Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,694   Posts: 1,549,000   Online: 861
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31
  1. #21
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,089
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Markster View Post
    This doesn't work because in SLR cameras the film is shot in landscape (narrow side across the film strip) and in motion the film is shot in portrait (long side across the film strip) so it would be too wide to fit in the camera unless you manually trim the film and add your own sprocket teeth....

    Not really a feasible option, and motion film isn't exactly cheap.


  3. #23
    Aristophanes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    505
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    I believe Fuji only makes the one 1600 colour film.

    They make 200, 400, 800, and 1600 according to both websites above, and their main international (English) website:

    http://www.fujifilm.com/products/fil...egative_films/

    You'll note that the same speeds are present on the English and Japanese websites.

    However, B&H states that 1600 Superia is "Discontinued".

    Fuji's marketing is absolutely awful.Their main website says something untrue when relayed from a major international supply house.

  4. #24
    LunoLuno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kanagawa JAPAN
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    58
    There're some interesting articles relating color temperature and a daylight balanced film on Fuji's Japanese website. It explains basically about the exposure program of their Natura film and cameras (NP mode), but I think the theory can be applied to any daylight balanced color films. I don't think there's anything new to the experts here, but it explains the theory very well.

    Pitty Google translation doesn't work very well with Japanese.

    Secrets of the NP mode 2: colors of light
    Secrets of the NP mode 3: colors of light
    Secrets of the NP mode 1: surprisingly dark?
    Secrets of the NP mode 4: look at the effectiveness of exposure compensation
    Last edited by LunoLuno; 10-13-2011 at 10:53 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #25
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,853
    Don't forget with an 80B filter you lose around a stop and a half of the films speed.
    Ben

  6. #26
    Markster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver area
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    307
    So much? Seems annoyingly high for this example of indoors shooting with ISO 100 film.
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Downers Grove Illinois
    Posts
    1,052
    Blue filter or fight it in scanning /printing. I have a bunch of 80 A filters and two or three rolls of Portra Tungsten 35 mm. frozen

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,089
    Images
    2
    Exactly that's why I was thinking of using an 82b filter that only looses about 1/3 of a stop, so while it's not fully correcting I was thinking of it as a compromise.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA., U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    228

    4 layer color neg films.

    There is something that all of you are failing to take into account.

    If the negative film in question is of the newer 4 layer color neg films,

    it will correct for the tungsten light on it's own. That's what it's

    designed to do. The days of getting that warm fireplace glow,

    are now out without Photoshop. Run a test for yourself...

    I know that the Fuji 1600 was & I think that both Kodak &

    Fuji 800 Pro films were, last time I checked.

    I just did a Nude Fireplace Shoot, last year, with available light,

    to get that warm glow & the images, ( even the fire ),

    were neutral...

  10. #30
    dehk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    W Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    885
    Kodak Vision 500T.
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin