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  1. #11
    mikewhi's Avatar
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    Another thought on the environment and equipment choices. There will be a fair amount of vibration. Airplane engines are basically non-muffled. They have mufflers, but I saw the insides of one once and it was basically hollow with a few baffles (and cost, like $500!!!). The level of vibration will be like driving down the road in a car with an unbalanced tire.

    So, fast lens, fast film and fast shutter speeds seem in order. I know the Leica R6.2 goes up to 1/2000th. The R6 tops out at 1/1000.

    Others can help more than I in this area. I shoot LF at small apertures and nice long exposures so I'm in a different world.

    Also, I'm wondering if 50mm is going to be enough. Depends on the altitude and how much he wants to take in. If he is photographing top-secret military installations or trying to catch Bush sunbathing on the roof of the White House, I would think he would need some long lenses, too which just makes the vibration issue worse. How about a glider? Zooms would be nice, but a fast one costs a mint.

    Can anyone suggest a long lens that is also fairly fast and not too much $$?

    -Mike

  2. #12
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhi
    So, fast lens, fast film and fast shutter speeds seem in order. I know the Leica R6.2 goes up to 1/2000th. The R6 tops out at 1/1000.
    -Mike
    The Contax Aria goes up to 1/4000. The AX (autofocus -- discontinued) does also.

    I just think the Contax SLR's didn't (past tense) receive the recognition they deserved. They're not making many nowadays and have gone heavy into digital.

    I guess I've gotten off topic, sorry.

  3. #13

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    Contax!

    The true WORKHORSE of photography (35 mm and Medium Format)

  4. #14

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    Camclicker:
    Since when has Zeiss made Leitz lenses? Just curiosity on my part.

  5. #15
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaggy
    Camclicker:
    Since when has Zeiss made Leitz lenses? Just curiosity on my part.
    I really don't the date. But my understanding is that it has been many years. I'm not suggesting Zeiss is sole manufacturer but "A" supplier.

  6. #16

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    I don't think so Bruce, I'm aware that with the exception of the 50mm f1 Noctilux, Leica doesn't make it's own glass, directly from sand. But except for a couple of weird exceptions such as the 24 f2.8 R and a mid range zoom, both made by Minolta, I do believe than Leica makes its own lenses. I think the latest incarnations of the Leica 50 f1.4 R and the Contax 50 f1.4 are different designs, with the Contax generally considered to be better.

  7. #17
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Really? My 50/1.4 Planar is stamped "made in japan" -- is this also true of the current Summilux? I do know that Kyocera makes some Leica lenses, to be sure -- the 180 for example.

    Half? No, a brand-new Planar 1.4 at B&H is $247, while the Summilux-R is $2295....

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  8. #18

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    Many thanks for the comments. I'll pass them along.

    David.

  9. #19
    skahde's Avatar
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    Leica used several sources as suppliers for speciality (shifts, superwides) as well as entry-point optics. Schneider-Kreuznach, Minolta and Sigma were or are among them. Currently the 4/80-200mm is manufatured by Kyocera who also manufacture most (but not all) lenses for the Contax-SLR. This lens was nevertheless developed by Leica and is not available from any other source. With respect to the different incarnations of the 50/1,4 I suggest you visit the forum at http://www.leica-camera.com/. But better wear your flamsuit before you suggest that it is or was made by Zeiss.

    Stefan
    Last edited by skahde; 11-02-2004 at 04:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
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    I've been a professional pilot for about a decade, now, and I seldom fly without my trusty Olympus OM-2n. It's been all over the world with me for more than 20 years. I also do nature photograhy, so between airplanes and 4WD's and backpacking into the most remote places, I can hardly complain about the camera's ruggedness and reliability. I primarily fly turbine and jet equipment now, so vibration isn't the problem it once was, but big and fast lenses are the order of the day. I seldom use a focal length shorter than 135mm for aerial work and f2.8 or bigger helps keep the shutter speed up. There are occasions for wider lenses, I just don't see them very often. On the ground, however, my 24mm is pretty much my favorite lens. Under the circumstances, depending on exactly what kind of aerial work your friend wants to do, he might be better served by going with the Nikon (or similar) and taking advantage of the cost savings by getting a bigger arsenal of lenses. As previously stated in tis thread - the operating environment of a piston aircraft is certainly no harsher than driving down a gravel road or hundreds or other situations that all kinds of cameras put up with every day. Tell your friend "good luck!" There's quite a learning curve involved with aerial photography; after all this time I think I'm still on the beginning part of it. :-)

    Bruce

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