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  1. #111
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Well, fstop, let's take a look at your statement:

    Quote Originally Posted by fstop View Post
    Obviously you never used it or used the mlu on the F2, F3 or Minolta.With F you waste one frame for every shot you want to use mlu.If you want to do a multiple exposure using mlu its impossible.
    Trying to push in the DOF button and twist the lever one handed is clumsy.
    As the subject was the Nikon F, your first sentence reads as comparing the F's MLU to the MLU's of the F2, F3 and Minolta. Your last sentence reads in context as referring to the F's MLU, which you had referred to as clumsy. You did not say it referred to the other Nikons.

    And why did you include "the Minolta"? Which one? The SR-T 101 I used to use had MLU, and it did not require pressing the DoF button. I never tried to do multiple exposures with the F, but I can't see any reason why they would be impossible with the mirror locked up.

    Myself, I never found the MLU procedure on the F2 or F3 to be clumsy. A little manual dexterity is all it takes. Very quick and easy.

    Your second sentence is wrong. One frame is lost; the mirror stays up and subsequent shots (like say, bracketing) are made until you move the MLU lever back to its original position. If what you meant was for every shot which is a whole new composition, OK- except with the 21mm and its separate viewfinder.
    Last edited by lxdude; 12-19-2011 at 10:47 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  2. #112

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    The mirror lockup on the Nikkormat FtN is perfect for my uses.Also, when using the selftimer, the mirror goes up as soon as you press the release, giving the camera 10 or 12 seconds to calm down. Much more convenient than the F, I don't need to carry a cable release.

  3. #113
    fstop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    Well, fstop, let's take a look at your statement:



    As the subject was the Nikon F, your first sentence reads as comparing the F's MLU to the MLU's of the F2, F3 and Minolta. Your last sentence reads in context as referring to the F's MLU, which you had referred to as clumsy. You did not say it referred to the other Nikons.

    And why did you include "the Minolta"? Which one? The SR-T 101 I used to use had MLU, and it did not require pressing the DoF button. I never tried to do multiple exposures with the F, but I can't see any reason why they would be impossible with the mirror locked up.

    Myself, I never found the MLU procedure on the F2 or F3 to be clumsy. A little manual dexterity is all it takes. Very quick and easy.

    Your second sentence is wrong. One frame is lost; the mirror stays up and subsequent shots (like say, bracketing) are made until you move the MLU lever back to its original position. If what you meant was for every shot which is a whole new composition, OK- except with the 21mm and its separate viewfinder.
    I'm talking about composing between shots, I do a lot of multiple exposure work combining daylight scenes with night time scenes using different lenses.You also have to rewind the frame which really makes a mess of positioning.

    as for being clumsy thats my opinion of its operation

  4. #114
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philosomatographer View Post

    I guess I really like the F, because there is no dead meter bits in the viewfinder, just pure concentration on the image :-)
    I remembered this again when I saw this photo in some review today

    cheers,
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails NOT a nikon F view finder.jpg  

  5. #115
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    Looks like a display for a computer game or a HUD from a fighter plane.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  6. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    I remembered this again when I saw this photo in some review today
    Ugh, I could never use a camera that litters the viewfinder display with such ugly, useless eye candy. Data overlays can be cool, but not this kind of data overlay... It's amazing how much we lost, when we lost physical, single-purpose controls (in consumer cameras). This has caused manufacturers to feel the need to litter viewfinders with all these icons.

  7. #117
    snegron's Avatar
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    Very nice images! I find the Nikon F is special in so many ways. I have been using Nikon equipment for the past 25+ years, however, I have owned cameras of different brands in that time. Among the many Nikon film bodies I have owned, the F ranks among the top 2 (the other is the F3HP). Some time ago I bubble-wrapped all my film gear (Nikon S2 rangefinder, F2A, FM2, F100, N80, etc.) but kept two bodies available; my F with FTN Photomic finder and my F3HP with MD4 motor drive. Imo, the F feels right in my hands. I find it fun to use, I always look forward to shooting rolls with it. I can't explain why I like shooting with my F, I just simply do! As for the lenses, I only use three Nikkors; 24mm 2.8 AIS, 50mm 1.4 AIS and 105mm 2.5 AIS.

  8. #118
    Pumalite's Avatar
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    Good choice
    " A loving and caring heart is the beginning of all knowledge " ~ Thomas Carlyle ~

  9. #119

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    When shooting negative film in the Nikon F, one really does not need a light meter - I thus enjoy the elegance of the plain prism, and took a couple of images in a quaint restaurant with very complex late-afternoon lighting. The dynamic range of Portra 400VC just "takes it all in". The character of the 1950s Nikkor lens designs are so very different to the OM Zuikos I am used to, but it's one than can certainly be enjoyed for what it is. Not as "smooth" nor as "sharp" as most Zuikos, but the image have a certain biting acutance to them. As ever, I love the focus accuracy of this remarkable viewfinder (and I am very used to the famous Olympus OM-1/2/3/4 viewfinders).


    (Nikkor-H.C 1:2 f=50mm @ f/2.0, Nikon F)


    (Nikkor-H.C 1:2 f=50mm @ f/2.0, Nikon F)




    (Nikkor-H.C 1:2 f=50mm @ f/2.0, Nikon F - very complex colour correction on this one, she was sitting in blue light, with warm sunlit background)

  10. #120
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    When I was stationed in the USAF in Japan between 1965-67, I bought a Nikon F Photomic T with 50mm, F/1.4 lens for $189.00 ($500 in the states) and added a 135mm Nikor although I forget what I paid. I knew nothing about SLR's at the time having only shot with a twin lens box cheapo as a tennager. Nikon was well known in 1965 as the 35mm camera so that's what I bought. Unfortunately, the kit was lost on a NYC subway a few years later. So I bought a Nikkormat with 50mm, f/2 with some non-Nikon zooms. The cost stateside was too prohibitive for me as a non-pro to buy the top-of-the-line.

    I still have the Nikormat but shooting medium format now when shooting film. I tried the 50mm on an E-PL1 m43 EVIL to see what it can do with digital sensors and if it's not blasphemy, here is the link http://www.flickr.com/photos/alanklein2000/5345148224/

    I've always had a soft spot in my heart for Nikon even buying their Nikonos IVa underwater camera which is built like a tank and shoots very sharply with its' 35mm lens.



 

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