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  1. #61

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    Thank you for all the complimentary replies - this roll was just one of those "test" rolls where you photograph everything in sight for a day or two to check out a new camera, but I am happy how it turned out. Looking forward to making some bigger-than-8x10in prints to really see what the lenses have in them. Although you can tell from an 8x10, usually, and I think both of these lenses will stand up as far as the film does.

    For example, in this image (shot at f/2.0) the small writing on the gentleman's glasses (which is exactly where I focused) is perfectly legible - kudos also has to go to this extraordinary ISO400 film to capture such small detail.



    Also, let's discuss metering: B&W film is so liberating. With a digital camera, people rely on all sorts of 1005-pixel CCD metering computers to get an exposure half as good as what one gets with a meterless Nikon F and guessed exposure. Think about how precisely I would have exposed the above on digital - or slide film - to place the visible zone of information where I wanted it? (along the way, I would definitely have lost shadows and highlights). With a Nikon F, it's so simple. What aperture do I want for this shot? f/2.0. Then guess: In this light, what shutter speed do I need at ISO400 to expose correctly for f/2.0. Answer: 1/2000s. Nikon F only goes to 1/1000s? Bummer. Well, just shoot it at 1/1000, it will be exposed sufficiently on B&W film. Simple, end of story.

    And very liberating. Of course, all my film bodies are the same in this regard (my OM-3Ti's batteries died some time last year, never replaced them). I guess I really like the F, because there is no dead meter bits in the viewfinder, just pure concentration on the image :-)


    To kitanikon, I did exactly the same thing: I fitted the B focusing screen which has none of the focusing-aids graffiti of the others, just a pure, clear focusing experience. Mine is dirty (some strange subtle liquid stains, need to clean it in an ultrasonic cleaner I think) but even so, it's a great user experience. The contrast on this screen is just insanely good.

  2. #62
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    One of my sharpest lenses is on a Yashica 2.8 rangefinder that cost £3!
    I have a Yashica Minister with a very impressive lens. I feel ripped off now though as I paid £8 for mine!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #63

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    Regarding film latitude, you may also consider the new Kodak Portra 400 if you want to shoot color and have wide latitude.



    Link to larger version -> Kodak Portra 400

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Les Sarile View Post
    Regarding film latitude, you may also consider the new Kodak Portra 400 if you want to shoot color and have wide latitude.

    Link to larger version -> Kodak Portra 400
    Wow, that's impressive - looks like similar experiments I have seen with Ektar 100 before. I'll either never switch to colour 35mm, or only do so when I can get my hands on a truly kick-ass film scanner. And time is running our for people developing film around here... In 5 years, most of the places have disappeared. Getting the chemicals in South Africa is near-impossible.

  5. #65

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    Similar test conducted with Kodak BW400CN.



    Link to larger version -> Kodak BW400CN
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails standard.jpg  

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by philosomatographer View Post
    And very liberating. Of course, all my film bodies are the same in this regard (my OM-3Ti's batteries died some time last year, never replaced them). I guess I really like the F, because there is no dead meter bits in the viewfinder, just pure concentration on the image :-)

    I wrote couple of days ago on Thread: Your LATEST 35mm SLR camera purchase:

    Nikon F - I wanted fully mechanical body.
    It has meter-less prism: and it is nice for a change - when you look in finder there is nothing to distract you, not f stop, not shutter speed, nothing: just you and your frame to compose.

  7. #67

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    This thread has generated a lot of buzz. Most OM users tend to be quite attached to their systems and I'm no exception. When the system was first introduced I was ready, having owned (and loved) the Pen F cameras. In full frame however everything seemed too big and bulky. You have to remember that at that time, the early 70's, most Nikon F's were being sold with the big Photomic FTn meter heads, not exactly a svelte package. Before the OM-1 was introduced my full frame choice, driven as it was by compactness and weight, was the humble Fujica ST701. Other than the 55mm f1.8 I owned no other Fujinon lenses and rounded out my lens selection with Vivitar wide angle and tele lenses. Spotmatics were also compact but much more expensive and the ST701 viewfinder was a stop brighter than the Pentax. When the OM was introduced I knew I wanted it and it took a year to save up sufficient funds. In keeping with my weight and size preferences over the years I have selected the slower examples of Zuiko focal lengths in the 24, 35, 50, 135, and 200mm range. Of course my 85mm only came in f2 aperture. I have never been set up to enlarge bigger than 8 X 10 so there isn't much demand placed on my negs. Sometimes I print full frame, 6 X 9, only a 6X diameter enlargement. All that said the F, with a plain un-metered prism is a handsome camera with a very no nonsense, purposeful appearance. As my second childhood has unfolded I have again obtained a Pen F and 3 lenses and am now fairly obsessed with half frame. My poor OM kit has been sitting, lonely, on the shelf. This thread has reminded me why I need to dust it off and give it a little exercise. Thanks so much for your original post.

    And, I see you prefer the plain focusing screens. That's interesting as the first accessory I bought for my OM-1 was a 1-4 plain matte screen. Now I use the 1-10, matte with grid lines in all my OM's.
    Last edited by pen s; 12-07-2011 at 09:16 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by philosomatographer View Post
    Dear APUG'ers -

    ...the grand daddy of modern SLRs - the Nikon F - ....
    A side comment: If Nikon is the grand daddy, then Exakta must be the great grand daddy.

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by alanrockwood View Post
    A side comment: If Nikon is the grand daddy, then Exakta must be the great grand daddy.
    No, the Exakta is the great grandfather of 35mm SLRs, period. (Notice the missing "modern").

  10. #70

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    I scored a Rolleiflex TLR 3.5F Planar and a Nikkormat FTN with 50mm Nikkor-H F2 lens at an astronomy flea market for $150. While I was really after the Rollei, I found the Nikkormatt to be stunning with virtually any film I ran through it. I like the heft of the camera. The images are sharp and contrasty.

    While a wee bit off topic, the camera I almost always choose from my "collection" is a scale-focus Bessa-L with a 35mm F2.5 Voigtlander Color-Skopar. The metering is accurate and the lens is tack-sharp. With the bright accessory viewfinder and easy-to-discern LED metering, I find it to be a quick street camera. It looks similar to what HCB used in his early days.

    Life is good!
    Jerry
    Warrenton VA



 

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