Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,963   Posts: 1,523,168   Online: 784
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,089
    Images
    2

    In doors at night low light colour film options.

    OK it would seem that if you want to shoot indoors at night that even in the days when film was a lot more popular your best bet was to push 320T, I don't quite understand why there wasn't a demand for fast colour negative tungsten balanced film, anyway there's a few options I'm leaning to.

    Shooting with Portra 800 and just correcting late.
    Shooting Portra 800 with an 82b and also correcting in post as a compromise.
    Shooting with Fuji 1600 or maybe even 400x pushed two stops and an 80b still even with such a fast film I'm left with the equivalent of 500 or 640 and my 50mm lens is only a 1.8 (I do need a 1.4.).

    I'm not sure if I can think of anything else, what would be the best option?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    816
    If you mean what is your best option in color film in terms grain then I rate the following from least to most grainy based on their box speed - Kodak Portra 800, Fuji NPZ800, Fuji Natura 1600, Fuji Superia 1600. Fuji Superia 1600 grain is not close to any of the others.
    I have also pushed process Fuji Provia 400F by 2 (1600) and gotten better grain then Fuji Superia 1600 but not as good as Natura.

    I wish Fuji Natura becomes available in the US!

    At box speed the following are very good - Kodak Portra 400, Fuji 400X and Fuji 400H. Again Fuji Superia 400 and Kodak Max 400 are not close to these.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,089
    Images
    2
    I wasn't really asking about grain, I know the Fuji 1600 will be the most grainy result but with an 80b filter the colour should be almost perfect with very little change needed in post, but I'm not sure if it's worth it. Are you sure Natura isn't just Superia 1600?
    I'm trying to take photos indoors at night under tungsten lighting with no flash, and I don't really want the colour balance to be too out. I know with the

  4. #4
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    New Portra 400 seems to be the best. Pushes well to 1600.

    Lighting these days is mixed, how many tungsten bulbs do you find? Most have been replaced by those awful flourescent bulbs that don't have the same temperature as the tubes.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  5. #5
    brucemuir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Metro DC area, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,265
    Images
    4
    I had good luck with Portra 800 under tungsten with no filtering at all.
    I think some of the fuji 4 layer stuff does well also.
    Not ideal but correctable.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    816
    Quote Originally Posted by ajuk View Post
    I wasn't really asking about grain, I know the Fuji 1600 will be the most grainy result but with an 80b filter the colour should be almost perfect with very little change needed in post, but I'm not sure if it's worth it. Are you sure Natura isn't just Superia 1600?
    All I listed are daylight balanced film and all will require the same treatment.

    I am sure that Fuji Natura (ISO 1600) film is not Fuji Superia 1600 and most evident in terms of grain.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    OH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,789
    Images
    2
    I usually just shoot Portra 800 and correct it later (after scanning). Portra 400 is preferable if I don't need the extra stop. If I'm going to be shooting ONLY under tungsten and I can spare the light loss, shooting with a KB 6 filter can help a bit with the colors without dealing with the full filter factor of something like an 80b. I've found that unless it's REALLY low color temperature light, shooting without a filter with either of the above films works pretty well.

    While there are a lot of compact fluorescents, many of them are still 'balanced' at tungsten-like temperatures. So the above still works, though you have to contend with the green with low CRI bulbs.

    I can provide you with links of examples if you want.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,089
    Images
    2
    I haven't got a KB 6 filter (80D) but I do have an 82B that I was thinking of using as a compromise are they quite similar?

  9. #9
    Hatchetman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    571
    Images
    6
    I don't think either of the Fuji 1600 films are made anymore.

  10. #10
    Markster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver area
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    307
    I was about to post a question on this very topic... I've noticed just how badly the Ektar 100 line is balanced to blue light when any kind of low-light indoors shot (even if there's enough light on the meter) comes out very yellow.

    What would be the best filter to counter-act this?
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin