htm
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 10-07-2011 at 07:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
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  4. #24
    MattKing's Avatar
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    If you find the OM2n too heavy, an OMG/OM20 is a lot lighter, and quite competent.

    It isn't as rugged though as an OM2n.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #25
    fmajor's Avatar
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    Selidor - since you already have a great camera (though admittedly, i know very little which lenses in that mount are best.....) i'd really encourage you to use it.

    Since your Olympus OM2n is a smaller frame SLR it will be lighter to carry (and thus you can bring more film!!!!), there are outstanding Zuiko lenses available for it, you get to shoot traditional b&w (and use your covetous "b&w" brand filters!!!!) and really enjoy the slowed down process of making photographic art for your walls. It's a win-win-win at every turn.

    As to backpacks..... they are part of what i do for a living and have used for 30-odd years... "The North Face" company, while it's not what it used to be, isn't necessarily a *bad* choice - and i am a self-admitted *1st-rate* TNF critic (i usually refer to them as "The North *Farce*). I'm not personally familiar with the model you were looking at, but i have a general grid for evaluting packs which i use for initial screening.

    Since you're in the UK, you have reasonable access to the excellent RAB company's offerings as well as to some other great companies. Honestly, i'd be searching for bargain packs b/c for most day-hiking/trekking, the offerings today are utterly brilliant.

    THings to ensure your pack choice has - an *included/attached* water-proof cover (this is a requirement not an option), plenty of space - 30Ltr main-bag volume should be more than enough (though a 40Ltr pack isn't out of the question depending on anticipated weather), stiff/thick shoulder padding (not the soft, squishy garbage that will ultimately hurt/chafe your shoulders), a reasonable waist-belt, external mesh pockets, loop/daisy-chain attachment points, robust zippers (YKK 10 is perfect size for the main-volume zipper) and an internal sleeve/external access for a water reservoir (Camelbak/Platypus, etc). These are the basic "features" i look for in a day pack.

    Here are some of the "quality" criteria i use to evaluate a pack prior to purchase. Incidently, quality is also a requirement - ya can't afford a cheap pack as you'll be replacing it soon enough, but it's hard to communicate "feel" of things..... The packs primary material *needs* to be water resistant, but not the heavy-duty, stiff PVC stuff which will easily (and quickly) develop cracks/degradations. Also, non-cotton stitching is preferred, but difficult to ascertain w/o looking at the pack. Primary attachment points (shoulder straps, waist-belt, gear-loops, etc) need to be multiple stitched/bar-tacked, etc. All straps/clasps/buckles/fixtures need to be Delrin or an equivalent (not plastic - a hybrid nylon/polycarbonate is preferred).

    The good thing is that these level of quality packs are reasonably priced and will last several years (depending on use).

    Finally, a good tripod is invaluble to get the most from your excellent Zuiko optics and squeeze the last detail from your negative.

    I hope this helps.

  6. #26
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fmajor View Post
    THings to ensure your pack choice has - an *included/attached* water-proof cover (this is a requirement not an option), plenty of space - 30Ltr main-bag volume should be more than enough (though a 40Ltr pack isn't out of the question depending on anticipated weather), stiff/thick shoulder padding (not the soft, squishy garbage that will ultimately hurt/chafe your shoulders), a reasonable waist-belt, external mesh pockets, loop/daisy-chain attachment points, robust zippers (YKK 10 is perfect size for the main-volume zipper) and an internal sleeve/external access for a water reservoir (Camelbak/Platypus, etc). These are the basic "features" i look for in a day pack.
    Or better still, a main compartment with a cover instead of a zipper.

    Some very good 30+ litre bags don't have built-in rain covers: a separate rain cover can be bought or even (what I actually prefer) an internal waterproof sack.

    Most of the specifications Fmajor listed should be met by any reasonably modern bag from the companies I listed in a previous post.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  7. #27
    fmajor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    Or better still, a main compartment with a cover instead of a zipper.

    Some very good 30+ litre bags don't have built-in rain covers: a separate rain cover can be bought or even (what I actually prefer) an internal waterproof sack.

    Most of the specifications Fmajor listed should be met by any reasonably modern bag from the companies I listed in a previous post.

    Rol_Lei Nut is right - my error. I'd say most 30Ltr sacks will *not* have an included/attached rain-cover - though some do. I'm not recalling which at the moment.... some Black Diamond sacks do, i *think* a Gregory model does, but they're US manufacturers....

    In any event, make sure you have a rain-cover. Back in the day, we used large leaf-collection bags and simply cut-away part of it to easily slip over the pack, but made-to-fit with elastic to hold the cover in place is far better.

  8. #28

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    I spent a couple of days last month backpacking in the Grand Canyon. Took a Mamiya C-330F and 80, 135, 180 Super lenses, and a Bogen tripod.

    I haven't printed yet, or even finished developing all the film, so I can't yet say if the photos were worth the weight. A couple of the negs look promising. Fun Trip.
    ---
    mike rosenlof
    louisville colorado usa

  9. #29

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    Go for the Olympus and its 50mm lens. Put your imagination to work on getting the most out of the least gear. Use medium speed film like 200 ISO to give you access to all your apertures. Shoot it like a wide-angle; shoot it like a tele. It works! Use very good, fresh film. Post your results so we can see!
    Have fun!
    Vic

  10. #30
    wy2l's Avatar
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    I hike with a Pentax 67, with much suffering. Works for me.

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