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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Outside Boston, MA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    164
    As with so many other things, it's the cost of labour that often makes commercial repairs uneconomical.
    Yes, good point, Steve. The "not economical to repair" camera you get for free might be fixable with parts from another of the same model with a different problem, allowing you to turn two pieces of "junk" into a working camera. That's always been appealing to me.

  2. #12
    fstop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    652
    pdf copies of factory repair manuals are available if you look for them.

  3. #13
    rjbuzzclick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    251
    I'm kind of a tinkerer and enjoy taking apart cameras. I have no formal training, but have had pretty good luck. There is tons of information available online. If it doesn't work out with a particular camera, it becomes a good source of screws and parts, either for me or someone else. One of my earliest projects was assembling a working Petri Color Corrected Super 2.8 from two non-working cameras, including an aperture from one body and the shutter blades from another. I have less experience with cloth focal plane shutters, but only because I haven't needed to really tear into one yet. When I do, it'll probably be on a Zorki 4 or Pentax K1000 body, either of which cost me less than $25. For what I've purchased most of my cameras for, spending $100 on a CLA is not worth it and if I can, I'd rather do it myself.
    Reid

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rjbuzzclick/

    "If I had a nickel for every time I had to replace a camera battery, I'd be able to get the #@%&$ battery cover off!" -Me

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Floor-it-duh
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,040
    Images
    93
    I learned pretty much by getting it apart and back together. I have repaired successfully both of my DSLR's, two of my EOS 35mm's, an EOS flash (the 540ez I'm using now) and one of my 35mm Nikons, plus a few lenses from each.

    However my Canon L glass I send that off to the professionals. Could I repair it, yeah I could. But F that, I paid thousands of dollars for some of those, I don't want to make them worse than they already are. If I paid 1150 for a lens, I can afford a couple of hundred dollars to properly repair it, from a trained professional who fixes hundreds of these things a week.
    5x7 Eastman-Kodak kit / B+M 135mm Zeiss Tessar + Compur Deckel
    RB67 Pro S / 90 3.8 / WLF / prism finder / polaback
    FED-2 / 50 2.8 Industar 26m / 85 f2 Jupiter-9
    Canon 300v / 5D d*****l / L lenses

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    94
    Have a go!
    It can be fun and frustrating at the same time...
    I'm only a dabbler, but I've successfully with te help of another home camera repairer taken apart and sorted out a cranky Contaflex Super B as well as minor repairs to several other cameras.
    He knows more than I do about camera innards and helps me.
    My background with fitting and machining means I can help him with weird tools and so on.
    Just start wih something you won't cry about if you kill it and have fun. If it's not for then you will figure it out pretty quick.
    Those Tomosy books are good too.

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